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Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) among children and young people with type 1 diabetes

This fact sheet provides the most recent available data on hospitalisations for diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA)—a serious complication of diabetes. It highlights that DKA continues to affect many children and young people with type 1 diabetes, in particular females and those living in regional and remote areas and in lower socioeconomic areas.

Healthy Futures—Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services Report Card 2016

This report card provides information from about 140 Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHS) providing care to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians. During 2014–15 these services saw about 275,000 Indigenous clients who received almost 2.5 million episodes of care.About 228,700 Indigenous Australians were regular clients of ACCHSs, where they received maternal and child health services, chronic disease risk factor prevention, and management services. This report card shows rises in the proportion of clients receiving appropriate processes of care for 10 of the 16 relevant indicators.

Poisoning in children and young people 2012–13

This report provides information about children and young people aged 0–24 who were hospitalised as a result of poisoning in Australia. Almost half (49%) of all cases occurred among 18–24 year olds and a quarter among 15–17 year olds (26%). The highest rate of poisoning by pharmaceuticals was seen in 15–17 year old girls (589 cases per 100,000). The majority (37%) of these cases were caused by non-opioid analgesics (for example, ibuprofen and paracetamol).

Child protection Australia 2014–15

This report contains comprehensive information on state and territory child protection and support services in 2014-15, and on the characteristics of Australian children within the child protection system. This report shows that: 151,980 children, a rate of 28.6 per 1,000 children, received child protection services (investigation, care and protection order and/or were in out-of-home care)three-quarters (73%) of these children had previously been the subject of an investigation, care and protection order and/or were in out-of-home careAboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children were 7 times as likely as non-Indigenous children to be receiving child protection services.

The views of children and young people in out-of-home care: overview of indicator results from a pilot national survey 2015

This bulletin presents an overview of results from a 2015 national pilot data collection on the views of children in out-of-home care. Key findings include 91% of children reporting feeling both safe and settled in their current placement; 97% reporting that they had an adult who cares about what happens to them now and in the future; and 67% reporting that they usually get to have a say in what happens to them, and that people usually listen to what they say.

Hospitalised injuries in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and young people: 2011–13

This report provides information about hospitalised injuries among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and young people (0 to 24 years). The most common specific cause of injury among Indigenous children and young people was a fall (24%). Assault was the leading cause of hospitalisation for Indigenous people aged 15–17 and 18–24 years.

Adoptions Australia 2014–15

Adoptions Australia 2014–15, the 25th report in the series, presents the latest data on adoptions of Australian children and children from overseas, and highlights important trends in the number of adoptions back to 1990–91. During 2014–15, 292 adoptions were finalised across Australia—72% were children from Australia and 28% were from overseas, with 27% of all adoptees coming from Asia. Adoption of Australian children by carers, such as foster parents, comprised 32% of all adoptions.

Developing a linked data collection to report on the relationships between child protection and youth justice supervision

Using available national data to understand the characteristics of children and young people who are both in the child protection system and under youth justice supervision, and their pathways through these systems, would assist support staff, case workers and policy makers to achieve optimal outcomes for children and young people and for their families. This report describes how these data collections can be linked and how the relationships between child protection and youth justice supervision can be explored.

Educational outcomes for children in care: linking 2013 child protection and NAPLAN data

This report presents a snapshot of the academic performance of Australian children in the care of child protection services in 2013. Findings are based on the linkage of data from the Child Protection National Minimum Data Set and the National Assessment Program—Literacy and Numeracy. This report shows that the proportion of children in care meeting the national minimum standards (NMS) for literacy and numeracy varied (ranging from 44% to 83% across assessment domains and year levels).

Prevalence of type 1 diabetes among children aged 0–14 in Australia 2013

Prevalence of type 1 diabetes among children aged 0–14 in Australia 2013 presents the first national picture of children aged 0–14 living with type 1 diabetes in Australia. The report, based on data from the National (insulin-treated) Diabetes Register, highlights that in 2013, 6,091 children aged 0–14 had type 1 diabetes in Australia. This represented 139 cases per 100,000 population, or about 1 in 720 Australians aged 0–14. About 2 in 5 children with type 1 diabetes used an insulin pump to administer insulin. The prevalence of type 1 diabetes among children differed by age, state/territory, and residential remoteness areas.

Development of a national education and training data standards strategy and implementation plan

The Australian Institute of Health and Welfare developed a national data standards strategy and implementation plan to enhance the comparability, quality and coherence of information across the Australian education and training sectors, including early childhood education, school education, vocational education and training (VET) and higher education. This project report summarises the activities and process undertaken over 12 months from October 2013 to develop the strategy and implementation plan.

Child protection Australia 2013–14

This report contains comprehensive information on state and territory child protection and support services in 2013-14, and the characteristics of Australian children within the child protection system. This report shows that: - around 143,000 children, a rate of 27.2 per 1,000 children, received child protection services (investigation, care and protection order and/or in out-of-home care); - three-quarters (73%) of these children had previously been the subject of an investigation, care and protection order and/or out-of-home care placement; - Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children were 7 times as likely as non-Indigenous children to be receiving child protection services.

Hearing health outreach services to Indigenous children and young people in the Northern Territory 2012–13 and 2013–14

This report presents analyses on hearing health outreach services provided to Indigenous children and young people in the Northern Territory, funded through the Australian Government in 2012–13 and 2013–14. It reports the number and proportion of children and young people who received outreach audiology, ENT teleotology, and Child Hearing Health Coordinator services, as well as information about the hearing status and middle ear conditions among service recipients. Of the 2,854 children and young people who received audiology services between July 2012 and June 2014, hearing loss was present in 51% at their latest service; however, among those who received 2 or more of these services, there were functional improvements in hearing over time.

National outcome measures for early childhood development—phase 2: scoping paper

This report presents the results of Phase 2 of the National Outcome Measures for Early Childhood Development project. It identifies potential indicators for 5 indicator topic areas (child behavioural problems, peer relationships, racism, school engagement and parenting quality/capacity) and potential data sources for a further 2 (social and emotional wellbeing, and family social networks).

Adoptions Australia 2013-14

Adoptions Australia 2013–14, the 24th report in the series, presents the latest data on adoptions of Australian children and children from overseas, and highlights important trends in the number of adoptions back to 1989–90. Data cover characteristics of adopted children, their parents and adoptive families, as well as applications and vetoes for contact and information exchange, and intercountry adoption processing times. During 2013–14, 317 adoptions were finalised across Australia. Among these adoptions: –64% were children from Australia and 36% were from overseas –28% were by carers, such as foster parents –32% of adoptees came from Asia –45% of adoptees were aged under 5.

Stronger Futures in the Northern Territory: oral health services July 2012-December 2013

The report presents data on the Stronger Futures in the Northern Territory Oral Health Program. From July 2012 to December 2013 approximately 3,700 Indigenous children received full-mouth fluoride varnish applications; 2,100 received fissure sealants; and 4,700 were provided with clinical services. Forty one percent of children had untreated caries; the mean dmft score for children aged 6 was 5.3, and the mean DMFT score for 12 year olds was 2.1. Between 2009 and 2013 the proportion of children with caries experience decreased in most age groups, in particular for 1–3 year olds, where the proportion dropped from 73% to 56%.

SCSEEC successful school attendance strategies evidence-based project: literature review

This report reviews the available evidence on effective strategies for improving attendance among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students.  Analysis of this literature yielded nine types of strategies or interventions with demonstrated evidence of effectiveness. The report discusses each of these strategies, presenting examples of successful programs and the mechanisms that appear to underpin their effectiveness.

SCSEEC successful school attendance strategies evidence-based project: final report

This report presents detailed findings from the SCSEEC Successful School Attendance Strategies Evidence-based Project. Bringing together information from a literature review and a series of consultations with schools, it presents key lessons for developing and implementing effective strategies for improving school attendance among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students.

SCSEEC successful school attendance strategies evidence-based project: summary report

This report presents detailed findings from the SCSEEC Successful School Attendance Strategies Evidence-based Project. Bringing together information from a literature review and a series of consultations with schools, it presents key lessons for developing and implementing effective strategies for improving school attendance among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students.

Developing the National Early Childhood Development Researchable Data Set

This information paper outlines the processes undertaken towards establishing the National Early Childhood Development Researchable Data Set. This data set aims to link health and education data, using both jurisdictional and national data sources, which would provide a valuable resource to researchers and policy-makers. The paper documents the privacy, legislative and data custodianship and supply hurdles encountered during the initial stages of establishing this data set. The paper concludes with a pragmatic approach for the next steps and way forward.

Hospitalised injury in children and young people 2011-12

The aim of this report is to provide information about serious hospitalised injury in Australian children and young people aged 0 to 24 years. The report takes a developmental stage approach to examining injury acknowledging that age and injury are more closely linked at some periods of life (for example, early childhood and young adulthood).

A new approach to national child protection data: implementation of the Child Protection National Minimum Data Set

Over the past few years, the AIHW, with dedicated national resources made available through the Australian Government, has worked with all jurisdictions to implement a new Child Protection National Minimum Data Set (CP NMDS) for reporting on child protection. This working paper describes the development and implementation of the CP NMDS and highlights key new analyses able to be reported for the first time at the national level. It also outlines the need for ongoing development work.

Child protection Australia 2012-13

Child protection Australia 2012–13 represents a significant milestone in national child protection reporting as it is the first time that unit record level data have been available for analysis and reporting. This report shows that:- there were 135,000 children, a rate of 26.1 per 1,000 children, receiving child protection services (investigation; care and protection order; and/or placed in out-of-home care).- more than half (56%) of these children were subject only to an investigation (that is, they were not subsequently placed on an order or in out-of-home care) while 8% were involved in all three components of the system.- in 2012–13, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children were 8 times as likely as non-Indigenous children to be receiving child protection services.

Indigenous child safety

Indigenous children are over represented in areas where child safety and security are compromised. This report shows that Indigenous children aged 0–17 have higher rates of hospitalisations and deaths due to injury than non Indigenous children; are more likely to be victims of child abuse, neglect and sexual assault; and are over represented in homelessness and youth justice statistics.

Child social exclusion and health outcomes: a study of small areas across Australia

This bulletin examines the association between the risk of child social exclusion and children’s health outcomes in Australia at the small-area level. The results show that Australian children living in areas with a relatively high risk of social exclusion also experience relatively poor health outcomes. As the risk of child social exclusion increases, so do the rates of both potentially preventable hospitalisations and avoidable deaths.

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