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released: 18 Jun 2012 author: AIHW media release

This report presents information on cases of serious injury resulting in hospitalisation due to transport accidents involving a train for the five year period 2004-05 to 2008-09. Over the 5-year period, 868 persons were seriously injured in Australia due to transport accidents involving a train, an average of 174 per year. Over the 5-year period, 248 persons were seriously injured in Australia due to a level crossing accident, an average of 50 per year.

ISSN 144-3791; ISBN 978-1-74249-312-1; Cat. no. INJCAT 144; 40pp.; Internet Only

Summary

This report presents information on cases of serious injury resulting in hospitalisation due to transport accidents involving a train for the five year period 2004–05 to 2008–09.

Serious injury due to transport accidents involving a railway train

Over the 5-year period, 868 persons were seriously injured in Australia due to transport accidents involving a train, an average of 174 per year.

Victoria (37.6%), New South Wales (30.0%) and Queensland (20.2%) accounted for almost 88% of these cases.

Age-standardised rates of serious injury due to transport accidents involving a train declined by an annual average of 5.1% over the 9-year period from 2000–01 to 2008–09.

Based on rail user data, approximately one rail user was seriously injured per 100 million passenger kilometres travelled in 2008–09.

Over the 5-year period, age-specific serious injury rates tended to be higher for those aged 70 years and over, for both sexes.

Rail users made up two-thirds (66.5%) of all serious injury cases due to transport accidents involving a train, with the most common circumstance of injury being injury while boarding or alighting from a train (27.3% of all serious injury cases) over the 5-year period of interest. Pedestrians injured in a collision with a train (15.1%) and car occupants injured in a collision with a train (12.1% of all serious injury cases) accounted for most of the non-rail user cases.

The mean length of stay in hospital for a transport accident involving a train was 7.0 days, which was markedly longer than the mean length of stay for all community injury hospitalisations (4.0 days).

Serious injury due to level crossing accidents

Over the 5-year period, 248 persons were seriously injured in Australia due to a level crossing accident, an average of 50 per year.

Victoria accounted for just over half (50.4%) of level crossing-related serious injury cases, followed by Queensland (24.2%), South Australia (10.1%) and New South Wales (9.7%).

Age-standardised rates of serious injury due to level crossing accidents declined by an annual average of 7.5% over the 9-year period from 2000–01 to 2008–09.

Over the 5-year period, serious injury rates, on an age-specific basis, were highest among young adults (20–24 years).

The most common circumstances of injury involved car occupants injured in a collision with a train (40.3%) and pedestrians injured in a collision with a train (31.5%).

The mean length of stay in hospital for a level crossing accident was 9.2 days, which was more than double the mean length of stay for all community injury hospitalisations (4.0 days).

Recommended citation

AIHW 2012. Serious injury due to land transport accidents involving a railway train, Australia 2004-05 to 2008-09. Injury research and statistics series no. 68. Cat. no. INJCAT 144. Canberra: AIHW. Viewed 25 July 2017 <http://www.aihw.gov.au/publication-detail/?id=10737422001>.

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