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released: 30 May 2013 author: Ha DH, Amarasena N & Crocombe L media release

This publication describes the dental health of Australian children examined by school dental service staff in 2009 and provides insights into the dental health of rural children. Dental decay was relatively common, with around half of children examined having a history of decay. Children in Regional and Remote areas were at increased risk of dental decay in their baby teeth compared with those in Major cities.

ISSN 1321-0254; ISBN 978-1-74249-427-2; Cat. no. DEN 225; 56pp.; $12

printed copy

Publication

Publication table of contents

  • Preliminary material
    • Contents
    • Acknowledgments
    • Abbreviations
    • Symbols
    • Summary
  • Body section
    • 1 Introduction
      • 1.1 What is dental decay?
      • 1.2 Risk factors
      • 1.3 Prevention
      • 1.4 Measuring dental decay
      • 1.5 Measuring remoteness
      • 1.6 Data in this report
    • 2 The dental health of Australia's children by age
      • 2.1 Deciduous teeth
      • 2.2 Permanent teeth
      • 2.3 All teeth
    • 3 The dental health of Australia's children by remoteness
      • 3.1 Background
      • 3.2 Children's dental decay by remoteness
    • 4 Dental decay by state and territory
      • 4.1 Children aged 5-6
      • 4.2 Children aged 12
      • 4.3 Decay of combined deciduous and permanent teeth
      • 4.4 Decay by remoteness
    • 5. Fissure sealants
      • 5.1 By age
      • 5.2 By remoteness
  • End matter
    • Appendixes
      • Appendix A: Description of survey methods
        • Source of subjects
        • Sampling
        • Data items
        • Weighting of data and data analysis
        • Number in sample
      • Appendix B: Data quality statement
    • References
    • List of tables
    • List of figures

Recommended citation

Ha DH, Amarasena N & Crocombe L 2013. The dental health of Australia's children by remoteness: Child Dental Health Survey Australia 2009. Dental statistics and research series 63. Cat. no. DEN 225. Canberra: AIHW.