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released: 29 Nov 2012 author: AIHW media release

This report examines the experiences of the 252,700 people aged 50 and over who stayed for at least one night in a New South Wales public hospital in 2006-07. Slightly more than 8% of patients (20,800 people) were identified as having dementia. Even allowing for age and sex differences, people with dementia had much higher hospitalisation rates than those without dementia: 26% compared with 12%. They also tended to stay longer in hospital and were more likely to enter or return to residential care on discharge from hospital, or to die in hospital.

ISBN 978-1-74249-368-8; Cat. no. AUS 165; 46pp.; $25

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Publication

Publication table of contents

  • Summary
  • 1 Background
  • 2 Data
    • 2.1 Scope of hospital data
    • 2.2 Statistical significance and standardisation of results
  • 3 People in hospital
    • 3.1 Dementia prevalence
    • 3.2 Use of hospitals
    • 3.3 Types of dementia
    • 3.4 Number of stays per person
  • 4 Features of hospital stays
    • 4.1 Hospital sector
    • 4.2 Region
    • 4.3 Care type
    • 4.4 Principal diagnosis
    • 4.5 Principal procedure
    • 4.6 Elapsed length of stay
    • 4.7 Destination on discharge
    • 4.8 Re-admission
    • 4.9 Conclusion
  • Appendix tables
  • Acknowledgments
  • Symbols
  • References
  • List of tables
  • List of figures
  • List of boxes
  • Other Hospital Dementia Services publications
  • Glossary
  • Verso pages

Recommended citation

AIHW 2012. People with dementia in hospitals in New South Wales 2006-07. AIHW bulletin no. 110. Cat. no. AUS 165. Canberra: AIHW.

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