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A snapshot of men's health in regional and remote Australia

Men in rural regions of Australia may face distinct health issues because of their location, work and lifestyle. This report provides a snapshot of some of these issues and compares the illness and mortality of men in rural and urban areas.Overall, men in rural areas are more likely than their urban counterparts to experience chronic health conditions and risk factors. For example, they: are more likely to report daily smoking and risky drinking behaviour; are less likely to possess an adequate level of health literacy; have higher mortality rates from injury, cardiovascular disease and diabetes. This report is a useful resource for policymakers, researchers and others interested in emerging men's health policies in Australia.

Cardiovascular medicines and primary health care: a regional analysis

Cardiovascular medicines and primary health care: a regional analysis shows how the supply of cardiovascular medicines and primary health-care services differs across regions in Australia. This report examines the complex relationship between cardiovascular diseases, remoteness and the supply of cardiovascular medicines and primary health-care services. It will be of interest to policy makers, providers of health services, researchers in the field of cardiovascular disease, and members of the broader community.

AIHW Access no. 26: November 2009

Access is a newsletter published by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, profiling the Institute's work and its people.

Rural, regional and remote health: indicators of health system performance

This report focuses on a comprehensive range of health issues concerning people living in regional and remote Australia. It includes information relating to health system performance (such as health service usage and supply of health workers) and is the 10th report in the AIHW's Rural Health Series.

The effectiveness of the Illicit Drug Diversion Initiative in rural and remote Australia

The Illicit Drug Diversion Initiative (IDDI) provides a nationally consistent framework through which police and courts may refer eligible drug offenders towards appropriate assessment, education or drug treatment. This report presents an evaluation of the effectiveness of the IDDI in rural and remote Australia, drawing on quantitative and qualitative evidence to explore the extent to which the stated objectives of the IDDI have been achieved in rural and remote locations.

Rural, regional and remote health: indicators of health status and determinants of health

This report focuses on a comprehensive range of health issues concerning people living in rural, regional and remote Australia. It includes information relating to health status (such as rates of chronic disease, injury and mental health) and determinants of health (such as tobacco smoking, alcohol consumption, nutrition and physical activity) and is the 9th report in the AIHW's Rural health series.

Rural, regional and remote health: a study on mortality (2nd edition)

Death rates are a useful indicator of the underlying health status of a population. In general, people living in regional and remote Australia have higher death rates than those living in major cities. This report, the eighth in the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare's rural health series, describes the patterns of death in regional and remote areas and quantifies the difference in death rates amongst people living in major cities and those living outside them.

Urban and rural variations in child oral health

This report provides information on the oral health of Australian children during 2001, and investigates differences in the oral health between children living in rural and urban areas. Children from rural areas have often been found to have poorer health outcomes than their urban counterparts. This report compares oral health status and receipt of fissure sealants across residential locations and evaluates whether socioeconomic factors account for geographic variation.

Rural, regional and remote health: mortality trends 1992-2003

This report compares changes in mortality in Australia's major cities, regional and remote areas in the period 1992-2003. Trends for Australia's broad geographic regions are compared for a range of specific causes of death including coronary heart disease, lung cancer, cervical cancer, asthma, suicide, motor vehicle traffic accidents, diabetes and many others.

Rural, regional and remote health: information framework and indicators. Version 1b

This report updates Version 1 of the framework, capitalising on the experience gained while reporting against the indicators. The structure of the framework has not been altered and new indicators have not been added, but issues such as data availability and statistical methods have been updated, and practical advice is offered for those who contemplate reporting against the indicators

Oral health and access to dental care - rural and remote dwellers

This report provides information on the oral health and use of dental services among rural and remote dwellers in Australia. Comparisons are provided by geographic region to investigate whether persons living outside the main population centres are more disadvantaged than their urban counterparts.

Rural, regional and remote health: indicators of health

This report focuses on a comprehensive range of rural health issues including: health status, determinants of health, and health service provision, and is the first systematic comparison of its kind.

Rural, regional and remote health: a guide to remoteness classifications

The development over the last decade of geographical classifications for Australia that describe areas in terms of relative remoteness has provided an opportunity to compare a wide range of health and welfare indicators across Australia's major cities, regional and remote areas. This publication reviews the methodology behind the three major classifications that describe areas in this way - the RRMA (Rural, Remote and Metropolitan Areas) classification, the ARIA (Accessibility/Remoteness Index of Australia) classification and the ASGC (Australian Standard Geographical Classification) Remoteness Areas classification. This publication also summarises each classification's strengths and weaknesses and describes how the classifications are applied to administrative and survey data.

Rural, regional and remote health, a study on mortality: summary of findings

This report summarises the findings of the AIHW report Rural, Regional and Remote Health: A Study on Mortality. This report updates and builds on findings from the 1998 AIHW report, Health in Rural and Remote Australia, which identified higher death rates outside major metropolitan areas. However, it has been unclear how much of these higher death rates are due to rural health issues, or Indigenous health issues.This report largely resolves this uncertainty by controlling for Indigenous status and describing for each region: differences in death rates; trends in mortality over time; and how many more deaths occurred than were expected (if lower major cities rates had applied in each region).

Rural, regional and remote health, a study on mortality

This report updates and builds on findings from the 1998 AIHW report, Health in Rural and Remote Australia, which identified higher death rates outside major metropolitan areas. However, it has been unclear how much of these higher death rates are due to rural health issues, or Indigenous health issues.This report largely resolves this uncertainty by controlling for Indigenous status and describing for each region: differences in death rates; trends in mortality over time; and how many more deaths occurred than were expected (if lower major cities rates had applied in each region).

Rural, regional and remote health: information framework and indicators. Version 1

Information about key rural health issues is frequently inadequate. This information framework describes which questions need answering; what data is available and pitfalls in its analysis; which questions can't be answered and what we can do about it. Based on the National Health Performance Framework and written in consultation with a wide range of data experts, 'Version One' of the framework is a 'living' document, designed to be updated as data sources are improved, further data gaps are identified and more advanced methodologies are developed.

Oral health of public dental patients in rural areas

Oral health among adults in Australia has improved in recent decades, with dramatic reductions in complete tooth loss. However, public dental patients remain a group with reported high levels of emergency care and associated higher levels of tooth extraction compared with the general population (DSRU, 1993). This report describes the oral health of public dental patients in rural and urban areas by age and type of visit based on a total of 2,746 dental patients who were examined by the dental authorities in four States/Territories of Australia, providing a representative sample of the public dental patients they treated during the 2001-02 period.

Rural oral health and access to dental care - 1994-96 and 1999

This report provides information on some aspects of oral health and the use of dental services in rural and remote areas of Australia. Historically, higher rates of tooth loss and problem-oriented dental visiting patterns have been characteristic of rural and remote areas. Differences by cardholder status and geographical location are presented. Comparisons between the National Dental Telephone Interview Survey 1999 and combined data from the 1994, 1995 and 1996 surveys have been included.

It's different in the bush, a comparison of general practice activity in metropolitan and rural areas of Australia 1998-2000

Gives a secondary analysis of data from the first two years of the BEACH (Bettering the Evaluation and Care of Health) program, April 1998 to March 2000. It reports differences in rural and metropolitan general practice based on information on over 200,000 GP-patient encounters from a random sample of 2,014 GPs.Comparisons are made in terms of characteristics of the general practitioners; types of services they provide; characteristics of the patients; problems managed at the GP-patient encounters and the management techniques adopted by the GPs.

Oral health and access to dental care in rural and remote areas of Australia: research report, September 1999

This report provides information on some aspects of oral health and use of dental services in rural and remote areas. Australians in rural and remote areas are at a disadvantage in accessing dental care due to the lack of availability of dentists and other oral health facilities, and the greater distances involved. Capital cities have almost double the rate of practising dentists per 100,000 population than the rest of Australia (51.2 cf. 28.7). A higher rate of problem-oriented dental visits and fewer people making a recent visit are the most striking differences in access to dental services in country areas. These differences leave residents of rural and remote areas in poorer health than their urban counterparts.

Adult access to dental care, rural and remote dwellers

Examines the issues of oral health and access to dental care for adult Australians living in rural and remote areas. It compare the results of people from rural, remote and urban locations at three different levels: the adult population; cardholders who are eligible for publicly funded dental care; and recipients of publicly funded dental services. This report is one of a number of publications investigating adult access to dental care in Australia, and was produced by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare's Dental Statistics and Research Unit.

Health in rural and remote Australia: the first report of the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare on rural health

Compares the health of people living in rural and remote areas with that of people living in metropolitan areas across Australia. The report shows that people living in rural and remote areas have many health disadvantages their urban counterparts do not experience, including: shortages of health care providers and services in some areas, difficulties in accessing health care and greater exposure to injury.