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released: 3 Mar 2011 author: AIHW media release

The 2009 Adult Vaccination Survey forms part of the evaluations of two vaccine programs for older Australia. The first is the National Influenza Vaccination Program for Older Australians, which commenced in 1999; and the second is the National Pneumococcal Vaccination Program for Older Australians which commenced on 1 January 2005. The survey showed that in 2009, 74.6% (2.2 million) Australians aged 65 years or over were vaccinated against influenza. However, only 54.4% (1.6 million) older Australians were currently vaccinated against pneumococcal.

ISBN 978-1-74249-124-0; Cat. no. PHE 135; INTERNET ONLY

Summary

2009 Adult Vaccination Survey

The 2009 Adult Vaccination Survey was a survey of 10,231 Australians aged 18 years or older, conducted during November–December 2009. It was the seventh national survey in the current series. Previous surveys focused predominantly on the National Influenza Vaccination Program for Older Australians.

Participants in the survey were asked about their recent experience of influenza and pneumococcal vaccination, and about their medical and socio-demographic status.

Due to the epidemic of pandemic (H1N1) influenza (commonly referred to as ‘swine flu’), and subsequent government support for vaccination of people against this epidemic from September 2009, this survey included questions on vaccination status of H1N1 influenza. Also for the first time, the survey included questions on pertussis (whooping cough) vaccination for adults.

Main findings

Seasonal influenza

An estimated 74.6% of Australians aged 65 years and over (2.2 million people) were vaccinated against seasonal influenza in 2009. This coverage was similar to that estimated from previous surveys.

The vast majority of these vaccinations (96%) were provided free of charge, either under the government-funded program or by employers (see Figure S.1 for more details).

Pneumococcal disease

An estimated 54.4% of Australians aged 65 years and over (1.6 million people) were currently vaccinated against pneumococcal disease in 2009. This coverage was also similar to that estimated from previous surveys.

A large majority of these vaccinations (96%) were provided free of charge, either under the government-funded program or by employers (see Figure S.2 for more details).

Pandemic (H1N1) influenza

An estimated 18.9% of Australians aged 18 years and over (3.0 million people) had received the pandemic (H1N1) influenza vaccine by December 2009. Uptake was slightly higher in the ‘health and community carer’ at-risk group (26.3%).

Pertussis

An estimated 11.3% of Australians aged 18 years and over had received a pertussis vaccination as an adult or adolescent. Uptake was substantially higher among parents of infants aged less than 12 months old (51.5%).

Figure S.1 chart

Figure S.2 chart

Recommended citation

AIHW 2011. 2009 Adult Vaccination Survey: summary results. Cat. no. PHE 135. Canberra: AIHW. Viewed 5 December 2016 <http://www.aihw.gov.au/publication-detail/?id=10737418409>.

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