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A new approach to national child protection data: implementation of the Child Protection National Minimum Data Set

Over the past few years, the AIHW, with dedicated national resources made available through the Australian Government, has worked with all jurisdictions to implement a new Child Protection National Minimum Data Set (CP NMDS) for reporting on child protection. This working paper describes the development and implementation of the CP NMDS and highlights key new analyses able to be reported for the first time at the national level. It also outlines the need for ongoing development work.

Nomenclature for models of maternity care: a consultation report

The report presents the findings of consultation on a proposed system for classifying models of maternity care in Australia. It is one of several components of the National Maternity Data Development Project and is a companion report to the publication, Foundations for enhanced maternity data collection and reporting in Australia: National Maternity Data Development Project Stage 1.

Maternal mortality: data linkage methodology

The report presents a data linkage methodology to ascertain the number of maternal and late maternal deaths in Australia. It is one of several components of the National Maternity Data Development Project and is a companion report to the publication, Foundations for enhanced maternity data collection and reporting in Australia: National Maternity Data Development Project Stage 1.

National perinatal mortality data reporting project: issues paper

This paper presents findings on the issues that need to be considered in order to produce a national perinatal mortality report that is relevant to maternity services. It is one of several components of the National Maternity Data Development Project and is a companion report to the publication Foundations for enhanced maternity data collection and reporting in Australia: National Maternity Data Development Project Stage 1.

Youth justice orders and supervision periods: 2012-13

This fact sheet summarises information on the number of supervised orders administered by state and territory youth justice agencies, and the periods of supervision experienced by young people in 2012-13. To some extent, differences between states and territories in the numbers and types of legal orders can reflect differences in legislation and legal and administrative practices.

Time under youth justice supervision: 2012-13

This fact sheet is about how long young people spent under youth justice supervision in 2012–13.

Long-term trends in youth justice supervision: 2012-13

This fact sheet summarises the long-term trends in rates of young people under supervision. It includes 7-year national trends and up to 13-year trends for individual states and territories.

Types of community-based supervision: 2012-13

This fact sheet outlines the types of community-based supervision that young people experienced in 2012-13.Young people may be supervised in the community under one or more types of orders, including:unsentenced orders-such as supervised or conditional bail (while awaiting the outcome of a court matter or sentencing)sentenced orders-such as probation and similar orders, suspended detention, and parole or supervised release (after being proven guilty in a court).Young people may be supervised under multiple orders of different types at the same time, and community-based orders may be interrupted by time spent in detention.

Unsentenced detention: 2012-13

This fact sheet summarises information about young people in unsentenced detention during 2012-13.Young people may be in unsentenced detention when they have been charged with an offence and are awaiting the outcome of their court matter, or when they have been found or pleaded guilty and are awaiting sentencing. They may also be sentenced to a period of detention if proven guilty in a court.Young people may be referred to unsentenced detention by either police (pre-court) or a court (known as remand). Police-referred pre-court detention is not available in all states and territories, and most young people in unsentenced detention are on remand.

Sentenced detention: 2012-13

This fact sheet provides information about young people in sentenced detention in 2012-13.Young people may be sentenced to a period of detention if proven guilty in a court. This includes young people who have received orders, such as control orders, revocation of parole and youth residential orders. They may also be in detention when they are unsentenced—that is, when they have been charged with an offence and are awaiting the outcome of their court matter, or when they have been found or pleaded guilty and are awaiting sentencing.

Detention entries and exits: 2012-13

This fact sheet provides information about the numbers of young people under youth justice supervision who were either received into, and/or released from, detention in 2012-13. A reception is when a young person enters detention having not been detained immediately before. Conversely, a release is when a young person leaves detention and is not detained immediately after.

Remoteness area and socioeconomic status: 2012-13

This fact sheet provides information about the remoteness area and socioeconomic status of young people under supervision during 2012-13, based on their last known address.

First entry to supervision: 2012-13

This fact sheet provides information about the first entry to youth justice supervision among young people who were supervised during 2012-13.

Youth justice supervision history: 2012-13

This fact sheet explores the supervision history of the young people who were under youth justice supervision during 2012-13.

Comparisons between the youth and adult justice systems: 2012–13

This fact sheet summarises some of the key similarities and differences between young people and adults in the justice systems in Australia.In all states and territories, young people aged 10 and over can be charged with a criminal offence. Separate justice systems exist for young people and adults, each with specific legislation. In most cases, the upper age limit in the youth justice system is 17 at the time of the offence (16 in Queensland). Some young people aged 18 and over are under youth justice supervision; reasons for this include their age at the time of the offence, continuation of their supervision once they turn 18, and their vulnerability or immaturity.

Comparisons between Australian and international youth justice systems: 2012–13

This fact sheet examines Australian and international approaches to youth justice.

Maternal deaths in Australia 2006-2010

Maternal deaths in Australia 2006–10 is the 15th report on women who die during pregnancy and childbirth. Although maternal deaths are rare in Australia, they are catastrophic events when they do occur and require monitoring and investigation. The report includes information about the women, pregnancy, and cause of death as well as good practice guidance points for clinicians to inform practice improvement.

Birthweight of babies born to Indigenous mothers

Birthweight of babies born to Indigenous mothers provides an overview of the birthweight of babies born to Indigenous mothers, including recent trends and information on factors associated with birthweight variation. According to data from the National Perinatal Data Collection, 3.9% of all births in 2011 were to Indigenous mothers. Excluding multiple births, 11.2% of liveborn singleton babies born to Indigenous mothers were of low birthweight—2.5 times the rate for non-Indigenous mothers (4.6%). Between 2000 and 2011, there was a statistically significant decline in the low birthweight rate among Indigenous mothers, and the gap in birthweight between babies born to Indigenous and non-Indigenous mothers declined significantly over this period.

Pathways through youth justice supervision

Pathways through youth justice supervision explores the types of youth justice supervision experienced by particular cohorts of young people based on data available from the Juvenile Justice National Minimum Data Set (JJ NMDS) from 2000–01 to 2012–13. The report found that the top 10 pathways accounted for nearly three quarters (71%) of young people who experienced supervision. It also found that young males, young Indigenous people, those aged 10–14 at first supervision and those experiencing sentenced detention at some point were more likely than their counterparts to have more complex and varied pathways through supervision.

Child protection Australia 2012-13

Child protection Australia 2012–13 represents a significant milestone in national child protection reporting as it is the first time that unit record level data have been available for analysis and reporting. This report shows that:- there were 135,000 children, a rate of 26.1 per 1,000 children, receiving child protection services (investigation; care and protection order; and/or placed in out-of-home care).- more than half (56%) of these children were subject only to an investigation (that is, they were not subsequently placed on an order or in out-of-home care) while 8% were involved in all three components of the system.- in 2012–13, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children were 8 times as likely as non-Indigenous children to be receiving child protection services.

Indigenous child safety

Indigenous children are over represented in areas where child safety and security are compromised. This report shows that Indigenous children aged 0–17 have higher rates of hospitalisations and deaths due to injury than non Indigenous children; are more likely to be victims of child abuse, neglect and sexual assault; and are over represented in homelessness and youth justice statistics.

Child social exclusion and health outcomes: a study of small areas across Australia

This bulletin examines the association between the risk of child social exclusion and children’s health outcomes in Australia at the small-area level. The results show that Australian children living in areas with a relatively high risk of social exclusion also experience relatively poor health outcomes. As the risk of child social exclusion increases, so do the rates of both potentially preventable hospitalisations and avoidable deaths.

Youth justice in Australia 2012-13

Around 6,300 young people were under youth justice supervision in Australia on an average day in 2012-13, due to their involvement, or alleged involvement, in crime. Of these, over 4 in 5 (5,300 young people) were supervised in the community and the remaining 1,000 were in detention. Young people spent, on average, 26 weeks under supervision during the year.

Australian Capital Territory: youth justice supervision in 2012–13

This fact sheet focuses on youth justice supervision in the Australian Capital Territory during 2012-13 and provides some comparisons to the national context. This is one of a series of fact sheets on youth justice supervision in 2012-13.

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