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Diabetes and chronic kidney disease as risks for other diseases: Australian Burden of Disease Study 2011

This report aims to provide a more comprehensive picture of the full health loss attributable to diabetes and chronic kidney disease (CKD). It quantifies the impact of diabetes and CKD on the burden of other diseases for which there is evidence of a causal association (‘linked diseases’) to estimate the indirect burden caused by these 2 diseases. It uses disease burden estimates from the Australian Burden of Disease Study 2011 and extends the standard approach for analysis of risk factors to model diabetes and CKD as risk factors. When the indirect burden due to linked diseases was taken into account, the collective burden due to diabetes was 1.9 times as high, and CKD was 2.1 times as high, as their direct burden.

Contribution of vascular diseases and risk factors to the burden of dementia in Australia: Australian Burden of Disease Study 2011

This report describes a range of modifiable vascular risk factors for dementia, and estimates their individual and combined contribution to the burden of dementia in Australia. Vascular risk factors in this study include smoking, physical inactivity, mid-life high blood pressure and mid-life obesity, as well as vascular diseases that act as risk factors for dementia—diabetes, stroke, atrial fibrillation and chronic kidney disease. It uses burden of disease estimates from the Australian Burden of Disease Study 2011 and evidence in the literature that shows a link between these vascular risk factors and development of dementia in later life. It shows that about 30% of the total dementia burden in Australia is due to the joint effect of the vascular risk factors examined; highlighting the potential for preventing dementia and reducing dementia-related burden.

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) among children and young people with type 1 diabetes

This fact sheet provides the most recent available data on hospitalisations for diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA)—a serious complication of diabetes. It highlights that DKA continues to affect many children and young people with type 1 diabetes, in particular females and those living in regional and remote areas and in lower socioeconomic areas.

Healthy Futures—Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services Report Card 2016

This report card provides information from about 140 Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHS) providing care to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians. During 2014–15 these services saw about 275,000 Indigenous clients who received almost 2.5 million episodes of care.About 228,700 Indigenous Australians were regular clients of ACCHSs, where they received maternal and child health services, chronic disease risk factor prevention, and management services. This report card shows rises in the proportion of clients receiving appropriate processes of care for 10 of the 16 relevant indicators.

Use of medicines by older people with type 2 diabetes

This report describes dispensing patterns of glucose lowering medicines and medicines for other conditions associated with diabetes in a concessional population cohort of Australians aged 65 and over diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. It uses linked data from the National Diabetes Services Scheme and the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme to explore medicine supply patterns in 2012 by age and time since diabetes diagnosis. It shows that, in general, the longer the time since diagnosis, the more likely it is that an individual would be supplied with all medicine types and the more intense their glucose lowering treatment regimens would be. This report highlights the complexity of pharmacological management in older people with type 2 diabetes and the diversity of medicine supply patterns in relation to age and time since diabetes diagnosis.

Incidence of insulin-treated diabetes in Australia 2014

Incidence of insulin-treated diabetes in Australia 2014 presents the latest available national data on new cases of insulin-treated diabetes from the 2014 National (insulin-treated) Diabetes Register.In 2014, nearly 30,000 Australians began using insulin to treat their diabetes—67% had type 2 diabetes, 23% had gestational diabetes, 9% had type 1 diabetes and 2% had other forms of diabetes.Almost 2 in 3 (63%) people diagnosed with type 1 diabetes were aged under 25, whereas almost all (93%) new cases of insulin-treated type 2 diabetes occurred in those aged over 40.

Cardiovascular disease, diabetes and chronic kidney disease—Australian facts: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

Cardiovascular disease, diabetes and chronic kidney disease—Australian facts is a series of 5 reports by the National Centre for Monitoring Vascular Diseases at the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare that describe the combined burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD), diabetes and chronic kidney disease (CKD).This report on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people presents up-to-date statistics on risk factors, prevalence, hospitalisation and deaths from these 3 chronic diseases. It examines age and sex characteristics and variations by geographical location and compares these with the non-Indigenous population.

Prevalence of type 1 diabetes among children aged 0–14 in Australia 2013

Prevalence of type 1 diabetes among children aged 0–14 in Australia 2013 presents the first national picture of children aged 0–14 living with type 1 diabetes in Australia. The report, based on data from the National (insulin-treated) Diabetes Register, highlights that in 2013, 6,091 children aged 0–14 had type 1 diabetes in Australia. This represented 139 cases per 100,000 population, or about 1 in 720 Australians aged 0–14. About 2 in 5 children with type 1 diabetes used an insulin pump to administer insulin. The prevalence of type 1 diabetes among children differed by age, state/territory, and residential remoteness areas.

Incidence of type 1 diabetes in Australia 2000–2013

Incidence of type 1 diabetes in Australia, 2000–2013 presents the latest available national data on new cases of type 1 diabetes from Australia’s National (insulin-treated) Diabetes Register. In 2013, there were 2,323 new cases of type 1 diabetes in Australia, equating to 11 cases per 100,000 population. This rate has remained relatively stable between 2000 and 2013, fluctuating between 10 and 13 cases per 100,000 population each year.

Cardiovascular disease, diabetes and chronic kidney disease—Australian facts: risk factors

This report is a series of 5 reports by the National Centre for Monitoring Vascular Diseases at the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare that describe the combined burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD), diabetes and chronic kidney disease (CKD). This report on risk factors presents the latest statistics on the behaviours and characteristics that increase the likelihood of a person developing these chronic diseases. It also describes risk factors among people who already have CVD, diabetes or CKD. It examines age and sex characteristics and variations across population groups, including by geographical location and socioeconomic disadvantage.

Cardiovascular disease, diabetes and chronic kidney disease: Australian facts: morbidity—hospital care

Cardiovascular disease, diabetes and chronic kidney disease—Australian facts is a series of 5 reports by the National Centre for Monitoring Vascular Diseases at the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare that describes the combined burden of cardiovascular disease (including coronary heart disease and stroke), diabetes and chronic kidney disease.This report on Morbidity presents up-to-date statistics as well as trends on hospitalisations from these chronic diseases. It examines age and sex characteristics, and variations across population groups, including among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, by geographical location, and by socioeconomic disadvantage.

National Key Performance Indicators for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander primary health care: results from December 2013

This is the second national report on the national Key Performance Indicators (nKPIs) data collection. It captures data from over 200 primary health care organisations that receive funding from the Australian Government Department of Health to provide services primarily to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. It presents data for 19 ‘process of care’ and ‘health outcomes’ indicators which focus on the prevention and management of chronic disease and maternal and child health. The report shows improvements against most of the ‘process of care’ indicators.

Cardiovascular disease, diabetes and chronic kidney disease: Australian facts: prevalence and incidence

Cardiovascular disease, diabetes and chronic kidney disease—Australian facts is a series of 5 reports by the National Centre for Monitoring Vascular Diseases at the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare that describe the combined burden of cardiovascular disease (including coronary heart disease and stroke), diabetes and chronic kidney disease.This report on prevalence and incidence provides a comprehensive summary of the latest available data on the prevalence and incidence in the Australian population of these three chronic vascular diseases, acting alone or together. It examines age and sex characteristics and variations across population groups, by geographical location, and by socioeconomic disadvantage.

Cardiovascular disease, diabetes and chronic kidney disease: Australian facts mortality

Cardiovascular disease, diabetes and chronic kidney disease—Australian facts is a series of 5 reports by the National Centre for Monitoring Vascular Diseases at the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare that describe the combined burden of cardiovascular disease (including coronary heart disease and stroke), diabetes and chronic kidney disease. This report on Mortality presents up-to-date statistics as well as trends on deaths from these chronic diseases. It examines age and sex characteristics, and variations across population groups, including among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, by geographical location, and by socioeconomic disadvantage.

Incidence of insulin-treated diabetes in Australia 2000-2011

Incidence of insulin-treated diabetes in Australia 2000–2011 presents the latest available national data on new cases of insulin-treated diabetes from Australia’s National Diabetes Register. In 2011, there were 2,367 new cases of type 1 diabetes in Australia, equating to 11 new cases per 100,000 population. This rate has remained stable over the last decade, with between 10 and 12 new cases per 100,000 population per year.

Type 2 diabetes in Australia's children and young people: a working paper

Type 2 diabetes in Australia's children and young people identifies and describes national data sources to monitor incidence and prevalence of type 2 diabetes in children and young people and assesses their suitability for this task. This working paper also presents, for the first time, national incidence and prevalence estimates of type 2 diabetes in Australia's children and young people.

Diabetes and disability: impairments, activity limitations, participation restrictions and comorbidities

The report examines the association between diabetes and disability in Australia using data from the Australian Bureau of Statistics' Survey of Disability, Ageing and Carers 2009. People with diabetes were twice as likely to have a disability (39% compared with 17%) and almost 3 times as likely to have a severe or profound limitation (14% compared with 5%) than people without diabetes. Among working-age people with diabetes and disability, 40% said they were permanently unable to work compared with 20% of people with a disability who did not have diabetes.People with diabetes reported higher rates of high blood pressure, high cholesterol, heart disease, stroke, depression, vision loss and kidney related disorders than people without diabetes.

Diabetes expenditure in Australia 2008-09

Between 2000-01 and 2008-09, health-care expenditure allocated to diabetes increased by 86% from $811 million to $1,507 million.The health-care sector where the largest increase took place was hospital admitted patients for which expenditure more than doubled in this period. Type 2 diabetes accounted for 60% of diabetes expenditure in 2008-09.

Diabetes among young Australians

Diabetes among young Australians is the first report from the National Centre for Monitoring Diabetes to examine the management and impact of diabetes in youth in Australia. Diabetes affects a considerable number of young people: in 2010, about 31,300 Australians aged 0-30 years with diabetes were registered with the National Diabetes Service Scheme. Most (79%) had Type 1 diabetes. This report explores how young Australians with diabetes are managing their condition, their use of health services and the diabetes-related health problems they experience.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander identification in community services data collections: an updated data quality report

This report examines the identification of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander clients in a number of Australian Institute of Health and Welfare community services data collections, by analysing where Indigenous status is missing/not stated. It makes a number of recommendations, including that data collection manuals and training materials reflect the National best practice guidelines for collecting Indigenous status in health data sets. Where necessary, jurisdictions should consider modifying client forms and client information management systems to ensure consistency with these guidelines.

Risk factor trends: age patterns in key health risk factors over time

This report presents comparisons over time for different age groups for key health risk factors, including overweight and obesity, physical inactivity, poor diet, smoking and excessive alcohol consumption. The good news is that smoking rates have declined, particularly among younger people. However, overweight/obesity rates have increased for virtually all age groups, especially females aged 12 to 44.

Insulin pump use in Australia

Insulin pump use in Australia explores the number, characteristics and experiences of insulin pump users, using information from the National Diabetes Services Scheme and the first national survey of insulin pump users, conducted by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare. In 2011, the proportion of Australians with Type 1 diabetes using an insulin pump was approximately 10%, representing an increase over previous years. Pump use was more common among females and people under 25 years, and for most pump users the benefits of pump use outweighed the problems.

Diabetes prevalence in Australia: detailed estimates for 2007-08

This report presents the most up-to-date estimates of the number of people with diagnosed diabetes in Australia based on self-reports to the Australian Bureau of Statistics' 2007-08 National Health Survey. The number of people with diabetes is presented by diabetes type, age, sex, state of usual residence and remoteness.

Diabetes and poor mental health and wellbeing: an exploratory analysis

Diabetes and poor mental health and wellbeing are both common health conditions in Australia and contribute substantially to the overall burden of disease.  A large proportion of people with diabetes are also living with poor mental health and wellbeing, with 41.6% of adult Australians with diabetes also reporting medium, high or very high levels of psychological distress. Australians with diabetes are significantly more likely than other Australians to have poor mental health and wellbeing.

Prevalence of Type 1 diabetes in Australian children, 2008

Type 1 diabetes is a serious, life-long disease which causes a major health, social and economic burden for individuals with the disease, their families and the community. Prevalence of Type 1 diabetes in Australian children, 2008 presents for the first time estimates of the prevalence of Type 1 diabetes in children aged 0-14 years in 2008, based on Australia's National Diabetes Register data.In 2008, it is estimated that over 5,700 children aged 0-14 years had Type 1 diabetes in Australia. The prevalence rate increased with age and varied by state and territory. Assuming that new cases of Type 1 diabetes in 0-14 year old children continue increasing at the rate observed between 2000 and 2008, it is estimated that the prevalence rate will increase by 10% between 2008 and 2013.

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