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released: 19 Dec 2012 author: AIHW media release

Research has shown that vaccinations against influenza and pneumococcal infection can benefit people with obstructive airways disease, which includes asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This report reviews the limited information available in Australia on how many people with asthma and COPD have the vaccination, and finds that the uptake rate is not as high as would be expected if recommendations were being followed. It presents a range of data improvement options that would enhance our ability to monitor vaccination uptake in this and other at-risk population groups.

ISBN 978-1-74249-391-6; Cat. no. ACM 25; 40pp.; $16

printed copy

Publication

Publication table of contents

  • Preliminary material
    • Title and verso pages
    • Contents
    • Acknowledgments
    • Abbreviations
    • Symbols
    • Summary
  • Body section
    • 1 Introduction
      • Background
      • This report
    • 2 Review of vaccination information sources
      • How this review was conducted
      • Registers
      • General Practice and other medical encounters
      • Survey data
      • Published reports
      • Summary of information sources
    • 3 Vaccination status in people with obstructive airways disease
      • Longitudinal Study of Australian Children linked with Australian Childhood Immunisation Register
      • National Health Survey 2004-05
      • National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Survey (NATSIHS) 2004-05
      • Bettering the Evaluation and Care of Health (BEACH) Survey of General Practice
      • Supplementary Analysis of Nominated Data (SAND)
      • Influenza and pneumococcal immunisation among adults with chronic disease living in Queensland
      • Managing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in Australia
      • Summary of findings
    • 4 Discussion
  • End matter
    • Appendix
    • Glossary
    • References
    • List of tables
    • List of figures

Recommended citation

AIHW 2012. Vaccination uptake among people with chronic respiratory disease. Cat. no. ACM 25. Canberra: AIHW.