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Child protection Australia 2010–11

This report contains comprehensive information on state and territory child protection and support services, and the characteristics of Australian children within the child protection system. Key findings include: since 2009-10, the number of children subject to a notification decreased by 13% from 187,314 to 163,767; since 2006-07, the number of children subject to a substantiation of a notification has decreased by 7% from 34,028 to 31,527 (6.9 to 6.1 per 1,000 children); the number of children in out-of-home care has increased by 5% from 35,895 in 2010 to 37,648 in 2011.

Changes in child toothbrushing over time

The proportion of children brushing their teeth less than once a day, among children when they start brushing with toothpaste, almost doubled between 1993 and 2000. The proportion brushing with low-fluoride children's toothpaste, as is recommended for children aged 6 years or under, has increased. The inappropriate eating or licking of toothpaste has increased, both when children start brushing and at 5 years of age.

Dental decay among Australian children

The Child Dental Health Survey 2005-06 provides information on the oral health of children attending school dental services in Australia, and shows that decay is relatively common in Australian children. Nearly half children aged 5-6 years (48.7%) had a history of dental decay in the deciduous teeth (also known as baby teeth). Likewise, nearly half of children aged 12 years (45.1%) had a history of decay in the permanent teeth. Young children from the lowest socioeconomic areas had about 70% more dental decay than children from the highest socioeconomic areas.

Headline indicators for children's health, development and wellbeing, 2011

This report provides the latest available information on how Australia's children aged 0-12 years are faring according to the Children's Headline Indicators-19 priority areas covering health status, risk and protective factors, early learning and care, and family and community environments. The Children's Headline Indicators are designed to help guide and evaluate policy development by measuring progress on agreed priority areas for children, and have been endorsed by Ministerial Councils for health, community and disability services, and education. Australian children are faring well, but results vary between states and territories, and across particular population groups, such as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children, and those in remote or socioeconomically disadvantaged areas. It is clear, therefore, that there is scope for further gains across a number of indicators.

National outcome measures for early childhood development: development of indicator based reporting framework

The Council of Australian Governments released the National Early Childhood Development Strategy, Investing in the Early Years in July 2009. The ECD Outcomes Framework in the strategy focuses on what Australia needs to achieve to fulfil the vision that 'by 2020 all children have the best start in life to create a better future for themselves and for the nation'. The early years of a child's life lays the foundation for future health, development, learning and wellbeing. This report outlines the process of developing an indicator-based reporting framework for early childhood development, and establishes a recommended high-level set of indicators to measure progress against the ECD Outcomes Framework in the strategy. It presents the results of a review of existing national and international frameworks related to early childhood development; research evidence on aspects of early childhood development most strongly associated with child health, development and wellbeing outcomes; and outlines the selection process for identifying indicators.

Substantiated child abuse falls in 2010

The number of Australian children subject to a substantiation of a notification of child abuse or neglect has declined, according to a report released today by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW).

Child protection Australia 2009-10

This report contains comprehensive information on state and territory child protection and support services, and the characteristics of Australian children within the child protection system. Across Australia in 2009-10 over 187,000 children were the subject of a child protection notification; just over 31,000 children were the subject of a substantiation; around 37,000 children were on care and protection orders; almost 36,000 children were living in out-of-home care; and there were almost 8,050 foster carer households.

Final report on the development of the Children's Services National Minimum Data Set

This is the final report of the Children's Services Data Working Group on the development of the Children's Services National Minimum Data Set (CSNMDS). It describes the background to the CSNMDS, its development, testing and final approval. It also includes the Final Children's Services National Minimum Data Set Specifications.

Trends in the affordability of child care services 1991-2004

Changes in the affordability of child care have implications for many areas of policy. From an adult's perspective, it affects balancing work and family, participation in the labour force, participation in education and training, and community involvement. From a child's perspective, it affects equitable access for all children to opportunities to learn and develop through formal care.

Counting kids: developing a new national collection for childcare and preschool services

A number of organisations currently collect information on children's services. All of these data collections are undertaken at different times, collect different information and use different data definitions. While there is some duplication of information across the collections, there are also notable gaps, and no single collection or combination of collections, is able to provide an accurate measure of the number and proportion of children who attend child care and/or preschool. Therefore, despite a high level of government and community interest in the provision of children's services and the number of children who use them, no one data collection currently exists which gives a comprehensive and comparable picture of children's services in Australia. This bulletin identifies the requirements needed for developing a new national collection for child care and preschool services.

Trends in long day care services for children in Australia, 1991-99

The report provides comprehensive information on Commonwealth supported long day care services (long day care centres and family day care services) during the 1990s - a period in which there was enormous growth in the number of service providers and in children using these services.Detailed information is presented on service provision, such as the supply of places for young children, access to preschool programs, hours of service operation, and fees charged. Characteristics of children's use of long day care services are examined, including age, the amount of time children spend in care, and the reasons they are in care. The report also discusses staffing of services, particularly the qualifications and training levels of workers.

Report on the field testing of the proposed children's services National Minimum Data Set

Current until 10 December 2002. This is a report on the first stage of the development of a National Minimum Data Set (NMDS) for children’s services (child care and preschool services) in Australia. It specifically reports on a field test of the data elements contained in the data manual (Version 1.0) as endorsed by the National Community Services Information Management Group (NCSIMG) Children’s Services Data Working Group. However, as a result of issues identified during discussions of the data elements, the report goes beyond the field test, to examine more fundamental issues relating to the structure of the NMDS.

Trends in the affordability of child care services

Current until 1 May 2002. This working paper examines changes in affordability over time for different types of families at different income levels using long day care services.

Outside school hours care services in Australia 1994-97

Focuses on 'outside school hours care services' which are provided for school age children, mainly of primary school age (5-12 years), at times when school is not in session - before school, after school, on 'pupil free days' and during school vacations. Current until 30 June 2001.

Comparison of data items in selected children's services collections

This report was prepared by the AIHW in collaboration with the Commonwealth Department of Family and Community Services. The report explores issues associated with the development of a national minimum data set for children's services through a detailed examination of four Australian children's services data collections and other relevant national data collections or definitions.

Trends in long day care services for children in Australia 1991-95

Presents an overview of the changes occurring from 1991 to 1995 in the provision and use of long day care services in Australia, and additional information about these services in 1995. Data for this overview have come mainly from censuses conducted by the Children's Services Program (CSP) of the Commonwealth Department of Family and Community Services, which provides the funding for these services. Current until 1 November 1999.

Children's services in Australia 1996: services for children under school age

This report outlines the structure, funding, administration and regulation of preschool services and of child care services in Australia for children under school age, as of 30 June 1996.

Outside school hours care services in Australia 1996

This report outlines the structure, funding, administration and regulation of before school care, after school care, and vacation care services for children in Australia, as at June 1996. It focuses on the responsibilities of the Commonwealth Government in the provision and delivery of these services.

Child care workers

Provides a profile of workers employed in child care services funded by the Commonwealth Government through the Children's Services Program (CSP).

Australia's welfare 1993: services and assistance

The first biennial report of the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare on Australia's welfare services and assistance. This report is the first major attempt to describe the provision of welfare services in Australia and contains information on four main welfare service areas: housing assistance; children's services; aged care services; and disability services. The text is backed by 27 charts, 134 tables and 10 special information boxes. A comprehensive index and extensive reference lists are also included.

Child abuse and neglect Australia 1991-92

Presents statistics on notifications of child abuse and neglect made to State and Territory community service departments in the 1991-92 financial year.