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released: 21 Aug 2013 author: AIHW: Pointer S media release

This report focuses on trends in hospitalisations due to injury and poisoning that occurred over the period 1999-00 to 2010-11. Information is also presented on the incidence of hospitalised injury in the financial year 2010-11. Age-standardised rates of injury cases increased from 1999-00 to 2010-11 by an average of 1% per year. Increases per year across the period were found for injuries due to: falls (2%), intentional self-harm (1), assaults (0.5%) and other unintentional injuries (1.4%). Significant decreases occurred in the rate of hospitalisations due to poisoning by pharmaceuticals (5%) and by other substances (4%), and drowning and near drowning (1%, and 3% for children 0-4). Among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people rates of injury increased from 3,268 cases per 100,000 population in 2007-08 to 3,708 per 100,000 in 2010-11. Analysis of different injury types revealed increases in rates of poisoning by pharmaceuticals, falls, intentional self-harm and other unintentional injuries during this time.

ISSN 1444-3791; ISBN 978-1-74249-468-5; Cat. no. INJCAT 162; 192pp.; $22

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Publication

Publication table of contents

  • Preliminary material
    • Title and verso page
    • Contents
    • Abbreviations
    • Symbols
    • Summary
  • Body section
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Overview of hospitalised injury
    • 3. Severity of injury
    • 4. Transport
    • 5. Drowning and submersion
    • 6. Poisoning, pharmaceuticals
    • 7. Poisoning, other substances
    • 8. Falls
    • 9. Smoke, fire, heat and hot substances
    • 10. Intentional self-harm
    • 11. Assault
    • 12. Other unintentional injuryinjury
  • End matter
    • Appendix A: Data issues
    • Appendix B: Additional tables
    • Glossary
    • References
    • List of tables
    • List of figures
    • Related publications

Recommended citation

AIHW: Pointer S 2013. Trends in hospitalised injury, Australia: 1999-00 to 2010-11. Injury research and statistics series 86. Cat. no. INJCAT 162. Canberra: AIHW.