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Australia's mothers and babies 2012

In 2012, 307,474 women gave birth to 312,153 babies in Australia. This was an increase of 10,343 births (3.4%) from that reported in 2011, and a total increase of 21.5% since 2003. Nationally, the proportion of teenage mothers (younger than 20) declined from 3.7% in 2011 to 3.6% in 2011, compared with 4.6% in 2003.

New Directions: Mothers and Babies Services: assessment of the program using nKPI data - December 2012 to December 2013

This report uses the maternal and child health measures in the national Key Performance Indicators on Indigenous primary health care to provide insights into the New Directions Mothers and Babies Services programme. The analyses found that there was an improvement in 7 out of 8 of these measures in organisations receiving New Directions funding.

Adoptions Australia 2013-14

Adoptions Australia 2013–14, the 24th report in the series, presents the latest data on adoptions of Australian children and children from overseas, and highlights important trends in the number of adoptions back to 1989–90. Data cover characteristics of adopted children, their parents and adoptive families, as well as applications and vetoes for contact and information exchange, and intercountry adoption processing times.During 2013–14, 317 adoptions were finalised across Australia. Among these adoptions: 64% were children from Australia and 36% were from overseas28% were by carers, such as foster parents32% of adoptees came from Asia45% of adoptees were aged under 5.

Youth detention population in Australia 2014

This report presents information on the youth detention population in Australia, focusing on quarterly trends from June 2010 to June 2014. On an average night, close to 1,000 young people were in detention, about half of whom were unsentenced. Nationally, numbers and rates of young people in detention remained relatively stable over the 4 years; but trends varied among states and territories. About half of all young people in detention on an average night were Indigenous.

Developing the National Early Childhood Development Researchable Data Set

This information paper outlines the processes undertaken towards establishing the National Early Childhood Development Researchable Data Set. This data set aims to link health and education data, using both jurisdictional and national data sources, which would provide a valuable resource to researchers and policy-makers. The paper documents the privacy, legislative and data custodianship and supply hurdles encountered during the initial stages of establishing this data set. The paper concludes with a pragmatic approach for the next steps and way forward.

National core maternity indicators—stage 2 report: 2007–2011

This report on stage 2 of the national core maternity indicators project describes the development of 8 indicators, including scoping and assessment of existing data items for reporting. Of the 8 indicators proposed, 3 will be added to the existing set of 10 national core maternity indicators, 2 existing and 1 additional indicator will undergo further development and 3 will not undergo further development at this time.

Hospitalised injury in children and young people 2011-12

The aim of this report is to provide information about serious hospitalised injury in Australian children and young people aged 0 to 24 years. The report takes a developmental stage approach to examining injury acknowledging that age and injury are more closely linked at some periods of life (for example, early childhood and young adulthood).

Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders: strategies to address information gaps

Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD) is emerging as a public health issue in Australia. Health-care providers and policy makers need accurate and timely data in a useable format to monitor and prevent FASD.This bulletin identifies ways to facilitate the collection and reporting of FASD-related information in Australia. The quality of information available in existing data collections is variable and incomplete for ascertaining cases of FASD. Regular surveillance and monitoring have been identified as priorities for determining incidence and prevalence.

A new approach to national child protection data: implementation of the Child Protection National Minimum Data Set

Over the past few years, the AIHW, with dedicated national resources made available through the Australian Government, has worked with all jurisdictions to implement a new Child Protection National Minimum Data Set (CP NMDS) for reporting on child protection. This working paper describes the development and implementation of the CP NMDS and highlights key new analyses able to be reported for the first time at the national level. It also outlines the need for ongoing development work.

Nomenclature for models of maternity care: a consultation report

The report presents the findings of consultation on a proposed system for classifying models of maternity care in Australia. It is one of several components of the National Maternity Data Development Project and is a companion report to the publication, Foundations for enhanced maternity data collection and reporting in Australia: National Maternity Data Development Project Stage 1.

Maternal mortality: data linkage methodology

The report presents a data linkage methodology to ascertain the number of maternal and late maternal deaths in Australia. It is one of several components of the National Maternity Data Development Project and is a companion report to the publication, Foundations for enhanced maternity data collection and reporting in Australia: National Maternity Data Development Project Stage 1.

National perinatal mortality data reporting project: issues paper

This paper presents findings on the issues that need to be considered in order to produce a national perinatal mortality report that is relevant to maternity services. It is one of several components of the National Maternity Data Development Project and is a companion report to the publication Foundations for enhanced maternity data collection and reporting in Australia: National Maternity Data Development Project Stage 1.

Youth justice orders and supervision periods: 2012-13

This fact sheet summarises information on the number of supervised orders administered by state and territory youth justice agencies, and the periods of supervision experienced by young people in 2012-13. To some extent, differences between states and territories in the numbers and types of legal orders can reflect differences in legislation and legal and administrative practices.

Time under youth justice supervision: 2012-13

This fact sheet is about how long young people spent under youth justice supervision in 2012–13.

Long-term trends in youth justice supervision: 2012-13

This fact sheet summarises the long-term trends in rates of young people under supervision. It includes 7-year national trends and up to 13-year trends for individual states and territories.

Types of community-based supervision: 2012-13

This fact sheet outlines the types of community-based supervision that young people experienced in 2012-13.Young people may be supervised in the community under one or more types of orders, including:unsentenced orders-such as supervised or conditional bail (while awaiting the outcome of a court matter or sentencing)sentenced orders-such as probation and similar orders, suspended detention, and parole or supervised release (after being proven guilty in a court).Young people may be supervised under multiple orders of different types at the same time, and community-based orders may be interrupted by time spent in detention.

Unsentenced detention: 2012-13

This fact sheet summarises information about young people in unsentenced detention during 2012-13.Young people may be in unsentenced detention when they have been charged with an offence and are awaiting the outcome of their court matter, or when they have been found or pleaded guilty and are awaiting sentencing. They may also be sentenced to a period of detention if proven guilty in a court.Young people may be referred to unsentenced detention by either police (pre-court) or a court (known as remand). Police-referred pre-court detention is not available in all states and territories, and most young people in unsentenced detention are on remand.

Sentenced detention: 2012-13

This fact sheet provides information about young people in sentenced detention in 2012-13.Young people may be sentenced to a period of detention if proven guilty in a court. This includes young people who have received orders, such as control orders, revocation of parole and youth residential orders. They may also be in detention when they are unsentenced—that is, when they have been charged with an offence and are awaiting the outcome of their court matter, or when they have been found or pleaded guilty and are awaiting sentencing.

Detention entries and exits: 2012-13

This fact sheet provides information about the numbers of young people under youth justice supervision who were either received into, and/or released from, detention in 2012-13. A reception is when a young person enters detention having not been detained immediately before. Conversely, a release is when a young person leaves detention and is not detained immediately after.

Remoteness area and socioeconomic status: 2012-13

This fact sheet provides information about the remoteness area and socioeconomic status of young people under supervision during 2012-13, based on their last known address.

First entry to supervision: 2012-13

This fact sheet provides information about the first entry to youth justice supervision among young people who were supervised during 2012-13.

Youth justice supervision history: 2012-13

This fact sheet explores the supervision history of the young people who were under youth justice supervision during 2012-13.

Comparisons between the youth and adult justice systems: 2012–13

This fact sheet summarises some of the key similarities and differences between young people and adults in the justice systems in Australia.In all states and territories, young people aged 10 and over can be charged with a criminal offence. Separate justice systems exist for young people and adults, each with specific legislation. In most cases, the upper age limit in the youth justice system is 17 at the time of the offence (16 in Queensland). Some young people aged 18 and over are under youth justice supervision; reasons for this include their age at the time of the offence, continuation of their supervision once they turn 18, and their vulnerability or immaturity.

Comparisons between Australian and international youth justice systems: 2012–13

This fact sheet examines Australian and international approaches to youth justice.

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