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released: 28 May 2013 author: AIHW National Injury Surveillance Unit

This report examines the effects of improvements in Indigenous identification in hospitals data on patterns of hospitalised injury among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. The inclusion of hospitalisation data from New South Wales and Victoria has led to a change in the injury profile of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, which appears to be driven by the differences in remoteness between the two groupings.

ISSN 1444-3791; ISBN 978-1-74249-428-9; Cat. no. INJCAT 149; 68pp.; $13

printed copy

Publication

Publication table of contents

  • Preliminary material
    • Title and verso pages
    • Contents
    • Acknowledgments
    • Abbreviations
    • Symbols
    • Summary
      • Key findings
      • The message
  • Body section
    • 1 Introduction
      • 1.1 Purpose
      • 1.2 Overview of report
      • 1.3 Terminology
      • 1.4 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander identification in hospital separations data
    • 2 Indigenous population data
      • 2.1 Age and sex
      • 2.2 Remoteness
    • 3 Key indicators of injury hospitalisation
      • 3.1 Overview
      • 3.2 Key injury indicators
    • 4 Priority Indigenous injury issues
      • 4.1 Social and emotional wellbeing
      • 4.2 Child and young people's safety
      • 4.3 Violence affecting families and individuals
      • 4.4 Land transport
      • 4.5 Summary
  • End matter
    • Appendix: Data issues
    • References
    • List of tables
    • List of figures

Recommended citation

AIHW National Injury Surveillance Unit 2013. Impact of improvements to Indigenous identification in hospital data on patterns of hospitalised injury. Injury research and statistics series 73. Cat. no. INJCAT 149. Canberra: AIHW.