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Young people returning to sentenced youth justice supervision 2014–15

Most young people who have a supervised sentence serve only 1 sentence and do not return. For those born from 1990–91 to 1996–97, around 62% received only 1 sentence before the age of 18. The younger a person is at the time of first receiving a supervision sentence, the more likely they are to return.Of the young people aged 10–16 in 2013–14 and released from sentenced community-based supervision, around 23% returned to sentenced supervision in 6 months, and 46% returned within 12 months. Of those released from sentenced detention, 50% returned to sentenced supervision within 6 months and 74% returned within 12 months.

Youth justice in Australia 2014–15

There were about 5,600 young people (aged 10 and older) under youth justice supervision in Australia on an average day in 2014–15, due to their involvement, or alleged involvement, in crime. This number has decreased by 23% over the 5 years to 2014–15. Around 4 in 5 (82%) young people under supervision on an average day were male. Most (85%) young people were supervised in the community and the remainder were in detention. Although rates of supervision decreased over the 5-year period for both Indigenous and non-Indigenous young people, the level of Indigenous over-representation increased.

Western Australia: youth justice supervision in 2014–15

This fact sheet focuses on youth justice supervision in Western Australia in 2014–15, and includes some national comparisons.This is one of a series of fact sheets on youth justice supervision in 2014–15.

Victoria: youth justice supervision in 2014–15

This fact sheet focuses on youth justice supervision in Victoria in 2014–15 and includes some national comparisons.This is one of a series of fact sheets on youth justice supervision in 2014–15.

Tasmania: youth justice supervision in 2014–15

This fact sheet focuses on youth justice supervision in Tasmania in 2014–15, and includes some national comparisons.This is one of a series of fact sheets on youth justice supervision in 2014–15.

South Australia: youth justice supervision in 2014–15

This fact sheet focuses on youth justice supervision in South Australia in 2014–15, and includes some national comparisons.This is one of a series of fact sheets on youth justice supervision in 2014–15.

Queensland: youth justice supervision in 2014–15

This fact sheet focuses on youth justice supervision in Queensland in 2014–15, and includes some national comparisons.This is one of a series of fact sheets on youth justice supervision in 2014–15.

Australian Capital Territory: youth justice supervision in 2014–15

This fact sheet focuses on youth justice supervision in the Australian Capital Territory in 2014–15, and includes some national comparisons.This is one of a series of fact sheets on youth justice supervision in 2014–15.

New South Wales: youth justice supervision in 2014–15

This fact sheet focuses on youth justice supervision in New South Wales in 2014–15, and includes some national comparisons.This is one of a series of fact sheets on youth justice supervision in 2014–15.

Northern Territory: youth justice supervision in 2014–15

This fact sheet focuses on youth justice supervision in Northern Territory in 2014–15, and includes some national comparisons.This is one of a series of fact sheets on youth justice supervision in 2014–15.

Young people in child protection and under youth justice supervision 2013–14

This report presents information on young people aged 10–17 who were involved in the child protection system and under youth justice supervision in 2013–14, and demonstrates the insights that can be gained through data linkage. Nearly half (45%) of young people in youth justice detention were also in the child protection system in the same year. Those who were younger at their first youth justice supervision were more likely to also be in child protection.

Youth detention population in Australia 2015

This bulletin presents information on the youth detention population in Australia, focusing on quarterly trends from June 2011 to June 2015. There were fewer than 900 young people in detention on an average night in the June quarter 2015, just over half (55%) of whom were unsentenced. Numbers and rates of young people in detention dropped slightly over the 4 years, but trends varied among the states and territories. Just over half (54%) of all young people in detention on an average night were Indigenous.

Developing a linked data collection to report on the relationships between child protection and youth justice supervision

Using available national data to understand the characteristics of children and young people who are both in the child protection system and under youth justice supervision, and their pathways through these systems, would assist support staff, case workers and policy makers to achieve optimal outcomes for children and young people and for their families. This report describes how these data collections can be linked and how the relationships between child protection and youth justice supervision can be explored.

Pathways through youth justice supervision: further analyses

This report looks at the complete youth justice supervision history of 24,102 young people in Australia, who experienced supervision, both in the community and in detention, between 1 July 2000 and 30 June 2014 when they were aged 10–17. More than one-third (37%) of young people experienced the most common pathway of sentenced community-based supervision only. Young people spent a median of 303 days (about 10 months) under supervision in total, and completed a median of 2 periods of supervision. About 11% of young people had a pathway that was considered ‘extensive’, and these young people accounted for about one-third (32%) of the total days of supervision and nearly half (45%) of all supervision periods.

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