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Youth justice orders and supervision periods: 2013–14

This fact sheet summarises information on the number of supervised orders administered by state and territory youth justice agencies, and the periods of supervision experienced by young people in 2013–14. To some extent, differences between states and territories in the numbers and types of legal orders can reflect differences in legislation and legal and administrative practices.

Long-term trends in youth justice supervision: 2013–14

This fact sheet summarises the long-term trends in rates of young people under youth justice supervision. It includes 8-year national trends, and trends for individual states and territories for up to 10 years.

Types of community-based youth justice supervision: 2013–14

This fact sheet outlines the types of community-based supervision that young people experienced in Australia in 2013–14. Young people may be supervised under one or more of the following types of orders: unsentenced orders (while awaiting the outcome of a court matter or sentencing)—such as supervised or conditional bail; sentenced orders (after being proven guilty in court)—such as probation and similar orders, suspended detention and parole or supervised release. Young people may be supervised under multiple orders of different types at the same time, and parole or supervised release orders may be interrupted by time spent in detention.

Young people in unsentenced detention: 2013–14

 This fact sheet summarises information about young people in unsentenced detention in Australia in 2013–14.Young people may be in unsentenced detention when they have been charged with an offence and are awaiting the outcome of their court matter, or when they have been found or pleaded guilty and are awaiting sentencing. Young people may be referred to unsentenced detention by either police (pre-court) or a court (known as remand). Police-referred pre-court detention is not available in all states and territories, and most young people in unsentenced detention are on remand.

Young people in sentenced detention: 2013–14

This fact sheet provides summary information about young people in sentenced detention in 2013–14. Young people may be sentenced to a period of detention if they are proven guilty in a court. This includes young people who have received orders such as control orders, revocation of parole and youth residential orders.

Remoteness, socioeconomic status and youth justice supervision: 2013–14

This fact sheet provides information about the remoteness area and socioeconomic status of young people under supervision during 2013–14, based on their last known address.

First entry to youth justice supervision: 2013–14

This fact sheet provides information about the first entry to youth justice supervision among young people who were supervised during 2013–14.

Youth detention entries and exits: 2013–14

This fact sheet provides information about the numbers of young people under youth justice supervision who were received into, and/or released from, detention in 2013–14. A reception is when a young person enters detention having not been detained immediately before. Conversely, a release is when a young person leaves detention and is not detained immediately after.

Comparisons between Australian and international youth justice systems: 2013–14

This fact sheet examines Australian and international approaches to youth justice.

Comparisons between the youth and adult justice systems: 2013–14

This fact sheet summarises some of the similarities and differences between young people and adults in the justice systems in Australia.

Youth justice supervision history: 2013–14

This fact sheet summarises the supervision histories of young people who were under youth justice supervision during 2013–14.

Young people returning to sentenced youth justice supervision 2015

The rate of return to sentenced youth justice supervision is an indicator of the effectiveness of the services provided to young people serving supervised sentences. Around 20% of those aged 10–16 when released from sentenced community-based supervision in 2012–13 returned to sentenced supervision in 6 months, and 44% returned within 12 months. The rate of return was higher for those released from sentenced detention: 50% returned to sentenced supervision within 6 months and 76% returned within 12 months.

Youth justice in Australia 2013–14

There were 6,100 young people under youth justice supervision in Australia on an average day in 2013–14, due to their involvement, or alleged involvement, in crime. This number has fallen from about 6,400 in 2012–13. Most (85%) of these young people were supervised in the community and the remainder were in detention. Young people spent 26 weeks, on average, under supervision during the year.

Australian Capital Territory: youth justice supervision in 2013–14

This fact sheet focuses on youth justice supervision in the Australian Capital Territory in 2013–14, and includes some national comparisons. This is one of a series of fact sheets on youth justice supervision in 2013–14.

New South Wales: youth justice supervision in 2013–14

This fact sheet focuses on youth justice supervision in New South Wales in 2013–14, and includes some national comparisons. This is one of a series of fact sheets on youth justice supervision in 2013–14.

Northern Territory: youth justice supervision in 2013–14

This fact sheet focuses on youth justice supervision in the Northern Territory in 2013–14, and includes some national comparisons.This is one of a series of fact sheets on youth justice supervision in 2013–14.

Queensland: youth justice supervision in 2013–14

This fact sheet focuses on youth justice supervision in Queensland in 2013–14, and includes some national comparisons. This is one of a series of fact sheets on youth justice supervision in 2013–14.

South Australia: youth justice supervision in 2013–14

This fact sheet focuses on youth justice supervision in South Australia during 2013–14 and provides some comparisons to the national context. This is one of a series of fact sheets on youth justice supervision in 2013–14.

Tasmania: youth justice supervision in 2013–14

This fact sheet focuses on youth justice supervision in Tasmania during 2013–14 and provides some comparisons to the national context. This is one of a series of fact sheets on youth justice supervision in 2013–14.

Victoria: youth justice supervision in 2013–14

This fact sheet focuses on youth justice supervision in Victoria during 2013–14 and provides some comparisons to the national context. This is one of a series of fact sheets on youth justice supervision in 2013–14.

Western Australia: youth justice supervision in 2013–14

This fact sheet focuses on youth justice supervision in Western Australia during 2013–14 and provides some comparisons to the national context. This is one of a series of fact sheets on youth justice supervision in 2013–14.

Using the Juvenile Justice National Minimum Data Set to measure returns to sentenced youth justice supervision: stage 2

This is the second of 2 reports presenting measures of returns to sentenced youth justice supervision using data from the Juvenile Justice National Minimum Data Set (JJ NMDS). This report further examines timeframes for measuring returns and explores the potential for using JJ NMDS data to measure the seriousness of reoffending. A number of recommendations are made, including that timeframes of 6 months and 1 year be used; that an increase in sentence severity be used as an interim proxy indicator of escalating offending behaviour; and that future work include reporting on returns to sentenced supervision on an annual basis.

Youth detention population in Australia 2014

This report presents information on the youth detention population in Australia, focusing on quarterly trends from June 2010 to June 2014. On an average night, close to 1,000 young people were in detention, about half of whom were unsentenced. Nationally, numbers and rates of young people in detention remained relatively stable over the 4 years; but trends varied among states and territories. About half of all young people in detention on an average night were Indigenous.

Youth justice orders and supervision periods: 2012-13

This fact sheet summarises information on the number of supervised orders administered by state and territory youth justice agencies, and the periods of supervision experienced by young people in 2012-13. To some extent, differences between states and territories in the numbers and types of legal orders can reflect differences in legislation and legal and administrative practices.

Time under youth justice supervision: 2012-13

This fact sheet is about how long young people spent under youth justice supervision in 2012–13.

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