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Radiation oncology areas of need: cancer incidence projections 2014-2024

Radiation oncology areas of need: cancer incidence projections 2014–2024 presents cancer incidence projections at the jurisdictional health planning region level for 2014 to 2024. These projections were developed specifically for Australian Government Department of Health planning purposes.

National Bowel Cancer Screening Program: monitoring report 2012-2013

This report presents statistics on the National Bowel Cancer Screening Program for Australians invited to take part from July 2012 to June 2013. Just over 320,000 of those invited chose to screen, with about 23,500 found to require further assessment.One out of every 17 assessments detected an advanced adenoma (precancerous lesion), and a bowel cancer was detected in 1 out of every 32 assessments.

Head and neck cancers in Australia

Head and neck cancers in Australia, presents the latest available information on incidence, mortality, survival and hospitalisations.Findings include: The total number of head and neck cancers diagnosed in 2009 was 3,896 accounting for 3.4% of all cancers diagnosed (114,137).The total number of deaths from head and neck cancers in 2011 was 944 accounting for 2.2% of all deaths from cancer (43,221).In 2006–2010, 5–year relative survival was 68.2% for all head and neck cancers combined. In 2011–12 there were 8,478 hospitalisations where head and neck cancer was the principal diagnosis.

Cervical screening in Australia 2011-2012

Cervical screening in Australia 2011-2012 presents the latest national statistics monitoring the National Cervical Screening Program, which aims to reduce incidence, morbidity and mortality from cervical cancer. Around 58% of women in the target age group of 20-69 took part in the program, with more than 3.7 million women screening in 2011 and 2012.Cervical cancer incidence for women of all ages remains at a historical low of 7 new cases per 100,000 women, and deaths are also low, historically and by international standards, at 2 deaths per 100,000 women.

Health system expenditure on cancer and other neoplasms in Australia 2008-09

Health system expenditure on cancer and other neoplasms in Australia, 2008-09 presents an overview of cancer expenditure focusing on the six cancers with the highest health system expenditure in each of four life stages 0-14, 15-24, 25-64 and 65 years and over. Findings include: Cancer and other neoplasms ranked sixth in terms of estimated health system expenditure on chronic diseases, accounting for 6.9% of total health system expenditure on all chronic diseases. Expenditure on national population screening programs totalled $332 million. From 2000-01 to 2008-09, total health system expenditure on cancer increased by 56% from $2,894 million to $4,526 million.

Report on monitoring activities of the National Cervical Screening Program Safety Monitoring Committee

This report looks at the evidence collected and assessed by the Safety Monitoring Committee established to assess whether there were adverse outcomes following the introduction of new NHMRC guidelines on how women with a low-grade Pap test result or a treated high-grade cervical biopsy result should be managed. Acknowledging that new evidence may come to light in future which could affect this picture, the overarching message from the evidence currently available and the methods used to assess this evidence is that the new guidelines have not led to an increase in cervical cancer in the seven years since they were introduced.

Prostate cancer in Australia

This is the first comprehensive national report on prostate cancer in Australia. It presents an overview of the condition and analysis of key summary measures including incidence, mortality and survival. Findings include:Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in Australia (excluding non-melanoma skin cancer), with 21,808 new diagnoses in 2009.Prostate cancer is the fourth leading cause of mortality among Australian males, with 3,294 deaths from prostate cancer in 2011.Around 9 in 10 (92%) males diagnosed with prostate cancer survive 5 years from diagnosis. This is higher than for all cancers (65%).

The inclusion of Indigenous status on pathology request forms

Under the National Indigenous Reform Agreement in 2008, the Council of Australian Government agreed to data quality improvements which are focussed on improving Indigenous identification in key data sets. This report outlines work towards the inclusion of Indigenous status on pathology request forms as a way to improve Indigenous identification in national cancer, communicable disease and cervical screening registries.

BreastScreen Australia monitoring report 2010-2011

BreastScreen Australia aims to reduce illness and death resulting from breast cancer through organised screening of women. This report is the latest in an annual series that presents national statistics monitoring the program against performance indicators.More than 1.3 million women in the target age group of 50-69 were screened in 2010-2011, a participation rate of 55%. Breast cancer mortality is at a historic low, at 43 deaths per 100,000 women.

Cancer in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples of Australia: an overview

Brings together the most up-to-date data available from a wide range of sources to describe the status of cancer in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Australia. Information on difference across age, sex and remoteness areas are presented and key issues are highlighted. The report provides a comprehensive picture of cancer in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Australia that should be useful to health professionals, policy makers and others with an interest in the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders.

National Bowel Cancer Screening Program: July 2011 - June 2012 monitoring report

This report presents statistics on the National Bowel Cancer Screening Program for Australians invited to take part between July 2011 and June 2012. Just over 320,000 people were screened in that time, with about 22,500 found to require further assessment. One out of every 15 assessments recorded detected an advanced adenoma (pre-cancerous lesion), and a bowel cancer was detected in 1 out of every 32 assessments.

Cervical screening in Australia 2010-2011

Cervical screening in Australia 2010-2011 presents the latest national statistics monitoring the National Cervical Screening Program, which aims to reduce incidence, morbidity and mortality from cervical cancer. Around 57% of women in the target age group of 20-69 took part in the program, with more than 3.6 million women screened in 2010 and 2011. Cervical cancer incidence in this age group remains at a historical low of 9 new cases per 100,000 women, and deaths are also low, historically and by international standards, at 2 deaths per 100,000 women.

Cancer in Australia: in brief 2012

Cancer in Australia: in brief 2012 presents key points and trends from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare's latest biennial report about cancer in Australia, Cancer in Australia: an overview, 2012.

Cancer in Australia: an overview 2012

Cancer in Australia: an overview, 2012 presents the latest available information on incidence, mortality, survival, prevalence, burden of cancer, hospitalisations and national cancer screening programs. It is estimated that the most commonly diagnosed cancers in 2012 will be prostate cancer, bowel cancer and breast cancer. For all cancers combined, the incidence rate increased by 12% from 1991 to 2009, but the mortality rate decreased and survival improved over time. Cancer outcomes differ by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander status, remoteness area and socioeconomic status.

BreastScreen Australia monitoring report 2009-2010

BreastScreen Australia aims to reduce illness and death resulting from breast cancer through organised screening of women. This report is the latest in an annual series that presents national statistics monitoring the program against performance indicators.More than 1.3 million women in the target age group of 50-69 were screened in 2009-2010, a participation rate of 55%. Breast cancer mortality is at a historic low, at 43 deaths per 100,000 women.

Breast cancer in Australia: an overview

Data in this report provide a comprehensive picture of breast cancer in Australia including how breast cancer rates differ by geographical area, socioeconomic status, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander status and country of birth.

Gynaecological cancers in Australia: an overview

Data in this report provide a comprehensive picture of gynaecological cancer in Australia including how gynaecological cancer rates differ by geographical area, socioeconomic status, Indigenous status and country of birth.

Cancer survival and prevalence in Australia: period estimates from 1982 to 2010

This report presents the latest national survival and prevalence statistics for cancers in Australia from 1982 to 2010. Five-year survival for all cancers combined increased from 47% in 1982-1987 to 66% in 2006-2010. The largest survival gains over this time were for prostate cancer, kidney cancer and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. In 2006-2010, cancers with the highest survival were those of the testis, lip, prostate and thyroid, and melanoma of the skin. In comparison, pancreatic cancer and mesothelioma had the lowest survival.

National Centre for Monitoring Cancer Framework: 2012

The National Centre for Monitoring Cancer (NCMC) was established by the Australian Government in 2009 to monitor cancer rates, impacts and outcomes in Australia. The centre is located and managed within the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare. The NCMC Framework guides and organises the systematic planning, implementation and evaluation of NCMC activities.

Cancer in Australia 2012: in brief

Online version of Cancer in Australia 2012: in brief. This report provides highlights from the full report Cancer in Australia: an overview 2012.

Cervical screening in Australia 2009-2010

 Cervical screening in Australia 2009-2010 presents the latest national statistics monitoring the National Cervical Screening Program, which aims to reduce incidence, morbidity and mortality from cervical cancer.About 57% of women in the target age group of 20-69 took part in the program, with more than 3.6 million women screened in 2009 and 2010. Cervical cancer incidence in this age group remains at a historical low of 9 new cases per 100,000 women, and deaths are also low, historically and by international standards, at 2 deaths per 100,000 women.

Cancer incidence projections, Australia 2011 to 2020

This report presents detailed projections of cancer incidence in Australia for 2011 to 2020. These projections are  based on trends in national cancer incidence data from 1982 to 2007. It shows the number of cases of cancer diagnosed in Australia each year is projected to rise over the next decade for both males and females, and is expected to reach about 150,000 in 2020, with prostate and breast cancer continuing to be the most common cancers diagnosed in men and women respectively.

National Bowel Cancer Screening Program monitoring report: phase 2, July 2008- June 2011

This report presents statistics on the National Bowel Cancer Screening Program for Australians invited to take part between July 2008 and June 2011. Just over 800,000 people were screened in that time, with about 60,000 found to require further assessment. One out of every 11 colonoscopies performed for further assessment detected and removed an advanced adenoma (pre-cancerous lesion), and a cancer was detected in 1 out of every 33 colonoscopies. However, this represents only a partial picture of outcomes due to incomplete reporting.

BreastScreen Australia monitoring report 2008-2009

BreastScreen Australia aims to reduce morbidity and mortality from breast cancer through organised breast cancer screening. This report presents national statistics for the program. More than 1.3 million women aged 50-69 participated in BreastScreen Australia in 2008-2009, equivalent to around 55% of the target age group. Deaths from breast cancer are at an historic low at 47 deaths per 100,000 women aged 50-69 in 2007.

Cancer in adolescents and young adults in Australia

'Cancer in adolescents and young adults in Australia' presents the latest available incidence, survival and mortality statistics on cancer in young Australians aged 15 to 29. The incidence of cancer in this age group has become steady since the mid-1990s while cancer mortality has fallen between 1983 and 2007. Survival from cancer in adolescents and young adults has been relatively high and has improved with time, although cancer outcomes vary across population groups.

Lung cancer in Australia: an overview

Data in this report provide a comprehensive picture of lung cancer in Australia including how lung cancer rates differ by geographical area, socioeconomic status, Indigenous status and country of birth.

Cervical screening in Australia 2008-2009

The National Cervical Screening Program aims to reduce incidence, morbidity and mortality from cervical cancer. Cervical screening in Australia 2008-2009 presents national statistics monitoring the NCSP using new performance indicators.  For women in the target age group, 20-69 years, participation in the program was around 59%, with more than 3.6 million women screened over the 2 years 2008-2009. Cervical cancer incidence remains at an historical low of 9 new cases per 100,000 women, and deaths are also low, historically and by international standards, at 2 deaths per 100,000 women.

Identifying palliative care separations in admitted patient data: technical paper

This technical paper explores the most appropriate method of identifying those separations that occurred in Australian hospitals for which palliative care was a substantial component of the care provided. Coding and collection rules are considered, as well as national admitted patient data for 1999-00 to 2008-09.

Contribution of chronic disease to the gap in mortality between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and other Australians

Chronic diseases are major contributors to the mortality gap between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and other Australians.  About 80% of the mortality gap for people aged 35 to 74 years is due to chronic diseases, measured in terms of potential years of life lost. The major contributors are heart diseases, diabetes, liver diseases, chronic lower respiratory disease, cerebrovascular diseases and cancer.

Calculating screening rates for bowel cancer: Methodologies for the National Bowel Cancer Screening Program and the National healthcare Agreement performance indicators explained

Although similar concepts, the National Bowel Cancer Screening Program participation monitoring indicator and the National Healthcare Agreement key performance indicator for bowel cancer screening (PI-12) are different measures. Consequently, they produce different results. This paper describes and explains the differences between the two indicators.

Premature mortality from chronic disease

This bulletin uses potential years of life lost to describe mortality patterns for deaths due to chronic disease. It shows that most premature deaths were due to chronic disease. The leading cause of premature mortality among females was breast cancer and among males it was coronary heart disease. Further, the bulletin highlights that a large proportion of premature chronic disease deaths were also potentially avoidable.

Cancer in Australia 2010: in brief

Cancer has a greater overall impact on the health of Australians than any other disease group. On average, 1 in 2 Australians will develop cancer and 1 in 5 will die from it before the age of 85 years.

Cancer in Australia 2010: an overview

Cancer in Australia: an overview, 2010 provides a comprehensive overview of national statistics on cancer in Australia. The report presents the latest available statistics on cancer overall, as well as on many individual types of cancers, and it includes information on incidence, mortality, survival, prevalence, burden of cancer, hospitalisations, and national cancer screening programs.

National Bowel Cancer Screening Program: annual monitoring report 2009 data supplement 2010

The National Bowel Cancer Screening Program annual monitoring report 2009 presented estimated national statistics on key program activity, performance and outcome indicators for people invited to screen in 2008.Using the latest program data to January 2010, this data supplement provides final statistics on participation, documented follow-up procedures, and cancer and bowel abnormality detection outcomes for these people.While this data update provides a larger amount of outcome data, incomplete reporting, particularly histopathology confirmations, still hinders a complete picture of participant outcomes.

BreastScreen Australia monitoring report 2006-2007 and 2007-2008

Breast cancer is the second most common cause of death from cancer in Australian women. BreastScreen Australia monitoring report 2006-2007 and 2007-2008 is the tenth report presenting national statistics (combining data from the 2006-2007 and 2007-2008 reporting periods) on key program activity, performance and outcome indicators for BreastScreen Australia, which aims to reduce mortality and morbidity from breast cancer through detecting cancers early. Since BreastScreen Australia commenced in 1991, mortality from breast cancer has decreased steadily. Further, more than half of all invasive breast cancers detected by BreastScreen Australia are small, with small breast cancers associated with increased treatment options and improved survival.

BreastScreen Australia monitoring report 2006-2007 and 2007-2008: supplementary data tables

This publication provides supplementary data tables to the BreastScreen Australia monitoring report 2006-2007 and 2007-2008 report.

Cervical screening in Australia 2007-2008

This data report uses the previous definition of performance indicators, and supplies up-to-date data, but with no commentary. A full report using the new definitions of the performance indicators (for 2008-2009) will follow.

Gynaecological cancer projections 2010-2015

This document provides information on the projected incidence of gynaecological cancers for the calendar years 2010 to 2015, by state and territory and at the national level.

Health system expenditure on disease and injury in Australia, 2004-05

Health system expenditure on disease and injury in Australia, 2004-05 provides a systematic analysis of health system expenditures associated with specific disease and injury groups in Australia in 2004-05. Expenditure on cardiovascular disease is compared with expenditure on cancer, injuries, nervous system disorders and other diseases. Health expenditure for each age group ranges from $2,223 per year for girls/boys aged 5 to 14 years to $8,030 per year for women/men aged 75 to 84 years. This report also discusses the changes in expenditure by disease between 2000-01 and 2004-05.

Risk of invasive breast cancer in women diagnosed with ductal carcinoma in situ in Australia between 1995 and 2005

This report presents data that show that women who are diagnosed with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) are at significantly increased risk of being diagnosed with invasive breast cancer later on in their lives, even though the DCIS would have been treated appropriately at the time. Thus these women warrant close medical surveillance in order to detect and treat any invasive breast cancers that may arise.

Ovarian cancer in Australia: an overview, 2010

Ovarian cancer was the most common cause of gynaecological cancer death and the sixth most common cause of cancer-related death among women in 2006. Although the prognosis for women diagnosed with ovarian cancer was relatively poor compared with a number of other cancers, the prognosis has improved over time. These and other data in this report provide a comprehensive picture of ovarian cancer in Australia including how ovarian cancer rates differ by age, Indigenous status, country of birth, socioeconomic status and geographical area.

National Bowel Cancer Screening Program: annual monitoring report 2009

The National Bowel Cancer Screening Program annual monitoring report 2009 presents national statistics on key program activity, performance and outcome indicators for people invited to screen in 2008. Trend and national bowel cancer incidence and mortality data are also included to provide context. In 2008, participation in the program was around 39% and documented follow-up procedures detected 302 people having cancer; however, this represents only a partial picture of outcomes due to time lags and incomplete reporting.

Breast cancer in Australia: an overview, 2009

Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers in Australian women with over 12,000 new cases diagnosed in 2006, and projections suggest that the number of new cases will continue to grow. A total of 2,618 women died from breast cancer in 2006, making it the second most common cause of cancer-related deaths for women. Trend data indicate that breast cancer mortality rates for females have been declining since the mid 1990s and that outcomes for women diagnosed with breast cancer have improved over recent decades. These and other data in this report provide a comprehensive picture of breast cancer in Australia including how breast cancer rates differ by Indigenous status, country of birth and geographic area.

BreastScreen Australia monitoring report 2005-2006

Breast cancer is the second most common cause of death from cancer in Australian women. The BreastScreen Australia Program aims to reduce mortality and morbidity from breast cancer through detecting cancers early, with over 1.5 million women (56.9%) aged 50-69 years participating in the Program in 2005-2006. Mortality from breast cancer has decreased steadily since the Program commenced in 1991, from 66 to 47 deaths per 100,000 women.

Cervical screening in Australia 2006-2007

The major objective of the National Cervical Screening Program is to reduce incidence and mortality from cervical cancer. Over 3.5 million women (61.5%) aged 20-69 years participated in the Program in 2006-2007, up from the last report. Incidence and mortality remain low at 9 new cases in 2005 and 2 deaths in 2006 per 100,000 women aged 20-69 years.

Third study of mortality and cancer incidence in aircraft maintenance personnel: a continuing study of F-111 Deseal/Reseal personnel 2009

In 1977, the Royal Australian Air Force commenced a series of Deseal / Reseal (DSRS) programs on the fuel tanks of F-111 aircraft. These programs were implemented to correct fuel leaks inside the F-111 fuel tanks. A number of concerns were raised about health outcomes in personnel who worked on these programs.This report builds on previous findings from studies on mortality and cancer incidence of personnel who worked on the DSRS programs. The report will be a valuable resource for policy makers, program managers and health professionals interested in health outcomes of military personnel.

Cancer in Australia: an overview, 2008

Cancer in Australia: an overview, 2008 presents comprehensive national data on cancer incidence and mortality in 2005 and projections for 2006 to 2010. Other topics covered include incidence of lymphohaematopoietic cancers using a WHO-based classification scheme, cancers attributed to smoking and excessive alcohol consumption, incidence in the states and territories, incidence rates and most common cancers over the life span and cancer-related hospitalisations. Summaries are provided for cancer survival, cancer prevalence, the cancer screening programs and the burden of cancer. The report is complemented by substantial online cancer data on the AIHW website.

National Bowel Cancer Screening Program monitoring report 2008

The National Bowel Cancer Screening Program aims to reduce mortality and morbidity from bowel cancer by maximising early detection. Bowel cancer is the second most common cause of death from cancer in Australia.National Bowel Cancer Screening Program monitoring report 2008 is the second annual report based on key program activity, performance and outcome indicators to monitor the achievements of the National Bowel Cancer Screening Program. The report presents the most recent information on participation in bowel screening, cancer detection, program sensitivity and rescreening rates. In addition, the report presents national bowel cancer incidence and mortality data to provide a context for these indicators of screening activity. Where possible, the data are presented by state and territory, as well as nationally.This report will be relevant to anyone with an interest in population health or bowel screening, including health planners and administrators, various health practitioners, academic researchers and the general public.

Eye health among Australian children

Reducing preventable vision loss has recently been identified as a priority by both Australian governments and non-government organisations. 'Eye health among Australian children' is the second in a series of national reports providing an overview of eye health in Australia. The report looks at the prevalence of eye problems among children, including vision disability, congenital anomalies and cancer. Statistics for children treated within the primary care sector, as well as in hospitals, are also presented. The report is an invaluable resource for policy-makers, health professionals, advocacy groups and others interested in knowing more about children's eye health.

Non-melanoma skin cancer: general practice consultations, hospitalisation and mortality

Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is the most common cancer diagnosed in Australia, with around 400,000 new cases per year. However, data on incidence and prevalence are not routinely collected. This report analyses data on NMSC available from the national general practice, hospitalisation and mortality collections to illustrate the burden of NMSC in Australia. Differentials by population subgroup (geographic region, socioeconomic status and country of birth) are provided where possible.

Cancer survival and prevalence in Australia: cancers diagnosed from 1982 to 2004

'Cancer survival and prevalence in Australia' presents national cancer data on relative survival and prevalence in Australia for invasive cancers other than non-melanoma skin cancer. It provides trend statistics on the survival of persons diagnosed with invasive cancer from 1982-1986 to 1998-2004, and analyses survival outcomes by age, sex, geographic region and socioeconomic status quintile. The report includes data on prevalence by cancer site, age, sex, geographic region and socioeconomic status quintile. To aid in interpretation, the appendices include incidence numbers and rates by geographic region and socioeconomic status quintile.'Cancer survival and prevalence in Australia' is an important reference for anyone interested in cancer outcomes and cancer control planning in Australia.

BreastScreen Australia monitoring report 2004-2005

Breast cancer is the most common cause of death from cancer in Australian women. The BreastScreen Australia Program aims to reduce mortality and morbidity from breast cancer by maximising early detection and reports key program activity, performance and outcome indicators to monitor the achievements of the BreastScreen Australia Program. The report combines data from state and territory BreastScreen programs, cancer registries and the AIHW mortality database. The audience includes anyone with an interest in breast cancer screening.BreastScreen Australia monitoring report 2004-2005 is the eighth annual report based on key program activity. The report presents the most recent information at the national level on participation in breast screening, cancer detection, program sensitivity and recall to assessment and rescreening rates. In addition, the report presents national breast cancer incidence and mortality data to provide a context for these indicators of screening activity. Where possible, the data are presented by state and territory as well as nationally.The report will be relevant to anyone with an interest in women's health or breast screening, including health planners and administrators, various health practitioners, academic researchers and the general public.

Cervical screening in Australia 2005-2006

The major objective of the National Cervical Screening Program is to reduce morbidity and mortality from cervical cancer by maximising early detection.Cervical screening in Australia 2005-2006 is the tenth annual report on key program activity, performance and outcome indicators to monitor the achievements of the National Cervical Screening Program. The report provides a comprehensive national picture of cervical screening in Australia for 2005-2006. The report presents the most recent information on participation in cervical screening, rate of early re-screening, low- and high-grade abnormalities detected, and incidence and mortality of cervical cancer. Where possible, data are presented by state and territory stratification as well as nationally.This report will be relevant to anyone with an interest in women's health or cervical screening, including health planners and administrators, various health practitioners, academic researchers and the general public.

National Bowel Cancer Screening Program monitoring report 2007

The National Bowel Cancer Screening Program aims to reduce mortality and morbidity from bowel cancer by maximising early detection. Bowel cancer is the second most common cause of death from cancer in Australia.'National Bowel Cancer Screening Program monitoring report 2007' is the first annual report based on key program activity, performance and outcome indicators to monitor the achievements of the National Bowel Cancer Screening Program. The report presents the most recent information on participation in bowel screening, cancer detection, program sensitivity and rescreening rates. In addition, the report presents national bowel cancer incidence and mortality data to provide a context for these indicators of screening activity. Where possible, the data presented by state and territory as well as nationally.This report will be relevant to anyone with an interest in population health or bowel screening, including health planners and administrators, various health practitioners, academic researchers and the general public.

Breast cancer survival by size and nodal status in Australia

Breast cancer survival by size and nodal status provides relative survival data up to nine years after diagnosis for women diagnosed in Australia with breast cancer in 1997. There are breakdowns of survival proportions by size of cancer, nodal status, geographic region and socioeconomic status.

Cancer in Australia: an overview, 2006

Cancer in Australia: an overview, 2006 presents comprehensive national data on cancer incidence and mortality in Australia, and hospitalisation trend data from 2000-01 to 2004-05. The report provides 2006 projections on incidence and 2003 data for cancers by site, age and sex, with summary data for each state and territory. Prostate cancer and cancer differentials for rural areas analysed. The information in this report is supported by more detailed information in cancer incidence and mortality data cubes and workbooks on the AIHW's website www.aihw.gov.au. Cancer in Australia: an overview, 2006 is an important reference from the Cancer series for all those interested in the health of Australians.

Cervical screening in Australia 2004-2005

Cervical screening in Australia 2004-2005 is the ninth annual report on key program activity, performance and outcome indicators to monitor the achievements of the National Cervical Screening Program. The report provides a comprehensive national picture of cervical screening in Australia for 2004-2005. The report presents most recent information on participation in cervical screening, rate of early re-screening, low-grade and high-grade abnormalities detected, incidence of cervical cancer and morality. Analyses of incidence and mortality data by location (major cities, regional and remote) as well as mortality by Indigenous status are also presented. Where possible, data are presented by state and territory stratification. The report will be relevant to anyone with an interest in women's health or cervical screening, including health planners and administrators, various health practitioners, academic researchers and the general public.

BreastScreen Australia monitoring report 2003-2004

Breast cancer is the most common cause of death from cancer in Australian women. The BreastScreen Australia program aims to reduce mortality and morbidity from breast cancer by maximising early detection. BreastScreen Australia monitoring report 2003-2004 is the eighth annual report based on key program activity, performance and outcome indicators to monitor the achievements of the BreastScreen Australia program. It presents the most recent information on participation in breast screening, cancer detection, program sensitivity and recall to assessment and rescreening rates. In addition, the report presents national breast cancer incidence and mortality data to provide a context for these indicators of ssreening activity. Where possible, the data are presented by state and territory as well as nationally. This report will be relevant to anyone with an interest in women's health or breast screening, including health planners and administrators, various health practitioners, academic researchers and the general public.

Ovarian cancer in Australia: an overview, 2006

This report provides a compendium of the latest statistics on ovarian cancer available from a range of data sources.

Breast cancer in Australia: an overview, 2006

Breast cancer in Australia: an overview, 2006 provides a comprehensive statistical overview of breast cancer in females and males. The report provides data for include breast cancer incidence to 2002 with projections to 2011, prevalence to 2002, mortality to 2004, survival to 2002, screening to 2002-2003, hospital admissions to 2003-04, Medical Benefits Schedule and Pharmaceutical Benefits Schedule services to 2004-05 and expenditure in 2000-01. The report, commissioned by the National Breast Cancer Centre, will be an important reference for anyone interested in breast cancer and women's health.

Cervical screening in Australia 2003-2004

This is the eighth national report monitoring the performance of the National Cervical Screening Program using ten indicators which measure program activity, performance and outcome. These indicators help measure changes in disease patterns and examine the contribution of cervical screening to preventing or reducing deaths from cancer of the cervix. It differs from previous reports that were exclusively published on the internet in that it is limited to presenting data from the Programs in table format and does not include the usual descriptive text and graphs.

Hospitalised basketball and netball injuries

Exercise is important for minimising risk of conditions including cardiovascular disease, stroke, diabetes, cancer, hypertension, mental health disorders and premature death. It is not uncommon for participants to be injured but most injuries are not severe. A study of sport- and exercise-related injury in the Latrobe Valley found one hospital admission for every 10 emergency admissions and 12 general practiceconsultations. Hospitalised injuries tend to be more severe and costly than other injuries. Hence, while hospitalised sports injuries are small as a proportion of all sport injuries, they warrant attention.

BreastScreen Australia monitoring report 2002-2003

Breast cancer is the most common cause of death from cancer in Australian women. The BreastScreen Australia Program aims to reduce mortality and morbidity from breast cancer by maximising early detection.BreastScreen Australia monitoring report 2002-2003 is the seventh annual report based on key program activity, performance and outcome indicators to monitor the achievements of the BreastScreen Australia Program. The report presents the most recent information on participation in breast screening, cancer detection, program sensitivity and recall to assessment and rescreening rates. In addition, the report presents national breast cancer incidence and mortality data to provide a context for these indicators of screening activity. Where possible, the data are presented by state and territory as well as nationally.This report will be relevant to anyone with an interest in women's health or breast screening, including health planners and administrators, various health practitioners, academic researchers and the general public.

Rural, regional and remote health: mortality trends 1992-2003

This report compares changes in mortality in Australia's major cities, regional and remote areas in the period 1992-2003. Trends for Australia's broad geographic regions are compared for a range of specific causes of death including coronary heart disease, lung cancer, cervical cancer, asthma, suicide, motor vehicle traffic accidents, diabetes and many others.

Cervical screening in Australia 2002-2003

The report presents most recent information on participation in cervical screening, rate of early re-screening, low-grade and high-grade abnormalities detected, incidence of cervical cancer and mortality. Analyses of incidence and mortality data by location (major cities, regional and remote) as well as mortality by Indigenous status are also presented. Where possible, data are presented by state and territory stratification.

Selected chronic diseases among Australia's children

This bulletin presents information on the incidence, prevalence and trends for three of the major chronic diseases among children-asthma, diabetes and cancer. In addition, information about problems managed by general practitioners is presented, as well as a summary of hospitalisations and deaths for a wider range of childhood chronic diseases including cerebral palsy, epilepsy and cystic fibrosis.

Cancer incidence projections Australia 2002 to 2011

This report presents detailed projections of cancer incidence for major cancers.The report provides projections of both incidence rates and expected numbers of new cases by age and sex for 60 cancers and groups of cancers. The projections in this report are based on trends in national cancer incidence data from 1982 to 2001 held by the AIHW in the National Cancer Statistics Clearing House. The projections in this report were commissioned by the National Cancer Strategies Group to support planning of cancer services and this report is an important reference for all those interested in the prevention, detection, treatment and management of cancer in Australia.

Health system expenditures on cancer and other neoplasms in Australia 2000-01

The first comprehensive study of cancer health system expenditures in Australia covered the year 1993-94 and was released in 1998. This report updates the expenditure estimates to 2000-01 and includes 'other neoplasms' as well as cancers. The methodology has been revised in some areas and the analysis applied across the cancer site groups used in the first Australian Burden of Disease Study.

BreastScreen Australia monitoring report 2001-02

This is the sixth national monitoring report for the BreastScreen Australia Program. The report presents statistics on BreastScreen Australia screening activity and outcomes for 2001-02. A reporting interval of two years is used because it corresponds with the recommended interval between screens for asymptomatic women in the target age group of 50-69 years.

Cancer in Australia 2001

Cancer in Australia 2001 present comprehensive national data on cancer incidence and mortality and summary data on cancer screening, the cancer workforce and cancer expenditure in Australia. The report provides 2001 data for cancers by site, age and sex, and summary data for each State and Territory. Incidence and mortality trends since the early 1980s and age patterns for selected cancers are features of this report. Cancer in Australia 2001 is an important reference from the Cancer Series for all those interested in the health of Australians.

Cervical screening in Australia 2001-02

This report is the sixth national report on the performance of the National Cervical Screening Program in Australia. Cervical screening services are provided as part of mainstream health services with general practitioners performing approximately 80% of Pap smears. The program is funded by the Australian Government, and the state and territory governments.This report presents statistics on the performance monitoring indicators agreed to by the National Advisory Committee to the program.

Data set specification, cancer (clinical): National Health Data Dictionary version 12 supplement

Data Set Specifications (DSS) are metadata sets that are not mandated for collection but are recommended as best practice. This metadata set is primarily concerned with the clinical use of cancer data. While the use of this standard is voluntary, it should be used by health and health-related establishments that create, use or maintain, records on health care clients. The Cancer (clinical) DSS aims to ensure national consistency in relation to defining, monitoring and recording information on patients diagnosed with cancer.

BreastScreen Australia monitoring report 1998-1999 and 1999-2000

This report is the fourth annual report based on key program activity, performance and outcome indicators to monitor the achievements of the BreastScreen Australia Program. The report presents the most recent information on participation in breast screening, cancer detection, program sensitivity and recall to assessment and rescreening rates.

Cervical screening in Australia 2000-2001 and 1999-2000

This is the third annual report based on key program activity, performance and outcome indicators to monitor the achievements of the National Cervical Screening Program. The report provides a comprehensive national picture of cervical screening in Australia for 2000-2001 and 1999-2000. The report presents most recent information on participation in cervical screening, rate of early rescreening, low-grade and high-grade abnormalities detected, incidence of cervical cancer and mortality. Analysis of incidence and mortality data by location (rural, remote and metropolitan) as well as mortality by Indigenous status are also presented. Where possible, data are presented by state and territory stratification.

BreastScreen Australia monitoring report 2000-2001

This report is the fifth annual report based on key program activity, performance and outcome indicators to monitor the achievements of the BreastScreen Australia Program. The report presents the most recent information on participation in breast screening, cancer detection, program sensitivity and recall to assessment and rescreening rates. In addition, the report presents national breast cancer incidence and mortality data to provide a context for these indicators of screening activity. Where possible, the data are presented by state and territory as well as nationally.

Cancer incidence study 2003: Australian veterans of the Korean War

This study was commissioned by the Department of Veterans' Affairs and has investigated the incidence rates of cancer among Australian male veterans of the Korean War between 1982 and 1999 and compared these with the incidence rates over the same period for male members of the general Australian population of the same age.

Cancer in Australia 2000

Cancer in Australia 2000 presents comprehensive national data on cancer incidence and mortality and summary data on cancer screening and admitted hospital patients. The report provides 2000 data for cancers by site, age and sex, and summary data for each state and territory. Incidence and mortality trends since the early 1980s and age patterns for selected cancers are features of this report. The information in this report is supported by more detailed information for all cancer sites on the AIHW's web site wwww.aihw.gov.au.Cancer in Australia 2000 is an important reference from the Cancer Series for all those interested in the health of Australians.

Cancer survival in Australia 1992-1997: geographic categories and socioeconomic status

Cancer Survival in Australia 1992-1997 is the first national analysis of how cancer survival varies by socioeconomic status and geographic region. It presents an analysis of five-year relative survival proportions by geographic category and socioeconomic status for persons diagnosed with cancer during the years 1992-1997.This analysis is presented by age and sex for all cancers (Excluding non-melanocytic skin cancers) combined and for the following National Health Priority Area cancers - colorectal cancer, cancer of the lung, melanoma, cancer of the breast (females only), cancer of the cervix, cancer of the prostate, and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.This report is the third in a series of three reports on relative survival after being diagnosed with cancer. It is an important reference for all those interested in the health of Australians.

Cervical screening in Australia 1999-2000

Cervical Screening in Australia 1999-2000 provides a comprehensive national picture of cervical screening in Australia for the two-year period 1999-2000, based on key program activity, performance and outcome indicators.The report presents the most recent information on participation in cervical screening, the rates of early re-screening, detection of low-grade and high-grade abnormalities, and cervical cancer incidence and mortality. It includes analyses of incidence and mortality by location (rural, remote and metropolitan) as well as mortality by Indigenous status. Where possible, data are presented by State and Territory as well as for Australia as a whole.Cervical Screening in Australia 1999-2000 is the fourth annual report of the National Cervical Screening Program.

Reproductive health indicators Australia 2002

This is the first national report on the reproductive health of men and women in Australia. It provides comprehensive information on 44 indicators covering fertility, subfertility, family planning, pregnancy, childbirth, sexually transmissible infections and cancers of the reproductive tract. This report is an important reference and information source for all Australians with an interest in reproductive health.

Cervical screening in Australia 1998-1999

This report provides a comprehensive national picture of cervical screening in Australia for 1998-1999. It presents most recent information on participation in cervical screening, rate of early re-screening, low-grade and high-grade abnormalities detected, incidence of cervical cancer and mortality. Analysis of incidence and mortality data by location (rural, remote and metropolitan) as well as mortality by Indigenous status are also presented.

Cancer in Australia 1999

Cancer in Australia 1999 presents comprehensive national data on cancer incidence and mortality and summary data on screening, survival, inpatient hospital and general practice episodes, risk factors, and the cancer workforce. The report provides 1999 data for cancer by site, age and sex, and summary data for each State and Territory. Incidence and mortality trends since the early 1980s and age patterns for selected cancers are features of this report.Cancer in Australia 1999 is an important reference from the Cancer Series for all those interested in the health of Australians.

Seasonality of death

Deaths are predictable to some extent, in that they occur more often for particular causes such as cardiovascular disease or cancers, or at older ages, or within vulnerable population groups. Deaths also tend to occur more often at certain times of the year. In Australia, as in other developed countries, most deaths occur in colder months. Deaths attributable to a number of specific causes follow a yearly cycle, peaking in winter and occurring less frequently in summer. Deaths for some causes are also more frequent on certain days of the week, or even at certain times of the day.This bulletin will examine these patterns of death to see how deaths vary by day, by month and by season, and whether these patterns have changed over time.

Chronic diseases and associated risk factors in Australia, 2001

Chronic diseases and associated risk factors in Australia, 2001 provides statistical overviews of a number of long-lasting conditions, disorders and illnesses that comprise the quality of life of a large number of Australians. In particular, the report examines the burden of disease associated with a set of chronic diseases in the context of their long course through life, persistent effects and associated disability. Heart problems, a variety of cancers, several lung diseases, diabetes, arthritis, depression and dental caries are some of the chronic disease and conditions covered. Risk factors leading to or contributing to these factors such as high blood pressure, high blood cholesterol and excess weight are also examined.

Breast cancer size and nodal status

The aim of the BreastScreen Australia Program is to detect invasive breast cancers in women early while they are small and before they have spread beyond the breast; this gives the best chance of effective treatment.This report presents information on breast cancer size and nodal status supplied by BreastScreen Australia and State and Territory cancer registries. It is based on all invasive breast cancers diagnosed in Australia in 1997, and includes tumours diagnosed in women known to have had breast cancer previously.

Cancer survival in Australia, 2001: Part 1: national summary statistics

Cancer Survival in Australia 2001 is a series of three reports on relative survival after being diagnosed with cancer during the period 1982-1997.Part 1: National Summary Statistics of cancer survival in Australia, 2001 presents national level data. The report covers the period 1982-1997, and provides an analysis of one-, five- and ten- year relative survival proportions (along with numbers of new cases and deaths) by age and sex, for all cancers and the 20 main cancers. The report includes comparisons with a number of other Western countries.Cancer Survival in Australia 2001 is an important reference for those interested in the health of Australians.

Cancer survival in Australia, 2001: Part 2: statistical tables

This volume (Part 2) of the Cancer Survival in Australia 2001 report supports the findings in Part 1, presenting detailed tables for each cancer site.

Cancer in Australia 1998: incidence and mortality data for 1998

Cancer in Australia 1998 presents comprehensive national data on cancer incidence and mortality. The report provides 1998 data for cancers by site, age and sex, and summary data for each State and Territory. Incidence and mortality trends since the early 1980s, age patterns for selected cancers, comparisons with New Zealand cancer data and an analysis of cancers of unknown primary site are features of this report. The information in this report is supported by more detailed information for all cancer sites on the AIHW's web site www.aihw.gov.au. Cancer in Australia 1998 is an important reference from the Cancer Series for all those interested in the health of Australians.

Morbidity of Vietnam veterans: adrenal gland cancer, leukaemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, supplementary report 2

This report provides medical validations for three conditions of concern regarding the health of Vietnam veterans and their children - adrenal gland cancer in veterans' children, the four main types of leukaemia in veterans and their children, and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in veterans.It is the second supplementary report to Morbidity of Vietnam Veterans: Volume 3 Validation Study and responds to a recommendation of that study that 'cancer of the adrenal gland in veterans' children be further investigated and compared to a derived community standard'. Comparisons have also been made for the four leukaemia types to expand on the total leukaemia comparisons from the study, while the non-Hodgkin's lymphoma comparisons are revisions to those included in the validation report.This report further extends the knowledge about the health of Vietnam veterans and their families.

National public health expenditure report 1998-99

This report is the first of its type in Australia. It provides public health expenditure information from each of the State, Territory and Commonwealth health departments, based on eight distinct public health expenditure categories: communicable disease control; selected health promotion activities; immunisation; environmental health; food standards and hygiene; breast cancer screening; cervical screening; all other core public health. This report is part of the National Public Health Expenditure Project (NPHEP).

Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS)

Provides a summary on Ductal Carcinoma In Situ (DCIS) derived from the State and Territory cancer registries and the BreastScreen Australia Program. The data highlight the changing DCIS patterns with the introduction of mammography in Australia. This information is useful to health professionals, women with DCIS, policy makers and planners.

Cancer in Australia 1997: incidence and mortality data for 1997 and selected data for 1998 and 1999

Presents comprehensive national data on cancer incidence and mortality. The report provides 1997 data for cancers by site, age and sex, and summary data for each State and Territory. Incidence and mortality trends since the early 1980s, age patterns for selected cancers, international comparisons and selected 1998 and 1999 incidence data are features of this report. The information in this report is supported by more detailed information for all cancer sites on the Institute's web site. Cancer in Australia 1997 is an important reference from the Cancer Series for all those interested in the health of Australians.

Cervical screening in Australia 1997-1998

The National Cervical Screening Program has developed a set of key performance and outcome indicators to monitor Program achievements. This publication is the second annual report of the Program and presents data and analysis for 1997-1998. The report includes three new periodic indicators that broaden its scope and add substantially to the information available on cervical cancer screening in Australia. These are incidence and mortality by location (rural, remote, metropolitan) and mortality by Indigenous status. Where possible, State and Territory comparisons are also provided.

BreastScreen Australia, achievement report 1997 and 1998

Describes comprehensive, national data on breast cancer screening in Australia. Features include information about BreastScreen Australia Program activities and performance indicators for 1997 and 1998. This second national report is a joint production by BreastScreen Australia, the AIHW, and the Commonwealth Department of Health and Aged Care.

Morbidity of Vietnam veterans: suicide in Vietnam Veterans' children, supplementary report 1

Analyses suicide patterns among Vietnam veterans' children highlighting time trends, age and sex distribution, location and method of suicide.It is a supplementary report to Morbidity of Vietnam Veterans: Volume 3 Validation Study which recommended that suicide in veterans' children be further investigated and the result drawn to the attention of the Vietnam Veterans Counselling Service.This report extend the knowledge about the health of Vietnam veterans and their families.

Cancer in Australia 1996: incidence and mortality data for 1996 and selected data for 1997 and 1998

Cancer in Australia 1996 presents comprehensive national data on cancer incidence and mortality. The report provides 1996 and selected 1997 and 1998 data for cancers by site, age and sex, and summary data for each State and Territory. Incidence and mortality trends since the early 1980s, age patterns for selected cancers and international comparisons are features of this report. The information in this report is supported by more detailed information for all cancer sites on the Institute's Internet web site.

Breast cancer in Australian women 1982-1996

Provides the latest national information about breast cancer in Australian women and updates the information provided in Breast Cancer in Australian Women 1921-1994. The report presents a series of graphs and tables detailing the numbers of new cases of, and deaths due to, breast cancer, the changing patterns of incidence and mortality over time, and variations between States and Territories and urban and rural areas. It is part of the AIHW's Cancer Series and was commissioned by the National Health and Medical Research Council's National Breast Cancer Centre.

Cancer in Australia 1995: incidence and mortality data for 1995 and selected data for 1996

Cancer in Australia 1995 presents comprehensive national data on cancer incidence and mortality. The report provides 1995 and selected 1996 data for cancers by site, age and sex, and summary data for each State and Territory. Incidence and mortality trends since the early 1980s and age patterns for selected cancers are features of this report. More detailed information can be found at the Institutes web site.

Breast and cervical cancer screening in Australia 1996-1997

This report is the first to present national data on breast and cervical cancer screening in Australia. It presents data based on a new set of indicators for breast and cervical cancer screening from BreastScreen Australia and the National Cervical Screening Program. Data on current status, trends over time, and State and Territory comparisons are also provided wherever possible. Breast and cervical cancer screening in Australia 1996-1997 is a joint project between the AIHW, the Commonwealth Department of Health and Aged Care, BreastScreen Australia and the National Cervical Screening Program. It is a valuable addition to the AIHW's Cancer Series.

Breast cancer survival in Australian women 1982-1994

Presents national information about the improved survival of Australian women diagnosed with breast cancer. The report includes relative survival estimates by age at diagnosis, year and period of diagnosis, State or Territory of usual residence, and urban and rural areas. Breast cancer survival in Australian women 1992-1994 was commissioned by the national Health and Medical Research Council's National Breast Cancer Centre. It is an important reference for all those interested in the health of Australians.

Health system costs of cancer in Australia 1993-94

Gives detailed estimates of the health system costs for each type of cancer by sex, age group and health sector for 1993-94. Also included are detailed estimates of the numbers of hospital admissions, bed days, non-inpatient services, medical services, drug prescriptions and nursing home residents for that year.

Disease costing methodology used in the disease costs and impact study 1993-94

Describes in detail the methodology used by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare to measure health services use and expenditure for specific diseases and disease groups in Australia in 1993-94. A companion report, Health System Costs of Diseases and Injury in Australia 1993-94, provides estimates of the health system costs for each disease and injury group and area of expenditure. Other reports will provide detailed estimates for specific National Health Priority Areas - cancer, cardiovascular disease, injury, mental health and diabetes.

NHPA report on cancer control 1997

The NHPA Report on Cancer Control 1997 updates the data and trends provided in the First Report on National Health Priority Areas 1996 for the priority cancers, summarises the current status of cancer control in Australia and proposes a framework for future collaborative action between all stakeholders. The report has been jointly published by the Commonwealth Department of Health and Family Services and the AIHW.

Cancer in Australia 1991-1994 (with projections to 1999)

Presents comprehensive national data on cancer incidence and mortality. The report provides 1994 data for selected cancers by cancer type, age and sex, and summary data for each State and Territory. More detail for all cancer types for the years 1991 to 194 is available on the accompanying disk and on the Institute's Internet web site. Incidence and mortality trends since the early 1980s for selected cancers are features of the report and are accompanied by age distribution data. The report also includes projections to 1999 for the most common cancers.

Australia's health 1998

Australia's Health 1998 is Australia's authoritative source of information on patterns of health and illness, the supply and use of health services, and health services costs and performance. As part of its comprehensive coverage of health issues, this 1998 edition reports specifically on the nation's five health priority areas - cancer control, cardiovascular health, injury prevention and control, mental health and diabetes.

First report on the national health priority areas, full report

Focuses on the health of Australians by documenting progress towards goals and targets for the five priority areas of cardiovascular health, cancer control, injury prevention and control, mental health, and diabetes mellitus.

Breast cancer in Australian women 1921-1994

This report presents a series of graphs and statistical information which detail the numbers of cases of an death due to breast cancer, the changing patterns of incidence and mortality rates over time, variations between States and Territories, and the risks to selected population groups.

Health differentials among young Australian adults

This report is an important reference that gives information on broad health indicators covering mortality, handicap, disability, perceived health status, illness and accident rates and health service use and on specific health problems such as suicide, motor vehicle traffic accidents, drug dependence, cancers, epilepsy, deafness, smoking and risk drinking.Health differentials among young Australian adults is the fourth and last report in the Health Monitoring Series that systematically documents health differentials in Australia using national population health and mortality data relating to the late 1980s. This report shows that there are clear differentials in the health of young Australians aged 15-24 years according to socioeconomic status, whether the measures of disadvantage are based on family income, education, employment status, or socioeconomic disadvantage of area.

Cancer in Australia 1989-1990 (with projections to 1995)

Contains nearly 200 pages of cancer incidence and mortality data for 1989 and 1990, with projections to 1995. Overviews and summary tables are presented for each year, highlighting interesting or significant observations from the data. Graphs show age-specific rates and international comparisons for the most common cancers. The bulk of the tables presented are for the most common cancer types, showing age-specific, crude, and age-standardised incidence and mortality rates for males, females and persons. Also included are estimates of the lifetime risk of contracting each type of cancer, the person-years of life lost, and the proportion that each cancer accounts for among all cancers. Five-year average age-standardised incidence and mortality rates, numbers of new cases and deaths are also provided for each State and Territory.

Cervical cancer in Australia

Cervical Cancer in Australia brings together research findings, previously published data and new information to describe the patterns of cervical cancer in Australia.

Cancer mortality in migrants to Australia 1979-88

Using 49 figures and 93 tables, this report describes the patterns of cancer mortality in migrants to Australia compared with those in the Australian-born population. The report provides details on the most common causes of death among the 24 largest migrant groups and compares these cancer death rates with those for other migrant groups and with rates in the migrants' countries or origin.

Potential opportunity cost savings in health care expenditure

This paper provides estimates of the economic cost of disease that are relevant to the focus areas of the National Health Goals and Targets. These focus areas are cardiovascular disease (CVD), cancer, mental health and injury.

Pap smear examinations under Medicare 1984-5 to 1992-93

This report presents statistics for pap smears derived from Medicare data over the period 1984-5 and 1992-3.

Vietnam Service, Dapsone Use and Cancer

Cancer in Australia 1986-1988

Contains over 200 pages of cancer incidence and mortality data for 1986, 1987 and 1988. Overviews and summary tables are presented for each year, highlighting interesting or significant observations from the data. Graphs show age-specific rates and international comparisons for the most common cancers.

Dapsone exposure, Vietnam service and cancer incidence summary

Complements Dapsone Exposure, Vietnam Service and Cancer Incidence with two smaller studies.

Issues in cervical cancer screening and treatment: new technologies and costs of alternative management strategies

This report has been prepared at the request of the National Task Force on Cervical Cancer Screening to assist in the development of national programs for screening and follow-up treatment.

Cost study on management protocols for women with abnormal pap smears

This report was prepared for the National Taskforce for the Prevention of Cancer of the Cervix, and to assist the NHMRC Working Party on the Management of Women with Abnormalities Detected in Cervical Cancer Screening. Costs have been prepared from the perspective of government as the financing authority, and do not include costs to women participating in the program.

Issues of cervical cancer screening and treatment: New technologies and costs of alternative management strategies

This report has been prepared at the request of the National Task Force on Cervical Cancer Screening to assist in the development of national programs for screening and follow-up treatment.

Dapsone exposure: Vietnam service and cancer incidence

A report to the Scientific Advisory Committee to the Minister for Veterans' Affairs. Aims to assess and quantify any association between cancer incidence and exposure to dapsone and to Vietnam service among Australian Army personnel who served in Vietnam during the Vietnam conflict.

Cancer in Australia 1983-85

Contains 157 pages of cancer incidence and mortality data for 1983, 1994 and 1985 respectively. Overviews and summary tables are presented for each year, highlighting interesting or significant observations from the data.

Cervical cancer screening in Australia: options for change

Summarises policy aspects of developing national strategies for extensive cervical cancer screening programs within Australia.

Screening mammography technology

This report was prepared in response to a request from the Breast Cancer Screening Evaluation Coordination Committee of the Australian Health Ministers' Advisory Council. It was intended as a guide to assist in future decisions on equipment for screening mammography.

Breast cancer screening in Australia: future directions

This report is the principal outcome of the national evaluation of breast cancer screening pilot projects. It makes detailed recommendations about the policy aspects of developing a national breast cancer screening program for Australia.

Screening mammography services

A report by the National Health Technology Advisory Panel (NHTAP).

Cancer in Australia 1982

This publication presents for the first time national estimates of cancer incidence in Australia. It has been produced jointly by the AIHW and the Australasian Association of Cancer Registries.

Cancer in Australia: an overview 2012

Online version of Cancer in Australia: an overview 2012.