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released: 26 Jun 2014 author: AIHW media release

The pattern of coronary heart disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in Indigenous Australians differs to that in non-Indigenous Australians. This paper shows that Indigenous Australians have higher hospitalisation and death rates for these conditions than non-Indigenous Australians, and are more likely to die from these conditions at younger ages. However there are some encouraging trends seen in the Indigenous population, such as declining death rates from coronary heart disease, improved chronic disease management and declining smoking rates.

ISBN 978-1-74249-583-5; Cat. no. IHW 126; 56pp.; Internet Only

Publication

Publication table of contents

  • Preliminary material
    • Title and verso page
    • Contents
    • Acknowledgments
    • Abbreviations
    • Summary
  • Body section
    • 1 Introduction
      • 1.1 Policy context
      • 1.2 Purpose and structure of this paper
    • 2 Coronary heart disease
      • 2.1 Risk factors
      • 2.2 Prevalence
      • 2.3 Hospitalisations
      • 2.4 Mortality
    • 3 Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
      • 3.1 Risk factors
      • 3.2 Prevalence
      • 3.3 Hospitalisations
      • 3.4 Mortality
      • 3.5 COPD, lung cancer and tobacco smoking
    • 4 Using indicators to monitor CHD and COPD management
      • 4.1 Healthy for Life
      • 4.2 National Key Performance Indicators for Indigenous-specific primary health-care services
      • 4.3 Evaluation of the Indigenous Chronic Disease Package
    • 5 Conclusion
  • End matter
    • Appendix A: Data sources
    • Appendix B: Technical information
    • Appendix C: Additional tables
    • References

Recommended citation

AIHW 2014. Coronary heart disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in Indigenous Australians. Cat. no. IHW 126. Canberra: AIHW. Viewed 25 June 2016 <http://www.aihw.gov.au/publication-detail/?id=60129547716>.

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