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Diabetes and disability: impairments, activity limitations, participation restrictions and comorbidities

The report examines the association between diabetes and disability in Australia using data from the Australian Bureau of Statistics' Survey of Disability, Ageing and Carers 2009. People with diabetes were twice as likely to have a disability (39% compared with 17%) and almost 3 times as likely to have a severe or profound limitation (14% compared with 5%) than people without diabetes. Among working-age people with diabetes and disability, 40% said they were permanently unable to work compared with 20% of people with a disability who did not have diabetes.People with diabetes reported higher rates of high blood pressure, high cholesterol, heart disease, stroke, depression, vision loss and kidney related disorders than people without diabetes.

Disability support services: services provided under the National Disability Agreement 2011-12

In 2011–12, Australian governments spent $6.9 billion on disability support services under the National Disability Agreement—an increase of 10% from the previous year. More than 317,600 people used services during this time—an increase of 1% from the previous year. The most common services users were people with intellectual, physical and psychiatric disabilities.

Incontinence in Australia

This report details the number of people who experienced severe incontinence in 2009, according to the Australian Bureau of Statistics' Survey of Disability, Ageing and Carers.  It includes estimates of prevalence rates and total expenditure on incontinence, as well as the number of primary carers of people suffering from the condition. It also updates data development since the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare's 2006 incontinence report.

Incontinence in Australia: prevalence, experience and cost

This bulletin reports on the number of people who experienced severe incontinence in 2009, according to the Australian Bureau of Statistics' Survey of Disability, Ageing and Carers. It also presents information on prevalence rates and how much was spent on incontinence (excluding residential aged care costs) in 2008-09. There were an estimated 316,500 people suffering from severe incontinence in 2009, most of whom were female (66%). As well, 73% of primary carers who assisted in managing another person's incontinence spent at least 40 hours each week caring or supervising.

Changes in life expectancy and disability in Australia 1998 to 2009

This report shows that older Australians are living longer and, on average, getting more years of life without severe or profound limitation in basic daily activities. On the other hand, the ageing of the Australian population and increasing longevity are leading to a greater number of older people with disability and severe or profound activity limitation.

Palliative care services in Australia 2012

Palliative care services in Australia is the first in a planned series of annual reports providing a detailed picture of the national response to the palliative care needs of Australians. Details from a range of data sources for 2009-10, and where available 2010-11, are presented, as are changes over time. There were almost 56,000 palliative care separations reported in public and private hospitals in 2009-10. Almost $3 million in Medicare Benefits Schedule payments was paid for palliative medicine specialist services in 2010-11.

Dementia in Australia

In 2011, there were an estimated 298,000 people with dementia. This number is expected to increase markedly over time, with projections suggesting it will reach around 400,000 by 2020 and 900,000 by 2050. Dementia is a leading cause of death, accounting for 6% of all deaths in 2010.  Total direct health and aged care services expenditure on people with dementia was at least $4.9 billion in 2009-10.

Disability support services: services provided under the National Disability Agreement 2010-11

In 2010-11, Australian governments spent $6.2 billion on a range of services under the National Disability Agreement (NDA). More than 314,000 people used disability support services provided under the NDA during this time, an increase of 7% from the previous year. Intellectual (30%), psychiatric (20%) and physical (17%) disabilities were the most common primary disabilities of service users. Most people needed some assistance in the activities of daily living (52%); independent living (60%); and work, education and community living (57%).

Younger people with disability in residential aged care: 2010-11

This bulletin presents data on the Younger People with Disability in Residential Aged Care (YPIRAC) initiative, which aims to reduce the number of people with disability aged under 65 who live in residential aged care. Between 2005-06 and 2010-11, an estimated 1,432 people have been helped, including 250 who have been moved out of residential aged care and into accommodation that better suits their situation, 244 who were successfully diverted away from entering residential aged care, and 456 who were provided with enhanced services while in residential aged care.

Program helps younger people with disability avoid residential aged care

An estimated 1,432 younger people with disability have been helped in the past 5 years by a program aimed at reducing the number of people with disability aged under 65 who live in residential aged care, according to a new

Disability support services 2009-10: report on services provided under the National Disability Agreement

Almost 300,000 people used services provided under the National Disability Agreement (NDA) in 2009-10, which accounted for nearly $5.8 billion of combined government expenditures.The number of disability service users rose by 47% between 2004-05 and 2009-10. The number of users of employment and respite services increased by 83% and 50%, respectively, over the same period. Of the nearly 2,300 disability service agencies operating in 2009-10, more than two-thirds were state or territory funded, the remaining being funded by the Australian Government.

Increase in use of disability services

The number of Australians using disability support services continues to increase, according to a report released today by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW).

The use of health services among Australians with disability

This bulletin is the second in a series about health of people with disability. It examines the use of health services among Australians with disabiilty based on national population health survey data.

High use of health services among Australians with disability

People with severe or profound disability rely up to 10 times as heavily on health services, such as general practitioners, as Australians without a disability, according to a report released today by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW).

Aussie men not taking action to manage their osteoporosis and osteoarthritis

Women are more likely than men to seek treatment for osteoporosis and osteoarthritis, a new report from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) has found.

Younger people with disability in residential aged care: update from the 2009-10 Minimum Data Set

This report presents data from the Younger People with Disability in Residential Aged Care (YPIRAC) program during its first four years of operation to 2009-10. An estimated 1,141 people aged less than 65 have been helped by the YPIRAC program over this time, including 139 people who have been moved out of residential aged care and into accommodation that better suits their situation, a further 207 who were successfully diverted away from entering residential aged care and over 400 people who were provided with enhanced services while in residential aged care.

Program helps younger people with disability find appropriate accommodation

An estimated 1,141 people have been helped by the Younger People with Disability in Residential Aged Care (YPIRAC) program during its four years of operation to 2009–10, according to a report released today by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW).

A snapshot of osteoporosis in Australia 2011

This snapshot brings together the latest data on osteoporosis in Australia. The purpose of the snapshot is to provide the latest statistical information in a timely and efficient manner.

Large increase in number of Australians using disability support services

The number of people using disability support services increased by almost 50% between 2003-04 and 2008-09, according to a report released today by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW).

Health of Australians with disability: health status and risk factors

This bulletin is the first in a series about health of Australians with disability. It examines how health problems affect health status of people with disability in Australia with a focus on prevalence and age at onset of some significant long term health conditions and relevant health risk factors and behaviours.

When musculoskeletal conditions and mental disorders occur together

The disability and chronic pain due to many musculoskeletal conditions may underlie the development or exacerbation of a variety of mental disorders. The report maps the extent of their relationship in the Australian population.

Younger People with Disability in Residential Aged Care Program: report on the 2008-09 Minimum Data Set

Younger People with Disability in Residential Aged Care Program: Report on the 2008-09 Minimum Data Set includes information from the 2008-09 younger People with Disability in Residential Aged Care Minimum Data Set (YPIRAC MDS). It summarises the characteristics of people who were 'on the books' during 2008-09 and the YPIRAC services they received.

Asthma among older people in Australia

Over 92% of the 402 asthma deaths in 2006 were among people aged 45 years and over. Asthma in older Australians is distinct in many ways. The presence of comorbid conditions makes the management of asthma in older people more complex. The disease itself is also more persistent and severe than in the younger ages.

Disability support services 2007-08: national data on services provided under the Commonwealth State/Territory Disability Agreement

Disability support services 2007-08 is a report on data collected as part of the Commonwealth State/Territory Disability Agreement National Minimum Data Set (CSTDA NMDS) between 1 July 2007 and 30 June 2008. The NMDS provides information relating to CSTDA-funded service outlets and users of these services, including support needs of users and informal care arrangements.The special focus chapter summarises some key characteristics of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people who used specialist disability services between 2003-04 and 2007-08.

Disability in Australia: multiple disabilities and need for assistance

The number and type of disabilities a person has is highly related to the severity of disability and need for assistance. This report examines the severity of disability and complex support needs of people with multiple disabilities in Australia. The analysis examines people with multiple disabilities in different age groups: children (0-14 years), people of working age (15-64 years) and older people (aged 65 years or over).

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