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Healthy Futures—Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services Report Card 2016

This report card provides information from about 140 Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHS) providing care to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians. During 2014–15 these services saw about 275,000 Indigenous clients who received almost 2.5 million episodes of care.About 228,700 Indigenous Australians were regular clients of ACCHSs, where they received maternal and child health services, chronic disease risk factor prevention, and management services. This report card shows rises in the proportion of clients receiving appropriate processes of care for 10 of the 16 relevant indicators.

Incidence of end-stage kidney disease in Australia 1997–2013

The incidence of end-stage kidney disease is an important indicator of the health of the Australian population and valuable for health-care planning. End-stage kidney disease usually requires kidney replacement therapy to survive—either dialysis or a kidney transplant—but not all people with ESKD receive these treatments for a variety of reasons.This report builds on an established method for estimating the incidence of end-stage kidney disease and indicates that for every new case treated with dialysis or transplant there is one that is not. The incidence rates of end-stage kidney disease are highest among those aged 75 and over.

Impacts of chronic back problems

Chronic back problems are common conditions in Australia (16% of the total population) and cause of disability (28% of the total population with disability) in Australia. Chronic back problems can have a strong negative effect on a person’s quality of life, affecting their ability to participate in daily activities, work, family and social activities. This bulletin provides the latest detailed information on the impacts (in terms of quality of life and disability) of chronic back problems in Australia.

Cardiovascular disease, diabetes and chronic kidney disease—Australian facts: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

Cardiovascular disease, diabetes and chronic kidney disease—Australian facts is a series of 5 reports by the National Centre for Monitoring Vascular Diseases at the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare that describe the combined burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD), diabetes and chronic kidney disease (CKD).This report on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people presents up-to-date statistics on risk factors, prevalence, hospitalisation and deaths from these 3 chronic diseases. It examines age and sex characteristics and variations by geographical location and compares these with the non-Indigenous population.

Cardiovascular disease fact sheet: prevalence of heart failure in Western Australia

This fact sheet presents the prevalence of heart failure due to coronary heart disease (referred to as CHD-related heart failure) in Western Australia in 2010—that is, the number of people who had at least 1 hospital admission for CHD-related heart failure in the previous 10 years and were still alive on 30 June 2010.

Cardiovascular disease fact sheet: prevalence of coronary heart disease in Western Australia

This fact sheet presents the prevalence of CHD in Western Australia in 2010—that is, the number of people who had at least 1 hospital admission for CHD in the previous 10 years and were still alive on 30 June 2010.

Cardiovascular disease fact sheet: prevalence of stroke in Western Australia

This fact sheet presents the prevalence of stroke in Western Australia in 2010—that is, the number of people who had at least 1 hospital admission for stroke in the previous 10 years and were still alive on 30 June 2010.

Cardiovascular disease fact sheet: prevalence of valvular heart disease in Western Australia

This fact sheet presents the prevalence of 2 forms of valvular heart disease: rheumatic heart disease (RHD) and non-rheumatic valvular disease (non-RVD) in Western Australia in 2010—that is, the number of people who had at least 1 hospital admission for valvular heart disease in the previous 10 years and were still alive on 30 June 2010.

Acute kidney injury in Australia: a first national snapshot

Acute kidney injury (AKI) is increasing in incidence globally. This report presents the first national statistical snapshot on AKI and its impact in Australia. The key findings show that AKI accounts for a considerable number of hospitalisations and deaths and further, that the burden of this condition is not equally distributed across the Australian population. These inequalities were seen in relation to all population characteristics examined, namely sex and age, remoteness of residence, socioeconomic disadvantage and Indigenous status.

Better Cardiac Care measures for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people: first national report 2015

This is the first national report on the 21 Better Cardiac Care measures for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. It shows that: the age-standardised death rate due to cardiac conditions for Indigenous people was 1.6 times that for non-Indigenous people; mortality from cardiac conditions for Indigenous Australians decreased by 41% between 1998 and 2012, while access to cardiac care has improved over time.

Incidence of type 1 diabetes in Australia 2000–2013

Incidence of type 1 diabetes in Australia, 2000–2013 presents the latest available national data on new cases of type 1 diabetes from Australia’s National (insulin-treated) Diabetes Register. In 2013, there were 2,323 new cases of type 1 diabetes in Australia, equating to 11 cases per 100,000 population. This rate has remained relatively stable between 2000 and 2013, fluctuating between 10 and 13 cases per 100,000 population each year.

Back problems: musculoskeletal fact sheet

This fact sheet summarises information from the AIHW's online musculoskeletal compendium.

Osteoarthritis: musculoskeletal fact sheet

This fact sheet summarises information from the AIHW's online musculoskeletal compendium.

Osteoporosis: musculoskeletal fact sheet

This fact sheet summarises information from the AIHW's online musculoskeletal compendium.

Rheumatoid arthritis: musculoskeletal fact sheet

This fact sheet summarises information from the AIHW's online musculoskeletal compendium.

Respiratory medication use in Australia 2003–2013: treatment of asthma and COPD

This report describes patterns of dispensing of respiratory medications in Australia through detailed analyses of Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) data, as well as other sources, to draw inferences about respiratory medication use among patients with asthma and COPD. It provides a valuable update and new information about the use of medicines for asthma and COPD, thus improving our knowledge and understanding about how these diseases are managed in Australia.

Cardiovascular disease, diabetes and chronic kidney disease—Australian facts: risk factors

This report is a series of 5 reports by the National Centre for Monitoring Vascular Diseases at the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare that describe the combined burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD), diabetes and chronic kidney disease (CKD). This report on risk factors presents the latest statistics on the behaviours and characteristics that increase the likelihood of a person developing these chronic diseases. It also describes risk factors among people who already have CVD, diabetes or CKD. It examines age and sex characteristics and variations across population groups, including by geographical location and socioeconomic disadvantage.

Healthy Futures—Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services: report card

During 2012-13, Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHS) saw just over 250,000 Indigenous clients, who received about 2.1 million episodes of care.Over 210,000 Indigenous people were regular clients of ACCHS. This report shows increases in the proportion of clients receiving appropriate processes of care for ten of the 16 primary health care indicators.

Cardiovascular disease, diabetes and chronic kidney disease: Australian facts: morbidity—hospital care

Cardiovascular disease, diabetes and chronic kidney disease—Australian facts is a series of 5 reports by the National Centre for Monitoring Vascular Diseases at the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare that describes the combined burden of cardiovascular disease (including coronary heart disease and stroke), diabetes and chronic kidney disease.This report on Morbidity presents up-to-date statistics as well as trends on hospitalisations from these chronic diseases. It examines age and sex characteristics, and variations across population groups, including among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, by geographical location, and by socioeconomic disadvantage.

Cardiovascular disease, diabetes and chronic kidney disease: Australian facts: prevalence and incidence

Cardiovascular disease, diabetes and chronic kidney disease—Australian facts is a series of 5 reports by the National Centre for Monitoring Vascular Diseases at the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare that describe the combined burden of cardiovascular disease (including coronary heart disease and stroke), diabetes and chronic kidney disease.This report on prevalence and incidence provides a comprehensive summary of the latest available data on the prevalence and incidence in the Australian population of these three chronic vascular diseases, acting alone or together. It examines age and sex characteristics and variations across population groups, by geographical location, and by socioeconomic disadvantage.

Cardiovascular disease, diabetes and chronic kidney disease: Australian facts mortality

Cardiovascular disease, diabetes and chronic kidney disease—Australian facts is a series of 5 reports by the National Centre for Monitoring Vascular Diseases at the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare that describe the combined burden of cardiovascular disease (including coronary heart disease and stroke), diabetes and chronic kidney disease. This report on Mortality presents up-to-date statistics as well as trends on deaths from these chronic diseases. It examines age and sex characteristics, and variations across population groups, including among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, by geographical location, and by socioeconomic disadvantage.

Projections of the prevalence of treated end-stage kidney disease in Australia 2012-2020

End-stage kidney disease (ESKD) is the most severe form of chronic kidney disease with patients usually requiring kidney replacement therapy in the form of dialysis or kidney transplantation to survive. Projections of the prevalence of treated end-stage kidney disease in Australia presents national level projections of the number of people receiving kidney replacement therapy for their ESKD for the period 2012 to 2020. This information is important for predicting the future burden of ESKD in Australia.

National performance indicators to support neonatal hearing screening in Australia

Around half the children born with hearing impairment have no identified risk factor for the condition. It is widely acknowledged that delays in the identification and treatment of permanent childhood hearing impairment may profoundly affect quality of life in terms of language acquisition, social and emotional development, and education and employment prospects. All states and territories in Australia have universal neonatal hearing screening. This working paper presents a set of performance indicators for monitoring neonatal hearing screening activity in Australia at a national level. National evaluation and monitoring provides a measure of how well neonatal hearing screening is achieving its aims and objectives and will enable strengthening of screening practices and administrative processes to further improve outcomes for Australian infants.

Chronic kidney disease: regional variation in Australia

Chronic kidney disease is a common and serious problem in Australia and its management can be resource intensive, particularly for the most severe form of the disease: end-stage kidney disease. Rates of chronic kidney disease vary by geographic location.This report shows:people from Remote and very remote areas were 2.2 times more likely to die from chronic kidney disease than people from Major cities.people from Very remote areas were at least 4 times more likely to start kidney replacement therapy (dialysis or kidney transplant) than people from non-remote areas.

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