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Indigenous eye health measures 2016

This is the first national report on 22 newly developed Indigenous eye health measures. The measures cover the prevalence of eye health conditions, diagnosis and treatment services for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians, the eye health workforce and outreach services. Subject to data availability, the report examines differences between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians, as well as differences by factors such as age, sex, remoteness, jurisdiction and Primary Health Network.

Northern Territory Remote Aboriginal Investment: Oral Health Program—July 2012 to December 2015

This report presents analyses on oral health services provided to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and adolescents in the Northern Territory under the National Partnership Agreement on Northern Territory Remote Aboriginal Investment. From July 2012 to December 2015, there was generally an increase in the number of Indigenous children and adolescents who received full-mouth fluoride varnish applications, fissure sealant applications, and clinical services. A long-term analysis shows that the proportion of service recipients with experience of tooth decay decreased for most age groups between 2009 and 2015, with the greatest decrease—from 73% to 42%—seen in those aged 1–3.

Northern Territory Remote Aboriginal Investment: Ear and Hearing Health Program—July 2012 to June 2016

This report presents data on the Indigenous children and young people who participated in the audiology, ear, nose and throat (ENT) teleotology and Clinical Nurse Specialist (CNS) services delivered under the National Partnership Agreement on Northern Territory Remote Aboriginal Investment. During 2012–16, 9,221 outreach audiology services were provided to 5,357 children and young people, and 3,799 ENT teleotology services to 2,434 children and young people. A total of 2,612 children participated in the CNS services and presented for 3,085 visits. Of the children and young people who received audiology services in 2015–16, 31% had a hearing impairment.

National frameworks about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

This report provides an overview of 10 national frameworks, both current and historical, that describe Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and/or services provided to them. Each framework is described according to a set of 8 topics: the reason for its development; its purpose; underpinning elements; reporting protocols; consultation processes; review processes; structure; and inclusion of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander principles. The project was undertaken to inform the development of health frameworks by providing a summary of the topics and issues considered by existing frameworks and the processes involved in creating them.

Healthy Futures—Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services Report Card 2016

This report card provides information from about 140 Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHS) providing care to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians. During 2014–15 these services saw about 275,000 Indigenous clients who received almost 2.5 million episodes of care.About 228,700 Indigenous Australians were regular clients of ACCHSs, where they received maternal and child health services, chronic disease risk factor prevention, and management services. This report card shows rises in the proportion of clients receiving appropriate processes of care for 10 of the 16 relevant indicators.

Spatial distribution of the supply of the clinical health workforce 2014: relationship to the distribution of the Indigenous population

This report uses a new measure developed by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare—the Geographically-adjusted Index of Relative Supply (GIRS)—to examine the geographic supply of the clinical health workforce in seven key professions with particular relevance to Indigenous Australians. These professions were general practitioners, nurses, midwives, pharmacists, dentists, psychologists and optometrists. Areas with lower GIRS scores are more likely to face workforce supply challenges than those with higher GIRS scores. The GIRS scores were compared with the distribution of the Indigenous population to assess the extent to which Indigenous people live in areas with lower relative levels of workforce supply.

Better Cardiac Care measures for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people: second national report 2016

This is the second national report on the 21 Better Cardiac Care measures for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, with updated data available to report on 11 measures. For some of the measures, a better or similar rate for Indigenous Australians compared with non-Indigenous Australians was apparent, while on other measures, higher rates of ill health and death from cardiac conditions and lower rates of in-hospital treatment services among Indigenous Australians were evident. A number of measures suggested improvements for Indigenous Australians over time; examples include a decline in the death rate due to cardiac conditions and an increase in the proportion who received an MBS health assessment.

Incidence of end-stage kidney disease in Australia 1997–2013

The incidence of end-stage kidney disease is an important indicator of the health of the Australian population and valuable for health-care planning. End-stage kidney disease usually requires kidney replacement therapy to survive—either dialysis or a kidney transplant—but not all people with ESKD receive these treatments for a variety of reasons.This report builds on an established method for estimating the incidence of end-stage kidney disease and indicates that for every new case treated with dialysis or transplant there is one that is not. The incidence rates of end-stage kidney disease are highest among those aged 75 and over.

Australian Burden of Disease Study 2011: methods and supplementary material

This document provides a detailed description of the methods used to derive the fatal and non-fatal burden of disease (using the disability-adjusted life years, years lived with disability and years of life lost measures) for the Australian and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander populations for 2011 and 2003, as well as estimates of how much of the burden can be attributed to various risk factors . The report is targeted at researchers and epidemiologists, and those seeking to further understand results provided in the Australian Burden of Disease Study 2011.

Australian Burden of Disease Study: impact and causes of illness and death in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people 2011

This report provides estimates of the non-fatal and fatal burden of disease for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population as well as estimates of the gap in disease burden between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians. The disease groups causing the most burden among Indigenous Australians in 2011 were mental and substance use disorders, injuries, cardiovascular diseases, cancer and respiratory diseases. Indigenous Australians experienced a burden of disease that was 2.3 times the rate of non-Indigenous Australians. Over one third of the overall disease burden experienced by Indigenous Australians could be prevented by removing exposure to risk factors such as tobacco and alcohol use, high body mass, physical inactivity and high blood pressure.

Australian Burden of Disease Study: impact and causes of illness and death in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people 2011—summary report

This summary report presents key findings from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare’s report Australian Burden of Disease Study: Impact and causes of illness and death in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people 2011. It provides estimates of the burden due to different diseases and injuries for Indigenous Australians, estimates of the gap in burden between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians and the contribution of various risk factors to this burden.

Exploring drug treatment and homelessness in Australia: 1 July 2011 to 30 June 2014

There is much research to suggest a considerable overlap between people experiencing precarious housing, and drug and alcohol misuse. Linking client data from specialist homelessness services and alcohol and other drug treatment services, this report provides a picture of the intersection of these two issues on a national scale. It reveals a vulnerable population, in which Indigenous Australians and experiences of domestic and family violence and mental health issues were all over-represented. Their poorer drug treatment and housing outcomes highlight the level of difficulty faced in assisting these people to achieve long-term outcomes.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health organisations: Online Services Report—key results 2014–15

This is the seventh national report on organisations funded by the Australian Government to provide health services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. In 2014–15: - 203 organisations provided primary health-care services to around 434,600 clients through 5.0 million client contacts and 3.5 million episodes of care; - 221 counsellors provided social and emotional wellbeing services to around 21,100 clients through 100,200 client contacts; - 67 organisations provided substance-use rehabilitation and treatment services to around 25,200 clients through 151,000 episodes of care.

Hospitalised injuries in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and young people: 2011–13

This report provides information about hospitalised injuries among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and young people (0 to 24 years). The most common specific cause of injury among Indigenous children and young people was a fall (24%). Assault was the leading cause of hospitalisation for Indigenous people aged 15–17 and 18–24 years.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health performance framework 2014 report: detailed analyses

This report gives the latest information on how Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Australia are faring according to a range of measures of health status and outcomes, determinants of health and health system performance. Indicators are based on the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework. The report highlights the main areas of improvement and continuing concern.

Cardiovascular disease, diabetes and chronic kidney disease—Australian facts: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

Cardiovascular disease, diabetes and chronic kidney disease—Australian facts is a series of 5 reports by the National Centre for Monitoring Vascular Diseases at the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare that describe the combined burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD), diabetes and chronic kidney disease (CKD).This report on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people presents up-to-date statistics on risk factors, prevalence, hospitalisation and deaths from these 3 chronic diseases. It examines age and sex characteristics and variations by geographical location and compares these with the non-Indigenous population.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework 2014 report: South Australia

This report gives the latest information on how Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in South Australia are faring according to a range of measures of health status and outcomes, determinants of health and health system performance. Indicators are based on the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework. The report highlights the main areas of improvement and continuing concern.

Hearing health outreach services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and young people in the Northern Territory: 2012–13 to 2014–15

This is the third annual report on hearing health outreach services provided to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and young people in the Northern Territory, funded by the Australian Government. It reports on outreach audiology, ENT teleotology, and Child Hearing Health Coordinator services provided from July 2012 to June 2015. There is evidence to suggest the effectiveness of these programs in improving ear and hearing health among service recipients—of almost 1,000 children and young people who received multiple outreach audiology services in 2012–15 and who had hearing loss at their first service, one-third had no hearing loss at their most recent service.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework 2014 report: Western Australia

This report gives the latest information on how Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Western Australia are faring according to a range of measures of health status and outcomes, determinants of health and health system performance. Indicators are based on the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework. The report highlights the main areas of improvement and continuing concern.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework 2014 report: Queensland

This report gives the latest information on how Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Queensland are faring according to a range of measures of health status and outcomes, determinants of health and health system performance. Indicators are based on the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework. The report highlights the main areas of improvement and continuing concern.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework 2014 report: Northern Territory

This report gives the latest information on how Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the Northern Territory are faring according to a range of measures of health status and outcomes, determinants of health and health system performance. Indicators are based on the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework. The report highlights the main areas of improvement and continuing concern.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework 2014 report: New South Wales

This report gives the latest information on how Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in New South Wales are faring according to a range of measures of health status and outcomes, determinants of health and health system performance. Indicators are based on the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework. The report highlights the main areas of improvement and continuing concern.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework 2014 report: Victoria

This report gives the latest information on how Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Victoria are faring according to a range of measures of health status and outcomes, determinants of health and health system performance. Indicators are based on the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performanc

National key performance indicators for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander primary health care: results from December 2014

This is the third national report on the national Key Performance Indicators (nKPIs) data collection. It captures data from more than 230 primary health care organisations that receive funding from the Australian Government Department of Health to provide services primarily to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. It presents data for 21 ‘process-of-care’ and ‘health outcome’ indicators, which focus on maternal and child health, preventative health and chronic disease management. The report shows improvements against almost all of the indicators.

Implementation Plan goals for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan 2013–2023: technical companion document

This document is a technical companion for the Implementation Plan for the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan 2013–2023. It provides information about the Implementation Plan goals, including how they were selected and technical details, such as data sources and baseline measures.

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