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Enhancing maternity data collection and reporting in Australia: National Maternity Data Development Project Stage 2

This report presents findings of Stage 2 of the National Maternity Data Development Project, which was established in response to the National Maternity Services Plan. The aim of the Project is to build a more comprehensive and consistent national data collection for maternal and perinatal health. Stage 2 has seen substantial progress in: data development for clinical data items and maternity models of care; maternal and perinatal mortality reporting; and online dissemination of perinatal data.

Maternity Care Classification System: Maternity Model of Care Data Set Specification national pilot report November 2014

The Maternity Care Classification System, or MaCCS, was developed as part of the National Maternity Data Development Project to provide a comprehensive classification system for maternity models of care operating in Australia. This report describes a pilot test that was conducted as part of the data development work on an important element of the MaCCS: the Maternity Model of Care Data Set Specification. Included in the report is a background description of the work, methodology, logistics and the results of the pilot.

Australia's mothers and babies 2013—in brief

Australia’s mothers and babies 2013—in brief presents key statistics and trends on pregnancy and childbirth of mothers, and the characteristics and outcomes of their babies. This publication is designed to accompany the Perinatal data portal available online atwww.aihw.gov.au/perinatal-data/.

Screening for domestic violence during pregnancy: options for future reporting in the National Perinatal Data Collection

This report discusses barriers to, and opportunities for the collection of data on screening for domestic violence during pregnancy. It proposes options for data collection through the National Perinatal Data Collection, which includes data about every woman who gives birth in Australia. The work is part of the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare’s National Maternity Data Development Project.

Maternal deaths in Australia 2008–2012

Maternal deaths in Australia 2008–2012 is the 16th report on women who die in association with pregnancy and childbirth. Maternal death review is one of the oldest known forms of clinical care quality assurance. Maternal death in Australia is a rare event in the context of worldwide maternal deaths. In 2008–2012, there were 105 maternal deaths in Australia that occurred within 42 days of the end of pregnancy, representing a maternal mortality ratio (MMR) of 7.1 deaths per 100,000 women who gave birth. All such deaths should be seen as devastating for the woman’s family and community, and should be carefully examined for possible lessons learned that may prevent future similar events.

Australia's mothers and babies 2012

In 2012, 307,474 women gave birth to 312,153 babies in Australia. This was an increase of 10,343 births (3.4%) from that reported in 2011, and a total increase of 21.5% since 2003. Nationally, the proportion of teenage mothers (younger than 20) declined from 3.7% in 2011 to 3.6% in 2011, compared with 4.6% in 2003.

National core maternity indicators—stage 2 report: 2007–2011

This report on stage 2 of the national core maternity indicators project describes the development of 8 indicators, including scoping and assessment of existing data items for reporting. Of the 8 indicators proposed, 3 will be added to the existing set of 10 national core maternity indicators, 2 existing and 1 additional indicator will undergo further development and 3 will not undergo further development at this time.

Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders: strategies to address information gaps

Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD) is emerging as a public health issue in Australia. Health-care providers and policy makers need accurate and timely data in a useable format to monitor and prevent FASD.This bulletin identifies ways to facilitate the collection and reporting of FASD-related information in Australia. The quality of information available in existing data collections is variable and incomplete for ascertaining cases of FASD. Regular surveillance and monitoring have been identified as priorities for determining incidence and prevalence.

Nomenclature for models of maternity care: a literature review

The report presents a literature review on the development of a nomenclature for models of maternity care in Australia. It is one of several components of the National Maternity Data Development Project and is a companion report to the publication, Foundations for enhanced maternity data collection and reporting in Australia: National Maternity Data Development Project Stage 1.

Nomenclature for models of maternity care: a consultation report

The report presents the findings of consultation on a proposed system for classifying models of maternity care in Australia. It is one of several components of the National Maternity Data Development Project and is a companion report to the publication, Foundations for enhanced maternity data collection and reporting in Australia: National Maternity Data Development Project Stage 1.

Maternal mortality: data linkage methodology

The report presents a data linkage methodology to ascertain the number of maternal and late maternal deaths in Australia. It is one of several components of the National Maternity Data Development Project and is a companion report to the publication, Foundations for enhanced maternity data collection and reporting in Australia: National Maternity Data Development Project Stage 1.

National perinatal mortality data reporting project: issues paper

This paper presents findings on the issues that need to be considered in order to produce a national perinatal mortality report that is relevant to maternity services. It is one of several components of the National Maternity Data Development Project and is a companion report to the publication Foundations for enhanced maternity data collection and reporting in Australia: National Maternity Data Development Project Stage 1.

Stillbirths in Australia 1991-2009

This is the first national report on the epidemiology of stillbirth in Australia. The report makes use of the extensive data about pregnancy and birth that have been collected in all states and territories since 1991. For the period 1991–2009, the stillbirth rate ranged from 6.4–7.8 per 1,000 births.

Maternal deaths in Australia 2006-2010

Maternal deaths in Australia 2006–10 is the 15th report on women who die during pregnancy and childbirth. Although maternal deaths are rare in Australia, they are catastrophic events when they do occur and require monitoring and investigation. The report includes information about the women, pregnancy, and cause of death as well as good practice guidance points for clinicians to inform practice improvement.

Foundations for enhanced maternity data collection and reporting in Australia: National maternity data development project - Stage 1

The report presents findings of Stage 1 of the National Maternity Data Development Project which was established in response to the National Maternity Services Plan. The aim of the project is to build a more comprehensive and consistent national data collection for maternal and perinatal health. National information needs for maternity data were identified and data development commenced. A system for classifying maternity models of care was developed and improved coordination of national maternal mortality data collection was implemented.

Australia's mothers and babies 2011

In 2011, 297,126 women gave birth to 301,810 babies in Australia. This was an increase of 2,247 births (0.8%) than reported in 2010, and a total increase of 18.3% since 2002. Nationally, the proportion of teenage mothers (younger than 20) declined from 3.9% in 2010 to 3.7% in 2011, compared with 4.9% in 2002.

Monitoring asthma in pregnancy: a discussion paper

Asthma in pregnant women may have adverse effects on maternal, fetal and infant outcomes, particularly if expectant mothers experience an exacerbation of asthma while pregnant. Pregnancy, in turn, may have adverse effects on asthma control among expectant mothers. This report outlines a proposed approach to monitoring asthma during pregnancy by capitalising on existing data sources as well as identifying data development opportunities.

The health of Australia's males: from birth to young adulthood (0-24 years)

This report is the third in a series on the health of Australia's males, and focuses on health conditions and risk factors that are age-specific (such as congenital anomalies) and those where large sex differences are observed (such as injury).Findings include:- Male babies born in 2009-2011 can expect to live to the age of 79.7, nearly 5 years less than female babies born the same year (84.2).- While males aged 0-24 are more likely to be hospitalised or die from injury than females of the same age, they are similarly likely to be overweight or obese and less likely to smoke tobacco daily.

National core maternity indicators

This is the first report of ten national core maternity indicators for monitoring the quality of maternity care in Australia. National rates have decreased for smoking in pregnancy, episiotomy among women having their first baby and giving birth vaginally and the proportion of babies born weighing less than 2,750 grams at or after 40 weeks. However for some indicators, including induction of labour, caesarean section and instrumental vaginal birth, rates have increased and point to areas for possible further attention.

Australia's mothers and babies 2010

In 2010, 294,814 women gave birth to 299,563 babies in Australia. The average age of mothers has increased gradually, from 29.2 years in 2001 to 30.0 years in 2010. The caesarean section rate has shown an upward trend over the last 10 years, increasing from 25.4% nationally in 2001 to a peak of 31.6% in 2010.

Maternal morbidity data in Australia: an assessment of the feasibility of standardised collection

This report presents the results of a review of current practices in maternal morbidity data collection.  Definitions, data collection guidelines, validation and uses of the maternal morbidity data by jurisdictions are described. Further action is needed to standardise data collection.

Assisted reproductive technology in Australia and New Zealand 2010

In 2010, there were 61,774 assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatment cycles performed in Australia and New Zealand. Of these, 23.9% resulted in a clinical pregnancy and 18.1% in a live delivery (the birth of at least one liveborn baby). There were 12,056 liveborn babies following ART treatments in 2010.

Perinatal depression: data from the 2010 Australian National Infant Feeding Survey

Data from the 2010 Australian National Infant Feeding Survey showed that 1 in 5 (20%) mothers of children aged 24 months or less had been diagnosed with depression. More than half of these mothers reported being diagnosed with depression during the perinatal  period. Perinatal depression was more commonly reported among mothers who were younger (aged under 25),  smokers, overweight/obese and from lower income households.

Australia's mothers and babies 2009

In 2009, 294,540 women gave birth to 299,220 babies in Australia. The increase in births continued, with 2,295 more births (0.8%) than reported in 2008. The average age of women who gave birth in Australia has increased gradually in recent years, from 29.0 years in 2000 to 30.0 years in 2009.

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