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SAAP National data collection reports

Each year the AIHW produces reports on the Supported Accommodation Assistance Program (SAAP).

The SAAP National Data Collection annual reports provide information on people who received support from SAAP agencies. These reports include information on:

  • The number of clients supported by the program each year
  • The demographic characteristics of SAAP clients
  • The type of support required by SAAP clients and the extent to which support was provided
  • The circumstances of SAAP clients before and after support.

Also produced each year is the Demand for SAAP accommodation by homeless people report. This report looks at the demand for SAAP accommodation and the ability of agencies to meet this demand. Since 2003 the AIHW has produced both a report and a bulletin: 

  • The report contains detailed information and is only available online
  • The bulletin is shorter, containing selected data from the report, and is also available in hard copy.

The Counting the Homeless 2006 state and territory reports present breakdowns of the number of people experiencing homelessness on census night 2006. National estimates were published by the ABS in the
Counting the Homeless 2006 national report. The reports include information on:

  • Definitions and methods of adjustment used
  • Characteristics of those experiencing homelessness
  • Analysis at finer geographical levels.

The SAAP National Data Collection Agency also produces thematic reports focusing on select client groups that use SAAP services. Recent reports have focused on:

  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander clients and children
  • Clients with mental health and substance use problems
  • Children in SAAP
  • Female clients and children escaping domestic violence
  • SAAP clients with disabilities.

Homelessness publications list

Housing outcomes for groups vulnerable to homelessness: 1 July 2011 to 31 December 2013

Using data from specialist homelessness agencies, this bulletin examines four cohorts vulnerable to homelessness and the differences in the housing outcomes both across and within the groups. It seeks to better understand why some people in these groups may retain or attain housing while others become or stay homeless. It is expected that well known factors which make people more vulnerable to homelessness will also be key factors in their housing outcomes following support. This bulletin seeks to confirm that this is the case and also provide an indication of the extent of the impact of these factors.

Housing circumstances of Indigenous households: tenure and overcrowding

The housing circumstances of Indigenous Australians are described in this paper using Census data. The topics of housing tenure and overcrowding are covered, with trends considered, as well as differences according to factors such as remoteness, jurisdiction and socioeconomic status. In 2011, Indigenous households were about half as likely as other Australian households to own their home and more than 3 times as likely to be overcrowded.

Homelessness among Indigenous Australians

Homelessness among Indigenous Australians presents information on the prevalence of homelessness among Indigenous Australians, the characteristics of Indigenous people who are homeless, and the use of specialist homelessness services by Indigenous people who are homeless or at risk of homelessness. On Census night in 2011, there were an estimated 26,743 Indigenous people experiencing homelessness, comprising 28% of the total homeless population. Three-quarters of homeless Indigenous people were living in severely crowded dwellings. In 2012–13, about 1 in 5 clients of specialist homelessness services were Indigenous—an estimated 54,885 clients.

Specialist homelessness services 2012-13

In 2012-13 specialist homelessness services assisted over 244,000 clients. Of these clients, 54% were at risk of homelessness, and 46% were already homeless when they first began receiving support (22% of those who were homeless had no shelter or were living in an improvised dwelling). This report presents the findings of the Specialist Homelessness Services Collection for 2012-13, and describes the clients who received specialist homelessness support, the assistance they sought and were provided, and the outcomes achieved for those clients.

Housing assistance in Australia 2013

This report looks at trends in housing and housing assistance provided by governments in Australia in terms social housing and financial assistance in 2012-13. The report explores the various types of housing assistance provided to low-income households and special needs groups including first home buyers, Indigenous Australians, young and older Australians, people with disability, and those who are homeless. A high proportion of low income households spend more than 30% of their income on rent (42%). This creates a large demand for financial assistance (1.2 million receiving Commonwealth Rent Assistance) and social housing dwellings (over 200,000 on waiting lists). 

Specialist homelessness services: July-December 2012

Specialist homelessness agencies helped more than 157,000 clients  and provided more than 3.6 million nights of accommodation in the 6 months from July to December 2012. Almost half of clients were already homeless at the beginning of their first support period and the rest were at risk of homelessness. The most common main reasons given for seeking assistance were related to domestic or family violence and financial difficulties.

Specialist Homelessness Services 2011-12

In 2011-12, specialist homelessness services assisted almost 230,000 clients, representing 1 in 98 Australians. Of these clients, 56% were at risk of homelessness, 44% were already homeless and 11% were sleeping without shelter or in improvised or inadequate shelter when they first began receiving support. Agencies provided more than 7,000,000 nights of accommodation in 2011-12 and assisted 84% of clients at risk of homelessness to sustain their tenancy. This report presents the findings of the Specialist Homelessness Services Collection for 2011-12, and describes the clients of specialist homelessness agencies, the assistance they sought and were provided, and outcomes achieved for clients.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander identification in community services data collections: an updated data quality report

This report examines the identification of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander clients in a number of Australian Institute of Health and Welfare community services data collections, by analysing where Indigenous status is missing/not stated. It makes a number of recommendations, including that data collection manuals and training materials reflect the National best practice guidelines for collecting Indigenous status in health data sets. Where necessary, jurisdictions should consider modifying client forms and client information management systems to ensure consistency with these guidelines.

Specialist Homelessness Services Collection: March quarter 2012

This report presents results of the Specialist Homelessness Services Collection for the March quarter 2012. Nationally, 102,356 clients who were homeless or at risk of homelessness accessed specialist homelessness services in this quarter. On average, 18,600 clients were accommodated by these services on any given night during the quarter.

Specialist Homelessness Services Collection: December quarter 2011

This report presents results of the Specialist Homelessness Services Collection for the December quarter 2011. Homelessness (and the risk of homelessness) affects a large number of Australians each year. Nationally, it is estimated that 44 people per 10,000 accessed specialist homelessness services in this quarter and, on average, over 18,500 clients were accommodated by these service on any given night in the quarter.

Specialist Homelessness Services Collection: first results, September quarter 2011

Each year many Australians experience homelessness or find themselves in circumstances of risk of becoming homeless. This report presents the first quarterly results of the new Specialist Homelessness Services Collection. This collection replaces the Supported Accommodation Assistance Program National Data Collection which collected data on homelessness service provision by Australian governments since 1996.

People turned away from government funded specialist homelessness accommodation 2010-11

This report presents data on the people turned away from government-funded specialist homelessness accommodation in 2010-11. It is the final report to be sourced from the Supported Accommodation Assistance Program (SAAP) National Data Collection (NDC). From 1 July 2011, data will be reported from the new Specialist Homelessness Services (SHS) collection. The data collected indicate that government-funded specialist homelessness agencies are operating to capacity and are unable to completely meet the demand for accommodation. Some groups, such as families, experience more difficulty than others in obtaining accommodation.

People turned away from government funded specialist homelessness accommodation 2010-11: appendix

Appendix to the report 'People turned away from government-funded specialist homelessness accommodation 2010-11'.

Government-funded specialist homelessness services: SAAP National Data Collection annual report 2010-11: New South Wales

This report is one of the eight state and territory supplementary reports that accompany the national report on the use of government-funded specialist homelessness services in 2010-11. These supplements include data specific to each state and territory and a summary of key results.

Government-funded specialist homelessness services: SAAP National Data Collection annual report 2010-11: Western Australia

This report is one of the eight state and territory supplementary reports that accompany the national report on the use of government-funded specialist homelessness services in 2010-11. These supplements include data specific to each state and territory and a summary of key results.

Government-funded specialist homelessness services: SAAP National Data Collection annual report 2010-11: Northern Territory

This report is one of the eight state and territory supplementary reports that accompany the national report on the use of government-funded specialist homelessness services in 2010-11. These supplements include data specific to each state and territory and a summary of key results.

Government-funded specialist homelessness services: SAAP National Data Collection annual report 2010-11: Australia

This report presents the 2010-11 data on the use of government-funded specialist homelessness services. It is the final annual report to be sourced from the Supported Accommodation Assistance Program (SAAP) National Data Collection (NDC). From 1 July 2011, data on the people using specialist homelessness services will be reported from the new Specialist Homelessness Services (SHS) collection. In 2010-11, an estimated 230,500 people (equivalent to 1 in 97 Australians) used specialist homelessness services. Young people, families and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people continued to be significant users of services. The most common reasons why people sought support were interpersonal relationship issues (such as domestic or family violence); accommodation-related issues (such as being evicted); and financial issues (such as having insufficient money to pay for accommodation, food, bills or other essentials.

Government-funded specialist homelessness services: SAAP National Data Collection annual report 2010-11: Victoria

This report is one of the eight state and territory supplementary reports that accompany the national report on the use of government-funded specialist homelessness services in 2010-11. These supplements include data specific to each state and territory and a summary of key results.

Government-funded specialist homelessness services: SAAP National Data Collection annual report 2010-11: Queensland

This report is one of the eight state and territory supplementary reports that accompany the national report on the use of government-funded specialist homelessness services in 2010-11. These supplements include data specific to each state and territory and a summary of key results.

Government-funded specialist homelessness services: SAAP National Data Collection annual report 2010-11: South Australia

This report is one of the eight state and territory supplementary reports that accompany the national report on the use of government-funded specialist homelessness services in 2010-11. These supplements include data specific to each state and territory and a summary of key results.

People turned away from government-funded specialist homelessness accommodation 2009-10: appendix

Appendix to the report People turned away from government-funded specialist homelessness accommodation 2009-10.

People turned away from government-funded specialist homelessness accommodation 2009-10

This report presents data on the people turned away from government-funded specialist homelessness accommodation in 2009-10. The data indicate that government-funded specialist homelessness agencies are operating to capacity and are unable to completely meet the demand for their accommodation. Some groups, such as families, experience more difficulty than others in obtaining accommodation. When new requests for accommodation are considered on any given day, 58% of all people who sought immediate accommodation were turned away. New requests, however, comprise only 4% of the total demand for accommodation. When new requests plus all people currently in accommodation are considered, 2% of all people who sought immediate accommodation were newly accommodated on any given day and 2% were turned away. The rate of turn-away was similar to that reported in recent years.

Government-funded specialist homelessness services: SAAP National Data Collection annual report 2009-10: Australia

In 2009-10, 219,900 people (or 1 in every 100 Australians) used government-funded specialist homelessness services. Of these, 135,700 (62%) were clients and 84,100 (38%) were children accompanying clients. In 2009-10, young people, particularly young women, children, and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, were significant users of specialist homelessness services. Clients were supported for an average of 64 days and, when accommodated, were accommodated for an average of 60 days. Family groups generally had longer periods of support and accommodation than people who presented on their own.

Government-funded specialist homelessness services: SAAP National Data Collection annual report 2009-10: Australia appendix

Appendix to Government-funded specialist homelessness services: SAAP National Data Collection annual report 2009-10: Australia.

Government-funded specialist homelessness services: SAAP National Data Collection annual report 2009-10: New South Wales

This report is one of the eight state and territory supplementary reports that accompany the national report on the use of government-funded specialist homelessness services in 2009-10 (Government-funded specialist homelessness services: SAAP National Data Collection annual report 2009-10: Australia). These supplements include data specific to each state and territory and a summary of key results.

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