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Adoptions Australia 2015–16

Adoptions Australia 2015–16, the 26th report in the series, presents the latest data on adoptions of Australian children and children from overseas, and highlights important trends in the number of adoptions back to 1991–92. Data cover characteristics of adopted children, their parents and adoptive families, as well as applications and vetoes for contact and information exchange, and intercountry processing times. During 2015–16, there were 278 adoptions finalised across Australia, the lowest on record over the period reported: 100% of local adoptees were aged under 5, compared with 71% of intercountry adoptees and 9% of known child adoptees.

Vulnerable young people: interactions across homelessness, youth justice and child protection: 1 July 2011 to 30 June 2015

This report reveals that individuals who experience multiple, cross-sector services in the specialist homelessness, protection or youth justice service areas are a particularly vulnerable group. Clients experiencing 2 or more of these services were more likely than specialist homelessness services-only clients: to report having substance use issues; to report having mental health issues; to have an over-representation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people; and to receive more days of support and more support periods from specialist homelessness services agencies.

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) among children and young people with type 1 diabetes

This fact sheet provides the most recent available data on hospitalisations for diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA)—a serious complication of diabetes. It highlights that DKA continues to affect many children and young people with type 1 diabetes, in particular females and those living in regional and remote areas and in lower socioeconomic areas.

Australia's mothers and babies 2014—in brief

Australia’s mothers and babies 2014—in brief presents key statistics and trends on pregnancy and childbirth of mothers, and the characteristics and outcomes of their babies. This publication is designed to accompany the perinatal dynamic data display available online at www.aihw.gov.au/perinatal-data/.

Young people in child protection and under youth justice supervision 2014–15

This report presents information on young people aged 10–17 who were both in the child protection system and under youth justice supervision in 2014–15; it demonstrates the insights that can be gained through data linkage. Two (2) in 5 (40.8%) young people in youth justice detention in 2014–15 were also in the child protection system that year. Those who were younger at their first youth justice supervision were more likely to also be in child protection.

Permanency planning in child protection: a review of current concepts and available data 2016

Permanency planning and long-term care for children in out-of-home care can involve family reunification, third-party parental responsibility orders, long-term finalised guardianship/custody orders and adoptions by carers. This report describes concepts and available data in this area, and development work being undertaken to improve national reporting. Available data indicate: -There were 31,129 children on finalised guardianship/custody orders and 9,070 children on finalised third-party parental responsibility orders at 30 June 2015. - There were 94 adoptions by carers finalised in 2014–15. - Most (87%) children who had been continuously in care for 2 or more years had also spent at least 2 years in one main care arrangement.

Young people returning to sentenced youth justice supervision 2014–15

Most young people who have a supervised sentence serve only 1 sentence and do not return. For those born from 1990–91 to 1996–97, around 62% received only 1 sentence before the age of 18. The younger a person is at the time of first receiving a supervision sentence, the more likely they are to return.Of the young people aged 10–16 in 2013–14 and released from sentenced community-based supervision, around 23% returned to sentenced supervision in 6 months, and 46% returned within 12 months. Of those released from sentenced detention, 50% returned to sentenced supervision within 6 months and 74% returned within 12 months.

National Core Maternity Indicators stage 3 and 4 results from 2010–2013

National Core Maternity Indicators (NCMIs) are designed to assist in improving the quality of maternity services in Australia by establishing baseline data for monitoring and evaluating practice change. This report and the data portal covers the period from 2004 to 2013, and includes data for the vast majority of women who gave birth in Australia over that period. The 10 measures previously reported have been updated with 2010–2013 perinatal data, while 2 new measures are reported for the first time. Data are presented by jurisdiction, by Primary Health Network, and at the national level by hospital annual number of births, hospital sector, and mother’s Indigenous status. Some indicators are presented by remoteness

Poisoning in children and young people 2012–13

This report provides information about children and young people aged 0–24 who were hospitalised as a result of poisoning in Australia. Almost half (49%) of all cases occurred among 18–24 year olds and a quarter among 15–17 year olds (26%). The highest rate of poisoning by pharmaceuticals was seen in 15–17 year old girls (589 cases per 100,000). The majority (37%) of these cases were caused by non-opioid analgesics (for example, ibuprofen and paracetamol).

Peripartum hysterectomy in Australia: a working paper using the National Hospital Morbidity Database 2003–04 to 2013–14

Peripartum hysterectomy, a life-saving procedure to stop haemorrhage after giving birth, can have considerable consequences for mothers and their babies. This working paper analyses 11 years of national hospitalisation data to derive the estimated rate of peripartum hysterectomy in Australia in recent years and examine the rates of diagnoses for particular conditions contributing to peripartum hysterectomy. This is part of the National Maternity Data Development Project’s work to develop national data standards for maternal morbidity data items.

Youth justice in Australia 2014–15

There were about 5,600 young people (aged 10 and older) under youth justice supervision in Australia on an average day in 2014–15, due to their involvement, or alleged involvement, in crime. This number has decreased by 23% over the 5 years to 2014–15. Around 4 in 5 (82%) young people under supervision on an average day were male. Most (85%) young people were supervised in the community and the remainder were in detention. Although rates of supervision decreased over the 5-year period for both Indigenous and non-Indigenous young people, the level of Indigenous over-representation increased.

Western Australia: youth justice supervision in 2014–15

This fact sheet focuses on youth justice supervision in Western Australia in 2014–15, and includes some national comparisons.This is one of a series of fact sheets on youth justice supervision in 2014–15.

Victoria: youth justice supervision in 2014–15

This fact sheet focuses on youth justice supervision in Victoria in 2014–15 and includes some national comparisons.This is one of a series of fact sheets on youth justice supervision in 2014–15.

Tasmania: youth justice supervision in 2014–15

This fact sheet focuses on youth justice supervision in Tasmania in 2014–15, and includes some national comparisons.This is one of a series of fact sheets on youth justice supervision in 2014–15.

South Australia: youth justice supervision in 2014–15

This fact sheet focuses on youth justice supervision in South Australia in 2014–15, and includes some national comparisons.This is one of a series of fact sheets on youth justice supervision in 2014–15.

Queensland: youth justice supervision in 2014–15

This fact sheet focuses on youth justice supervision in Queensland in 2014–15, and includes some national comparisons.This is one of a series of fact sheets on youth justice supervision in 2014–15.

Australian Capital Territory: youth justice supervision in 2014–15

This fact sheet focuses on youth justice supervision in the Australian Capital Territory in 2014–15, and includes some national comparisons.This is one of a series of fact sheets on youth justice supervision in 2014–15.

New South Wales: youth justice supervision in 2014–15

This fact sheet focuses on youth justice supervision in New South Wales in 2014–15, and includes some national comparisons.This is one of a series of fact sheets on youth justice supervision in 2014–15.

Northern Territory: youth justice supervision in 2014–15

This fact sheet focuses on youth justice supervision in Northern Territory in 2014–15, and includes some national comparisons.This is one of a series of fact sheets on youth justice supervision in 2014–15.

Child protection Australia 2014–15

This report contains comprehensive information on state and territory child protection and support services in 2014-15, and on the characteristics of Australian children within the child protection system. This report shows that: 151,980 children, a rate of 28.6 per 1,000 children, received child protection services (investigation, care and protection order and/or were in out-of-home care)three-quarters (73%) of these children had previously been the subject of an investigation, care and protection order and/or were in out-of-home careAboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children were 7 times as likely as non-Indigenous children to be receiving child protection services.

The views of children and young people in out-of-home care: overview of indicator results from a pilot national survey 2015

This bulletin presents an overview of results from a 2015 national pilot data collection on the views of children in out-of-home care. Key findings include 91% of children reporting feeling both safe and settled in their current placement; 97% reporting that they had an adult who cares about what happens to them now and in the future; and 67% reporting that they usually get to have a say in what happens to them, and that people usually listen to what they say.

Hospitalised injuries in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and young people: 2011–13

This report provides information about hospitalised injuries among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and young people (0 to 24 years). The most common specific cause of injury among Indigenous children and young people was a fall (24%). Assault was the leading cause of hospitalisation for Indigenous people aged 15–17 and 18–24 years.

Young people in child protection and under youth justice supervision 2013–14

This report presents information on young people aged 10–17 who were involved in the child protection system and under youth justice supervision in 2013–14, and demonstrates the insights that can be gained through data linkage. Nearly half (45%) of young people in youth justice detention were also in the child protection system in the same year. Those who were younger at their first youth justice supervision were more likely to also be in child protection.

Adoptions Australia 2014–15

Adoptions Australia 2014–15, the 25th report in the series, presents the latest data on adoptions of Australian children and children from overseas, and highlights important trends in the number of adoptions back to 1990–91. During 2014–15, 292 adoptions were finalised across Australia—72% were children from Australia and 28% were from overseas, with 27% of all adoptees coming from Asia. Adoption of Australian children by carers, such as foster parents, comprised 32% of all adoptions.

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