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Eye health in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

Over the age of 40 years, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have 6 times the rate of blindness of other Australians. 94% of vision loss in Indigenous Australians is preventable or treatable. The most common cause of blindness in Indigenous adults was cataract (32%).This paper summarises the findings of the 2008 National Indigenous Eye Health Survey (NIEHS). It reports the overall prevalence of blindness and vision impairment in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children aged 5 to 15 years and adults over the age of 40 years. The paper also presents some data from the National Trachoma Surveillance and Reporting Unit, Medicare, hospital data and case studies.

A guide to Australian eye health data, 2nd edition

A guide to Australian eye health data describes key Australian data collections which indicate the prevalence and outcomes of eye diseases and injuries and eye health care utilisation. It assesses how these collections inform the National Framework for Action to Promote Eye Health and Prevent Avoidable Blindness and Vision Loss.

Eye health labour force in Australia

The delivery of eye health care in Australia is undertaken by an eye health labour force that consists of ophthalmologists, ophthalmic nurses, optometrists, orthoptists, optical dispensers and optical mechanics. The number of full-time equivalent ophthalmologists, optometrists and orthoptists increased by 15%, 11% and 20% respectively between 2001 and 2006. Ophthalmologists are on average older than other eye health workers. In 2006 the average age of ophthalmologists was 52 years. The average age of the other eye health occupations ranged from 36 years (orthoptists) to 46 years (ophthalmic nurses).

Eye-related injuries in Australia

Reducing preventable vision loss has recently been identified as a priority by Australian governments and non-government organisations. Eye injuries in Australia is the third in a series of national reports providing an overview of eye health in Australia. This report presents eye injuries from the perspectives of hospitalisations, general practice consultations, emergency department attendances, workers' compensation claims, and also as reported in national surveys. This report is an invaluable resource for policy-makers, health professionals, advocacy groups and others interested in knowing more about eye injuries in Australia.

Eye health among Australian children

Reducing preventable vision loss has recently been identified as a priority by both Australian governments and non-government organisations. 'Eye health among Australian children' is the second in a series of national reports providing an overview of eye health in Australia. The report looks at the prevalence of eye problems among children, including vision disability, congenital anomalies and cancer. Statistics for children treated within the primary care sector, as well as in hospitals, are also presented. The report is an invaluable resource for policy-makers, health professionals, advocacy groups and others interested in knowing more about children's eye health.

Eye health in Australia: a hospital perspective

Reducing preventable vision loss has recently been identified as a priority by Australian governments and non-government organisations. Eye health in Australia: a hospital perspective is the first in a series of national reports providing an overview of eye health in Australia. The report presents information about the treatment of eye disorders in Australian hospitals. This includes trends in hospitalisations, differences across population groups, treatment costs, and waiting times. The report is a valuable resource for policy makers, health professionals, advocacy groups and others interested in knowing more about eye health in Australia.

A guide to Australian eye health data

A guide to Australian eye health data describes key Australian data collections which indicate the prevalence and outcomes of eye diseases and injuries and eye health care utilisation. It assesses how these collections inform the National Framework for Action to Promote Eye Health and Prevent Avoidable Blindness and Vision Loss. The report also presents a discussion on the key definitional issues surrounding eye health terminology and presents useful information for the development of future performance indicators in eye health.

Vision problems in older Australians

Visual impairment is an important health issue facing the present and future generations of older Australians because it can affect physical, functional, emotional and social wellbeing, and reduce quality of life. The main aim of this bulletin is to present the most reliable, robust and up-to-date estimates of the prevalence of major vision problems among older Australians. The prevalence of vision problems among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples is also reported. These estimates are important for use in planning prevention and treatment interventions. The bulletin also presents estimates from the range of Australian data sources available and reports on a number of data quality issues.

Eye injuries in the workplace:occurring while wearing recommended and approved eye protection

Examines eye injuries in the workplace occurring while wearing recommended and approved eye protection. Information was collected on the nature and pattern of injury, the task being undertaken, and the type and fit of eyewear used. A purpose-built measurement device was used to measure the shape of the faces of the injured workers and gaps around the eyewear were measured using digital photography.

Keeping an eye on eye protection

The Monitor is published approximately three times annually providing a clearinghouse for information about developments in injury surveillance and prevention.