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released: 1 Dec 2011 author: AIHW media release

'Cancer in adolescents and young adults in Australia' presents the latest available incidence, survival and mortality statistics on cancer in young Australians aged 15 to 29. The incidence of cancer in this age group has become steady since the mid-1990s while cancer mortality has fallen between 1983 and 2007. Survival from cancer in adolescents and young adults has been relatively high and has improved with time, although cancer outcomes vary across population groups.

ISSN 1039-3307; ISBN 978-1-74249-233-9; Cat. no. CAN 59; 102pp.; Internet only

Publication

Publication table of contents

  • Preliminary material
    • Title and verso pages
    • Contents
    • Acknowledgments
    • Abbreviations
    • Symbols
    • Summary
      • Cancer incidence has become steady and cancer mortality has fallen
      • Melanoma was the most common cancer diagnosed and brain cancer was the leading cause of cancer death
      • Survival from cancer in adolescents and young adults was relatively high and has improved
      • Outcomes for adolescents and young adults vary
  • Body section
    • 1 Introduction
      • Purpose and structure of this report
      • What is cancer?
      • Who are adolescents and young adults?
      • Why is cancer in adolescents and young adults important?
      • How are cancers in adolescents and young adults classified?
      • Data interpretation
      • Data sources
    • 2 Incidence of cancer
      • Introduction
      • How many adolescents and young adults were diagnosed with cancer?
      • Has cancer incidence changed over time?
      • Does cancer incidence differ across population groups?
    • 3 Survival from cancer
      • Introduction
      • What was the prospect of survival for adolescents and young adults with cancer?
      • Has survival from cancer changed over time?
      • Does cancer survival differ across population groups?
    • 4 Mortality from cancer
      • Introduction
      • How many adolescents and young adults died from cancer?
      • Has mortality from cancer changed over time?
      • Does mortality from cancer differ across population groups?
  • End matter
    • Appendixes
      • Appendix A: Classification of cancers in adolescents and young adults
      • Appendix B: Classifications
        • International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems
        • International Classification of Diseases for Oncology
        • SEER adolescent and young adult site recode
      • Appendix C: Statistical methods and technical notes
        • Age-specific rates
        • Age-standardised rates
        • Confidence intervals
        • Joinpoint analysis
        • Male-to-female ratio
        • Relative survival analysis
      • Appendix D: Data sources
        • Australian Cancer Database
        • National Mortality Database
        • Population data
      • Appendix E: Additional tables
        • Additional tables for Chapter 2: Incidence of cancer
        • Additional tables for Chapter 3: Survival from cancer
        • Additional tables for Chapter 4: Mortality from cancer
    • Glossary
    • References
    • List of tables
    • List of figures
    • Related publications

Recommended citation

AIHW 2011. Cancer in adolescents and young adults in Australia. Cancer series no. 62. Cat. no. CAN 59. Canberra: AIHW. Viewed 24 April 2014 <http://www.aihw.gov.au/publication-detail/?id=10737420603>.