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Youth justice orders and supervision periods: 2013–14

This fact sheet summarises information on the number of supervised orders administered by state and territory youth justice agencies, and the periods of supervision experienced by young people in 2013–14. To some extent, differences between states and territories in the numbers and types of legal orders can reflect differences in legislation and legal and administrative practices.

Long-term trends in youth justice supervision: 2013–14

This fact sheet summarises the long-term trends in rates of young people under youth justice supervision. It includes 8-year national trends, and trends for individual states and territories for up to 10 years.

Types of community-based youth justice supervision: 2013–14

This fact sheet outlines the types of community-based supervision that young people experienced in Australia in 2013–14. Young people may be supervised under one or more of the following types of orders: unsentenced orders (while awaiting the outcome of a court matter or sentencing)—such as supervised or conditional bail; sentenced orders (after being proven guilty in court)—such as probation and similar orders, suspended detention and parole or supervised release. Young people may be supervised under multiple orders of different types at the same time, and parole or supervised release orders may be interrupted by time spent in detention.

Young people in unsentenced detention: 2013–14

 This fact sheet summarises information about young people in unsentenced detention in Australia in 2013–14.Young people may be in unsentenced detention when they have been charged with an offence and are awaiting the outcome of their court matter, or when they have been found or pleaded guilty and are awaiting sentencing. Young people may be referred to unsentenced detention by either police (pre-court) or a court (known as remand). Police-referred pre-court detention is not available in all states and territories, and most young people in unsentenced detention are on remand.

Young people in sentenced detention: 2013–14

This fact sheet provides summary information about young people in sentenced detention in 2013–14. Young people may be sentenced to a period of detention if they are proven guilty in a court. This includes young people who have received orders such as control orders, revocation of parole and youth residential orders.

Remoteness, socioeconomic status and youth justice supervision: 2013–14

This fact sheet provides information about the remoteness area and socioeconomic status of young people under supervision during 2013–14, based on their last known address.

First entry to youth justice supervision: 2013–14

This fact sheet provides information about the first entry to youth justice supervision among young people who were supervised during 2013–14.

Youth detention entries and exits: 2013–14

This fact sheet provides information about the numbers of young people under youth justice supervision who were received into, and/or released from, detention in 2013–14. A reception is when a young person enters detention having not been detained immediately before. Conversely, a release is when a young person leaves detention and is not detained immediately after.

Comparisons between Australian and international youth justice systems: 2013–14

This fact sheet examines Australian and international approaches to youth justice.

Comparisons between the youth and adult justice systems: 2013–14

This fact sheet summarises some of the similarities and differences between young people and adults in the justice systems in Australia.

Youth justice supervision history: 2013–14

This fact sheet summarises the supervision histories of young people who were under youth justice supervision during 2013–14.

Maternal deaths in Australia 2008–2012

Maternal deaths in Australia 2008–2012 is the 16th report on women who die in association with pregnancy and childbirth. Maternal death review is one of the oldest known forms of clinical care quality assurance. Maternal death in Australia is a rare event in the context of worldwide maternal deaths. In 2008–2012, there were 105 maternal deaths in Australia that occurred within 42 days of the end of pregnancy, representing a maternal mortality ratio (MMR) of 7.1 deaths per 100,000 women who gave birth. All such deaths should be seen as devastating for the woman’s family and community, and should be carefully examined for possible lessons learned that may prevent future similar events.

Development of a national education and training data standards strategy and implementation plan

The Australian Institute of Health and Welfare developed a national data standards strategy and implementation plan to enhance the comparability, quality and coherence of information across the Australian education and training sectors, including early childhood education, school education, vocational education and training (VET) and higher education. This project report summarises the activities and process undertaken over 12 months from October 2013 to develop the strategy and implementation plan.

Child protection Australia 2013–14

This report contains comprehensive information on state and territory child protection and support services in 2013-14, and the characteristics of Australian children within the child protection system. This report shows that: - around 143,000 children, a rate of 27.2 per 1,000 children, received child protection services (investigation, care and protection order and/or in out-of-home care); - three-quarters (73%) of these children had previously been the subject of an investigation, care and protection order and/or out-of-home care placement; - Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children were 7 times as likely as non-Indigenous children to be receiving child protection services.

Healthy Futures—Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services: report card

During 2012-13, Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHS) saw just over 250,000 Indigenous clients, who received about 2.1 million episodes of care.Over 210,000 Indigenous people were regular clients of ACCHS. This report shows increases in the proportion of clients receiving appropriate processes of care for ten of the 16 primary health care indicators.

Hearing health outreach services to Indigenous children and young people in the Northern Territory 2012–13 and 2013–14

This report presents analyses on hearing health outreach services provided to Indigenous children and young people in the Northern Territory, funded through the Australian Government in 2012–13 and 2013–14. It reports the number and proportion of children and young people who received outreach audiology, ENT teleotology, and Child Hearing Health Coordinator services, as well as information about the hearing status and middle ear conditions among service recipients. Of the 2,854 children and young people who received audiology services between July 2012 and June 2014, hearing loss was present in 51% at their latest service; however, among those who received 2 or more of these services, there were functional improvements in hearing over time.

Using the Juvenile Justice National Minimum Data Set to measure returns to sentenced youth justice supervision: stage 2

This is the second of 2 reports presenting measures of returns to sentenced youth justice supervision using data from the Juvenile Justice National Minimum Data Set (JJ NMDS). This report further examines timeframes for measuring returns and explores the potential for using JJ NMDS data to measure the seriousness of reoffending. A number of recommendations are made, including that timeframes of 6 months and 1 year be used; that an increase in sentence severity be used as an interim proxy indicator of escalating offending behaviour; and that future work include reporting on returns to sentenced supervision on an annual basis.

National outcome measures for early childhood development—phase 2: scoping paper

This report presents the results of Phase 2 of the National Outcome Measures for Early Childhood Development project. It identifies potential indicators for 5 indicator topic areas (child behavioural problems, peer relationships, racism, school engagement and parenting quality/capacity) and potential data sources for a further 2 (social and emotional wellbeing, and family social networks).

Australia's mothers and babies 2012

In 2012, 307,474 women gave birth to 312,153 babies in Australia. This was an increase of 10,343 births (3.4%) from that reported in 2011, and a total increase of 21.5% since 2003. Nationally, the proportion of teenage mothers (younger than 20) declined from 3.7% in 2011 to 3.6% in 2011, compared with 4.6% in 2003.

New Directions: Mothers and Babies Services—assessment of the program using nKPI data—December 2012 to December 2013

This report uses the maternal and child health measures in the national Key Performance Indicators on Indigenous primary health care to provide insights into the New Directions Mothers and Babies Services programme. The analyses found that there was an improvement in 7 out of 8 of these measures in organisations receiving New Directions funding.

Adoptions Australia 2013-14

Adoptions Australia 2013–14, the 24th report in the series, presents the latest data on adoptions of Australian children and children from overseas, and highlights important trends in the number of adoptions back to 1989–90. Data cover characteristics of adopted children, their parents and adoptive families, as well as applications and vetoes for contact and information exchange, and intercountry adoption processing times. During 2013–14, 317 adoptions were finalised across Australia. Among these adoptions: –64% were children from Australia and 36% were from overseas –28% were by carers, such as foster parents –32% of adoptees came from Asia –45% of adoptees were aged under 5.

Youth detention population in Australia 2014

This report presents information on the youth detention population in Australia, focusing on quarterly trends from June 2010 to June 2014. On an average night, close to 1,000 young people were in detention, about half of whom were unsentenced. Nationally, numbers and rates of young people in detention remained relatively stable over the 4 years; but trends varied among states and territories. About half of all young people in detention on an average night were Indigenous.

SCSEEC successful school attendance strategies evidence-based project: literature review

This report reviews the available evidence on effective strategies for improving attendance among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students.  Analysis of this literature yielded nine types of strategies or interventions with demonstrated evidence of effectiveness. The report discusses each of these strategies, presenting examples of successful programs and the mechanisms that appear to underpin their effectiveness.

SCSEEC successful school attendance strategies evidence-based project: final report

This report presents detailed findings from the SCSEEC Successful School Attendance Strategies Evidence-based Project. Bringing together information from a literature review and a series of consultations with schools, it presents key lessons for developing and implementing effective strategies for improving school attendance among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students.

SCSEEC successful school attendance strategies evidence-based project: summary report

This report presents detailed findings from the SCSEEC Successful School Attendance Strategies Evidence-based Project. Bringing together information from a literature review and a series of consultations with schools, it presents key lessons for developing and implementing effective strategies for improving school attendance among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students.

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