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released: 30 Nov 2011 author: AIHW

This report contains detailed analyses against indicators in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework (the HPF) for New South Wales.

ISBN 978-1-74249-251-3; Cat. no. IHW 65; 245pp.; Internet Only

Key findings

This report contains detailed analyses against indicators in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework (the HPF) for New South Wales. The HPF is the basis for monitoring the impact of the National Strategic Framework for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health (NSFATSH) and informs policy analyses, planning and program implementation. The HPF consists of 71 indicators covering three tiers—health status and outcomes, determinants of health and health systems performance.

The key findings in each tier are summarised below, and in tabular form on page xii.

Health status and outcomes

Areas of improvement

  • The proportion of low birthweight babies of Indigenous mothers decreased 8% between 2000 and 2008. The rate ratio Indigenous to non-Indigenous decreased from 2.5 to 2.3 in the same period.
  • Between 1999–2003 and 2004–2008 there was a drop in the Indigenous perinatal mortality rate from 12.5 to 9.6 per 1,000 births. This rate remained relatively constant for other babies in New South Wales at 8.8 per 1,000 births.
  • From 2001–2002 to 2005–2007, the SIDS mortality rate declined from 2.0 to 1.4 deaths per 1,000 live births for Indigenous infants, while remaining stable for non-Indigenous infants.

Areas needing further work

  • Hospitalisation rates among Indigenous people have increased 10% between 2004–05 and 2007–08
    – hospitalisation rate for circulatory disease increased 11%
    – diabetes hospitalisation rate increased 36%
    – hospitalisations for diseases of the ear and mastoid process among children aged 0–14 increased 11%
    – hospitalisations for mental health conditions increased 7%.
  • From 1991 to 2008 there were significant increases in the incidence of end-stage renal disease for Indigenous Australians in New South Wales.
  • Notification for hepatitis C among Indigenous people was four times the rate for other people in 2006-08.
  • There was no significant change in mortality rates between 2001 and 2007:
    – Mortality from all causes showed no significant change for Indigenous people, while there was a decline for non-Indigenous people, thus widening the gap
    – Similarly the gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous deaths from avoidable and preventable causes widened.

Determinants of health

Areas of improvement

  • A high proportion of Indigenous people aged 15 and over were studying in 2008 (20%), compared with non-Indigenous people of the same age (15%).
  • In 2004-05, 99% of Indigenous people reported eating vegetables and 88% eating fruit every day.
  • In 2008, about 70% of Indigenous babies had been breastfed.

Areas needing further work

  • About half of Indigenous men and women were current smokers in 2008.
  • Indigenous mothers were four times as likely as non-Indigenous mothers to smoke during pregnancy (48% and 12% respectively).
  • From 2005-06 to 2008-09, the proportion of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children who were subjects of substantiations increased from 27 per 1,000 to 57 per 1,000. The rate ratio between Indigenous children and other children increased from 5 to 8.
  • Indigenous Australians were 13 times as likely as non-Indigenous people to be imprisoned in 2009 (2,153 and 164 per 100,000 people respectively).

Health system performance

Areas of improvement

  • In 2007, 96% of Indigenous mothers attended at least one antenatal session in pregnancy.
  • 90% of Indigenous children aged 1 and 80% of children aged 2 were fully vaccinated in 2009.
  • The proportion of Indigenous women aged 50–69 who participated in the BreastScreen Australia program increased from 32% to 37% between 2003–04 and 2007–08.

Areas needing further work

  • Over the period 2004–05 to 2007–08 , the gap in hospitalisation rates for potentially preventable acute conditions and potentially preventable chronic conditions for Indigenous people compared with other people increased:
    – the hospitalisation rates for potentially preventable acute conditions increased 16% from 21 to 25 per 1,000 population for Indigenous people, and 8% from 12.3 to 13.3 per 1,000 population for other people
    – the hospitalisation rates for potentially preventable chronic conditions increased 25% from 70 to 88 per 1,000 population for Indigenous people, and for others the rate increased 19% from 21 to 26 per 1,000 population.

Recommended citation

AIHW 2011. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework 2010 report: New South Wales. Cat. no. IHW 65. Canberra: AIHW. Viewed 24 October 2014 <http://www.aihw.gov.au/publication-detail/?id=10737420719>.