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released: 25 Jul 2013 author: AIHW media release

Despite being a relatively small group, research indicates that young people aged 10-14 in the youth justice system are at risk of becoming chronic, long-term offenders. Data show that most (85%) young people born in 1993-94 who were supervised at age 10-14 returned to (or continued under) supervision when they were 15-17. They were more likely than those first supervised at older ages to experience all types of supervision when 15-17, and spent more time in total under supervision.

ISSN 1833-3230; ISBN 978-1-74249-466-1; Cat. no. JUV 19; 40pp.; $18

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Publication

Publication table of contents

  • Preliminary material
    • Title and verso pages
    • Contents
    • Acknowledgments
    • Abbreviations
    • Summary
  • Body section
    • 1 Introduction
    • 2 How many young people aged 10-14 are involved in the youth justice system?
    • 3 Which young people aged 10-14 are involved in crime?
      • 3.1 What are the risk factors for involvement in crime?
      • 3.2 Which groups are more likely to be involved in crime?
    • 4 How are young people aged 10-14 involved in crime?
      • 4.1 What types of offences do they commit?
      • 4.2 Are they also victims of crime?
    • 5 How do young people aged 10-14 experience youth justice supervision?
      • 5.1 How do they first enter supervision?
      • 5.2 What types of supervision do they experience?
      • 5.3 How long do they spend under supervision?
      • 5.4 Are they likely to be supervised beyond age 14?
    • 6 Has involvement in crime changed over time?
      • 6.1 Have numbers and rates changed?
      • 6.2 Have the types of offences changed?
      • 6.3 What are some emerging issues?
    • 7 What is the impact of involvement in crime atage 10-14?
      • 7.1 Is there a relationship between early involvement in crime and later offending?
      • 7.2 How can involvement in crime impact on their lives?
    • 8 How can the offending behaviour of young people aged 10-14 be reduced?
      • 8.1 What types of interventions are available?
      • 8.2 What makes effective interventions?
      • 8.3 What is the evidence on Australian interventions?
  • End matter
    • Appendixes
      • Appendix 1: Programs and services for young people aged 10-14 under supervision
      • Appendix 2: Technical notes
    • References
    • List of figures and table
    • More information and related publications

Recommended citation

AIHW 2013. Young people aged 10-14 in the youth justice system 2011-12. Juvenile justice series 12. Cat. no. JUV 19. Canberra: AIHW.