• Print

Health workforce

Most recent information on the health workforce is available online. Data tables are also available.

Community services workforce

Most recent information on the community services workforce is included in Australia’s welfare 2013 (Chapter 9). Older data is available in previous editions of Australia's welfare, and Information relating to the community services workforce (2006).

Workforce publications

Medical workforce 2012

The supply of employed medical practitioners in Australia increased from 323.2 to 355.6 full-time equivalent practitioners per 100,000 population between 2008 and 2012, which reflected a 16.4% rise in employed practitioner numbers. Women made up 37.9% of practitioners in 2012 compared with 34.9% in 2008.

Dental workforce 2012

The number of dental practitioners registered in Australia in 2012 was 19,462, of whom 14,687 (75.5%) were dentists. The supply of employed dentists increased slightly from 55.4 to 56.9 full-time equivalent practitioners per 100,000 population between 2011 and 2012, which reflected a 5.3% increase in dentists.The gender balance continued to shift, with women making up 36.5% of dentists in 2012 compared with 35.2% in 2011. The average hours worked each week by dentists decreased slightly from 37.3 to 37.0; and those working part time increased from 30.8% to 31.7%.

Nursing and midwifery workforce 2012

This report outlines the workforce characteristics of nurses and midwives in 2012. Between 2008 and 2012, the number of nurses and midwives employed in nursing or midwifery increased by 7.5%, from 269,909 to 290,144. During this period, nursing and midwifery supply increased by 0.5%, from 1,117.8 to 1,123.6 full-time equivalent nurses and midwives per 100,000 population. In 2012, the proportion of employed nurses and midwives aged 50 or older was 39.1%, an increase from 35.1% in 2008.

Allied health workforce 2012

This report outlines the workforce characteristics of 11 allied health practitioners for 2011 and 2012. In 2012, more than 4 in 5 registered practitioners were actively employed in their profession (from 76.2% for psychologists to 92.3% for podiatrists). For most professions there were more women than men employed. The average working week for employed practitioners ranged from 31.8 hours for Chinese medicine practitioners to 40.5 hours for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health practitioners.

Dental workforce 2011

The number of dental practitioners registered in Australia in 2011 was 18,803, of whom 14,179 were dentists. The supply of employed dentists increased from 50.9 to 56.1 full-time equivalent practitioners per 100,000 population between 2006 and 2011, which reflected a 22.4% increase in dentists. The gender balance continued to shift, with women making up 35.6% of dentists in 2011 compared with 29.0% in 2006. The average hours worked each week by dentists decreased slightly from 38.5 to 37.4.

Medical workforce 2011

The supply of employed medical practitioners in Australia increased from 344.6 to 381.4 full-time equivalent practitioners per 100,000 population between 2007 and 2011, which reflected a 10.7% rise in practitioner numbers. The gender balance continued to shift, with women making up 37.6% of practitioners in 2011 compared with 34% in 2007.  Specialists-in-training in the public sector worked the most average hours per week (47.6) while general practitioners in the public sector worked the least (20.5).

Nursing and midwifery workforce 2011

Between 2007 and 2011, the number of nurses and midwives employed in nursing increased by 7.7% from 263,331 to 283,577.    Over this period, the supply of nurses and midwives decreased  by 1.3% from 1,095.1 to 1,081.1 full-time equivalent positions per 100,000 population. The average age of the workforce increased from 43.7 to 44.5, and the proportion of nurses and midwives aged 50 or older increased from 33.0% to 38.6%.

Trends in the Australian Dental Labour Force, 2000 to 2009: dental labour force collection, 2009

Trends in the Australian Dental Labour Force, 2000 to 2009 presents findings from the 2009 national dental labour force data collection and explores trends since 2000. The collection includes all dentists (general dental practitioners and specialists), dental hygienists, dental therapists, oral health therapists and dental prosthetists across Australia. There was an overall increase in the number of dental professionals over this period. Dental therapists were the only group to decrease in number because of the move towards dual qualified oral health therapists.

Medical labour force 2009

The supply of employed medical practitioners increased between 2005 and 2009, from 323 to 350 full-time equivalent practitioners per 100,000 population, based on a 40-hour week. The increase reflected a 20.7% rise in practitioner numbers. The gender balance continued to shift, with women making up 36% of practitioners in 2009 compared to 33% in 2005. The average hours worked by medical practitioners declined from 43.7 to 42.2 hours.

Nursing and midwifery labour force 2009

The supply of nurses increased by 6.2% between 2005 and 2009, from 1,040 full time equivalent (FTE) nurses per 100,000 population to 1,105 FTE nurses based on a 38-hour week. This was mainly a result of both a 13.3% increase in the number of employed nurses, and a 0.9% increase in the average hours they worked over this period. Nursing continued to be a female dominated profession, with females comprising 90.4% of employed nurses in 2009 (down slightly from 92.1% in 2005).

Eye health labour force in Australia

The delivery of eye health care in Australia is undertaken by an eye health labour force that consists of ophthalmologists, ophthalmic nurses, optometrists, orthoptists, optical dispensers and optical mechanics. The number of full-time equivalent ophthalmologists, optometrists and orthoptists increased by 15%, 11% and 20% respectively between 2001 and 2006. Ophthalmologists are on average older than other eye health workers. In 2006 the average age of ophthalmologists was 52 years. The average age of the other eye health occupations ranged from 36 years (orthoptists) to 46 years (ophthalmic nurses).

Medical labour force 2006

This report presents demographic and labour force statistics on the medical profession in Australia and trends in the number of employed doctors. It is based on the main findings of the 2006 national survey of registered medical practitioners. Information presented includes a national and state/territory overview of the number of medical practitioners (including age and sex, field of medicine, working hours and where they work), their geographic region and overall supply.

Labour force participation and employment in public rental housing in Australia

This bulletin presents analysis of the labour force participation and employment levels among public rental housing tenants in Australia. Using the AIHW National Housing Assistance Data Repository and results from the National Social Housing Survey of public rental housing tenants, we analyse the differences between those households who are currently engaged in work versus those who are not. Secondly, we discuss the different influences that tenants purport for not working full time and identify how these vary depending on a tenant's particular circumstances. We also examine why tenants may not be participating in the labour force: either partially or not at all. Overall, the bulletin provides valuable information for policy makers and researchers alike, highlighting the complex issues surrounding the economic participation of public rental housing tenants.

Dental labour force in Australia, 2005

This report provides information on the dentist labour force in Australia based on the 2005 national dental labour force collection. Where appropriate, comparisons have been made with data drawn from the most recent collection (2003).

Dental hygienist labour force in Australia, 2005

This report provides information on the dental hygienist labour force in Australia based on  the  2005  national dental labour force survey. Where appropriate, comparisons have been made with data from the most recent previous collection (2003).

Medical labour force 2005

This report presents demographic and labour force statistics on the medical profession in Australia and trends in the number of employed doctors. It is based on the main findings of the 2005 national survey of registered medical practitioners. Information presented includes a national and state/territory overview of the number of medical practitioners, their geographic region and overall supply.

Medical labour force 2004

This report presents demographic and labour force statistics on the medical profession in Australia and trends in the number of employed doctors. It is based on the main findings of the 2004 national survey of registered medical practitioners. Information presented includes a national and state/territory overview of the number of medical practitioners, their geographical region and overall supply.

Podiatry labour force 2003

This report presents statistics on podiatrists in Australia. It is based on the main findings of the 2003 survey of podiatrists in New South Wales, Victoria, Queensland, South Australia and Tasmania. Information presented in the report includes an overview of the demographic characteristics of podiatrists, such as their age/sex profile, and their work characteristics, such as clinical specialty, work setting and hours worked. The report then provides a profile of employed podiatrists in each surveyed state.

Nursing and midwifery labour force, South Australia, 2004

Concerns about the current and future capacity of the nursing workforce have led to a number of national reviews, including the National Review of Nursing Education (DEST 2002) and the Senate Community Affairs Committee Inquiry into Nursing (SCAC 2002). Data show an overall increase in nurse numbers over the decade to 2003 (AIHW 2003) but, despite this, the pattern of increase in part-time work, combined with population growth, had the net effect of reducing nursing supply per head of population. Over that decade, South Australia has seen its nursing supply levels shift from being well above the national rate to almost the same, before rising again. Although the South Australian nursing supply declined at a quicker rate than nationally, data show it has also recovered sooner, experiencing its lowest point in 1999, while the lowest point for national supply occurred in 2001. Nursing supply in South Australia continued to grow more quickly than national supply and was again well above the national rate by 2003.

Dental prosthetist labour force in Australia 2003

This report provides information on the dental prosthetist labour force in Australia based on data from the 2003 national dental labour force collection.

Information relating to the community services workforce

This report is intended to assist in defining the strategic directions that should be explored to support the development of national information about the community services workforce.

Dental hygienist labour force in Australia, 2003

This report provides information on the dental hygienist labour force in Australia based on the 2003 national dental labour force collection.

The South Australian dental labour force

The aims of the South Australian Dental Labour Force Project were to inform policy on the dental labour force through the provision of detailed estimates and projections on the supply of and demand for dental services in South Australia. This publication identifies trends in supply and demand, presents an overview of the aggregate shortage of the dental labour force and considers policy directions to address the supply-demand gap.

Medical labour force 2003

This report presents demographic and labour force statistics on the medical profession in Australia. It is based on the main findings of the 2003 national survey of registered medical practitioners. Information presented in the report includes the number of registered practitioners in each geographic region and in each state and territory, their age and sex profiles, areas of practice, medical specialties and hours worked. The report also includes comparisons over time using data from the 2000, 2001 and 2002 national surveys of registered medical practitioners.

Nursing and midwifery labour force 2003

This report presents statistics on trends in the employment of nurses and midwives in Australia. It is based on the main findings of the 2003 national survey of nursing and midwifery. Information presented in the report includes a national overview of the number and characteristics of nurses, their geographic region and the overall supply of nurses. Also included is a profile for each state and territory showing information such as nurses' age and sex profiles, type of nurse, area of clinical nursing, work setting and hours worked.

Pages: First Previous Page 1 of 4 Next Last