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The latest data about the incidence (the number of new cases) of insulin-treated diabetes from the National Diabetes Register are reported here and cover the period 2000 to 2009. During this period, 222,544 people began using insulin to treat their diabetes. Of these, 77% had Type 2 diabetes, 12% had gestational diabetes and 10% had Type 1 diabetes. The remaining 1% had other types of diabetes.

Due to problems with the quality of the data on gestational diabetes, there were no analyses for gestational diabetes undertaken with the 2009 National Diabetes Register. We expect that information on these cases may be included in future reports.

Key results

Type 1 diabetes

  • From 2000 to 2009 there were 9,308 new cases of Type 1 diabetes among children aged 0–14 years and 13,756 new cases of Type 1 diabetes among those aged 15+ years. This equates to an average of around 6 new cases per day over this period.
  • From 2000 to 2009, the average annual incidence rate of Type 1 diabetes was 11.5 cases per 100,000 population. 1
  • In 2009, the incidence rate of Type 1 diabetes among children aged 0–14 was 22 cases per 100,000 population compared with 19 cases per 100,000 in 2000. For those 15 years and over, the rate in 2009 at 7 cases per 100,000 was slightly lower than the rate in 2000, which was 10 per 100,000.
  • In most age groups, the incidence rate of Type 1 diabetes was higher for males than for females.

Type 2 diabetes

  • From 2000 to 2009, there were 172,246 new cases of insulin-treated Type 2 diabetes among those aged 10+ years.
  • The rate of new cases of insulin-treated Type 2 diabetes among those aged 10+ years was 117 per 100,000 population in 2009 compared with 74 per 100,000 in 2000. 

Incidence of Type 1 diabetes among children aged 0-14 years

From 2000 to 2009, the National Diabetes Register reported that there were 9,308 new cases of Type 1 diabetes among children aged 0–14 years—4,895 males and 4,413 females. This is equivalent to an average annual rate of 23 cases per 100,000 children, or more than two new cases per day over this period.

Incidence by age and sex

For all children, the rate of new cases of Type 1 diabetes increased with age. Over the period 2000 to 2009 and for children aged 0 to 4 years there were 15 cases per 100,000 children, for 5 to 9 year olds, 24 per 100,000 and 30 per 100,000 among 10 to 14 year olds.

Overall, males were more likely to be diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes than females; the rate for males was 24 new cases per 100,000 population and for females it was 22 new cases per 100,000.

Figure 1: Average annual incidence rate of Type 1 diabetes among children aged 0–14 years, by age at first insulin use and sex, 2000–2009

Incidence of T1 diabetes ages 0-14 GIF

Source: National Diabetes Register (data extracted June 2011).

Trends in incidence

By 2009 the overall incidence of Type 1 diabetes had increased in children aged 0–14 years compared to the rate in 2000. The rate was 22 new cases per 100,000 people in 2009 and 19 per 100,000 in 2000.

Figure 2: Incidence rate of Type 1 diabetes among children aged 0–14 years, by year of first insulin use, 2000–2009

Incidence of T1 diabetes ages 0-14 by year GIF

Note: Age-standardised to the 2001 Australian population.

Source: National Diabetes Register (data extracted June 2011).

However, most of the increase occurred between 2000 and 2004, when the rate increased by an average of 6.7% a year. Since 2004 there has been no significant change in the overall incidence rate for 0–14 year olds.

Figure 3: Trends in the incidence of Type 1 diabetes in children aged 0-14 years derived from Poisson regression modelling, 2000–2004, 2004–2009

Incidence of T1 diabetes ages 0-14 trends GIF

Source: National Diabetes Register (data extracted June 2011).

Changes in the incidence rate of Type 1 diabetes among children differed with age for the period 2000 to 2009, with those in older age groups showing a larger increase. The number of new cases of Type 1 diabetes in those aged 0–4 years had decreased slightly in 2009 compared with 2000. For those aged 5–9, there was a small change between 2000 and 2009—from 21 to 23 new cases per 100,000 children. In the 10–14 year age group the comparative figures were 24 per 100,000 and 30 per 100,000. 

Figure 4: Incidence rate of Type 1 diabetes among children aged 0–14 years, by year of first insulin use and age, 2000–2009

Incidence of T1 diabetes ages 0-14 by age GIF

Source: National Diabetes Register (data extracted June 2011).

Incidence by location

The average annual rate of new cases of Type 1 diabetes among children aged 0–14 in Australia was 23 per 100,000 children. The states of Victoria, Queensland and Western Australia had rates similar to the national average of 23 per 100,000 children. However, Tasmania, the Australian Capital Territory and South Australia had higher incidence rates of Type 1 diabetes than Australia as a whole (28, 27 and 26 new cases per 100,000 population respectively), while New South Wales had a lower incidence rate, at 21 per 100,000.

Figure 5: Average annual incidence rate of Type 1 diabetes for children aged 0–14 years, by state or territory of current residence, 2000–2009

Incidence of T1 diabetes ages 0-14 by state GIF

Notes
1. Age-standardised to the 2001 Australian population.
2. Data for the Northern Territory are not displayed due to data quality issues but are included in Australia.

Source: National Diabetes Register (data extracted June 2011).

Incidence of Type 1 diabetes among people aged 15 years and over

From 2000 to 2009 there were 13,756 new cases of Type 1 diabetes among persons aged 15 and over—8,508 males and 5,248 females. This corresponds to an average annual rate of 9 new cases per 100,000 population, or over 3 new cases per day over this period.

Incidence by age and sex

The incidence rate of Type 1 diabetes was higher for younger people than for older people. The average annual rate of new cases of Type 1 diabetes was highest among 15–24 year olds at 15 per 100,000 people, followed by 25–39 year olds at 11 per 100,000. The average annual rate was lowest among those aged 40 and over, at 5 per 100,000.

From 2000 to 2009, the incidence rate for Type 1 diabetes among those aged 15 and over was higher for males than for females across all age groups. For males it was 11 new cases per 100,000 population, while for females it was 6 new cases per 100,000.

Figure 6: Average annual incidence rate of Type 1 diabetes among people aged 15 years and over, by age at first insulin use and sex, 2000–2009

Incidence of T1 diabetes ages 15+ by age GIF

Sources: National Diabetes Register and AIHW analysis of de-identified NDSS data (data extracted June 2011).

Trends in incidence

There was a decrease in the incidence rate of Type 1 diabetes for those aged 15 years and over in 2009, compared with the rate in 2000. The largest decrease over this time was among those aged 40 and over, where there were 3 new cases per 100,000 population in 2009 compared with 8 new cases per 100,000 in 2000.

Figure 7: Incidence rate of Type 1 diabetes among people aged 15 years and over, by year of first insulin use and age at first insulin use, 2000–2009

Incidence of T1 diabetes ages 15+ GIF

Note: Age-standardised to the 2001 Australian population.

Sources: National Diabetes Register and AIHW analysis of de-identified NDSS data (data extracted June 2011).

Incidence by location

The average annual rate of new cases of Type 1 diabetes for those aged 15 and over for Australia was 8 new cases per 100,000 population. There was little variation in this rate by state or territory except for Western Australia and Tasmania where the rates were higher.

Figure 8: Average annual incidence rate of Type 1 diabetes among people aged 15 years and over, by state or territory of current residence, 2000–2009

Incidence of T1 diabetes, all ages by state GIF

Notes
1. Age-standardised to the 2001 Australian population.
2. Data for the Northern Territory are not displayed due to data quality issues but are included in Australia.

Source: National Diabetes Register (data extracted June 2011).

Incidence of insulin-treated Type 2 diabetes

This section presents the latest diabetes incidence statistics for people using insulin to treat Type 2 diabetes. Not all people with Type 2 diabetes need insulin for treatment and lifestyle modifications such as regular exercise and a healthy diet, along with medication, can often control Type 2 diabetes without the need for insulin. However, as the duration of diabetes and the age of the person with diabetes increases, many people with Type 2 diabetes will need to begin to use insulin.

The following data include only cases of Type 2 diabetes in those aged 10 years and over. Although there are cases of Type 2 diabetes in children younger than 10, these are uncommon. Most of the recorded cases of diabetes in young children are due to data errors and therefore statistics for this age group have not been reported.

Incidence by age and sex

From 2000 to 2009, there were 94,663 males and 77,583 females who began to use insulin to treat their Type 2 diabetes. The average annual rate of new cases over this period was 95 per 100,000 people. This was 108 new cases per 100,000 for males and 82 new cases per 100,000 for females.

Until the age of 85 years, the incidence of insulin-treated Type 2 diabetes increased as people got older. For those aged 10–14 the incidence was 3 per 100,000 people and for the 55–69 year age group it was 238 per 100,000.

Figure 9: Average annual incidence rate of insulin-treated Type 2 diabetes, by age at first insulin use and sex, 2000–2009

Incidence of T2 diabetes ages 15+ by sex GIF

Note: Excludes those aged less than 10 years.

Source: National Diabetes Register and AIHW analysis of de-identified NDSS data (data extracted July 2011)

Trends in incidence

In 2009, the rate of new cases of insulin-treated Type 2 diabetes was higher than in 2000. The incidence rate was 117 per 100,000 people in 2009 compared with 74 per 100,000 in 2000. The increase in the rate of new cases could be the result of an increase in the number of people with insulin-treated Type 2 diabetes registering with the National Diabetes Services Scheme or it may reflect an actual increase in the underlying number of cases of Type 2 diabetes treated with insulin, or a combination of these factors.

Over the period 2000 to 2009, there was a greater increase in the incidence of insulin-treated Type 2 diabetes for males compared with females. In 2009, the incidence rate of insulin-treated Type 2 diabetes was 138 per 100,000 males compared with 81 per 100,000 in 2000. For females, the incidence rate of insulin-treated Type 2 diabetes was 98 per 100,000 in 2009 compared with 67 per 100,000 in 2000.

Figure 10: Incidence rate of insulin-treated Type 2 diabetes among those aged 10 years and over, by sex, 2000–2009

Incidence of T2 diabetes ages 10+ trends GIF

Notes
1. Age-standardised to the 2001 Australian population.
2. Analysis of the population aged 10 years and over.

Sources: National Diabetes Register; AIHW analysis of de-identified NDSS data (data extracted June 2011)

Incidence by location

The average annual incidence rate of insulin-treated Type 2 diabetes over the period 2000 to 2009 for Australians aged 10 and over was 95 per 100,000 people; however this rate varied with the state or territory in which people lived. The incidence rate was highest for those living in New South Wales, at 101 per 100,000 population and lowest in the Australian Capital Territory at 71 new cases per 100,000 population.

Figure 11: Average annual incidence rate of insulin-treated Type 2 diabetes, by state or territory of current residence, 2000–2009

Incidence of T2 diabetes all ages by state GIF

Notes
1. Age-standardised to the 2001 Australian population.
2. Analysis of the population aged 10 years and over.
3. Data for the Northern Territory are not displayed due to data quality issues but are included in Australia.

Source: National Diabetes Register (data extracted June 2011).

Source data and methods

The source tables from which the charts in this section were created:

Information on the statistical methods used in the derivation of the data:

Data quality statement


Notes and corrections

The current version of the publication is presented above.

  1. (28 March 2012) Additional data relating to the incidence rate of Type 1 diabetes for all ages.