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Medical workforce 2012

The supply of employed medical practitioners in Australia increased from 323.2 to 355.6 full-time equivalent practitioners per 100,000 population between 2008 and 2012, which reflected a 16.4% rise in employed practitioner numbers. Women made up 37.9% of practitioners in 2012 compared with 34.9% in 2008.

Dental workforce 2012

The number of dental practitioners registered in Australia in 2012 was 19,462, of whom 14,687 (75.5%) were dentists. The supply of employed dentists increased slightly from 55.4 to 56.9 full-time equivalent practitioners per 100,000 population between 2011 and 2012, which reflected a 5.3% increase in dentists.The gender balance continued to shift, with women making up 36.5% of dentists in 2012 compared with 35.2% in 2011. The average hours worked each week by dentists decreased slightly from 37.3 to 37.0; and those working part time increased from 30.8% to 31.7%.

Nursing and midwifery workforce 2012

This report outlines the workforce characteristics of nurses and midwives in 2012. Between 2008 and 2012, the number of nurses and midwives employed in nursing or midwifery increased by 7.5%, from 269,909 to 290,144. During this period, nursing and midwifery supply increased by 0.5%, from 1,117.8 to 1,123.6 full-time equivalent nurses and midwives per 100,000 population. In 2012, the proportion of employed nurses and midwives aged 50 or older was 39.1%, an increase from 35.1% in 2008.

Allied health workforce 2012

This report outlines the workforce characteristics of 11 allied health practitioners for 2011 and 2012. In 2012, more than 4 in 5 registered practitioners were actively employed in their profession (from 76.2% for psychologists to 92.3% for podiatrists). For most professions there were more women than men employed. The average working week for employed practitioners ranged from 31.8 hours for Chinese medicine practitioners to 40.5 hours for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health practitioners.

Dental workforce 2011

The number of dental practitioners registered in Australia in 2011 was 18,803, of whom 14,179 were dentists. The supply of employed dentists increased from 50.9 to 56.1 full-time equivalent practitioners per 100,000 population between 2006 and 2011, which reflected a 22.4% increase in dentists. The gender balance continued to shift, with women making up 35.6% of dentists in 2011 compared with 29.0% in 2006. The average hours worked each week by dentists decreased slightly from 38.5 to 37.4.

Medical workforce 2011

The supply of employed medical practitioners in Australia increased from 344.6 to 381.4 full-time equivalent practitioners per 100,000 population between 2007 and 2011, which reflected a 10.7% rise in practitioner numbers. The gender balance continued to shift, with women making up 37.6% of practitioners in 2011 compared with 34% in 2007.  Specialists-in-training in the public sector worked the most average hours per week (47.6) while general practitioners in the public sector worked the least (20.5).

Nursing and midwifery workforce 2011

Between 2007 and 2011, the number of nurses and midwives employed in nursing increased by 7.7% from 263,331 to 283,577.    Over this period, the supply of nurses and midwives decreased  by 1.3% from 1,095.1 to 1,081.1 full-time equivalent positions per 100,000 population. The average age of the workforce increased from 43.7 to 44.5, and the proportion of nurses and midwives aged 50 or older increased from 33.0% to 38.6%.

Medical workforce 2010

The supply of employed medical practitioners increased between 2006 and 2010, from 346 to 366 full-time equivalent practitioners per 100,000 population. The increase reflected a 13% rise in practitioner numbers. The gender balance continued to shift, with women making up 37% of practitioners in 2010 compared to 34% in 2006. The average hours worked each week by medical practitioners declined slightly from 43.5 to 43.3 hours. The group with the longest average hours worked per week was Specialists-in-training at 49.9 hours, while General practitioners averaged 39.2 hours a week.

Medical labour force 2009

The supply of employed medical practitioners increased between 2005 and 2009, from 323 to 350 full-time equivalent practitioners per 100,000 population, based on a 40-hour week. The increase reflected a 20.7% rise in practitioner numbers. The gender balance continued to shift, with women making up 36% of practitioners in 2009 compared to 33% in 2005. The average hours worked by medical practitioners declined from 43.7 to 42.2 hours.

Nursing and midwifery labour force 2009

The supply of nurses increased by 6.2% between 2005 and 2009, from 1,040 full time equivalent (FTE) nurses per 100,000 population to 1,105 FTE nurses based on a 38-hour week. This was mainly a result of both a 13.3% increase in the number of employed nurses, and a 0.9% increase in the average hours they worked over this period. Nursing continued to be a female dominated profession, with females comprising 90.4% of employed nurses in 2009 (down slightly from 92.1% in 2005).

Oral health practitioners in Australia, 2006

In 2006, there were 1,171 dental therapists, 674 dental hygienists and 371 oral health therapists practising in Australia. The oral health practitioner workforce was overwhelmingly female, with 98.8% of dental therapists, 96.7% of hygienists and 94.8% of oral health therapists being female. Dental therapists were the oldest group among the oral health labour force, with an average age of 42.9 years.

Oral health practitioners labour force projection 2006-2025

Between 2006 and 2025 the number of oral health therapists practising in Australia is expected to increase from 371 to 2,117. Dental hygienist numbers are also expected to increase (from 674 to 1,458), while dental therapist numbers are projected to decrease (from 1,171 to 443). Overall, the number of oral health practitioners per 100,000 population is expected to increase from 10.8 to 16.2 by 2025.

Dentists, specialists and allied practitioners in Australia: Dental Labour Force Collection, 2006

The supply of dentists (including dental specialists) grew from 46.6 to 50.3 full-time equivalent practising dentists per 100,000 population between 2000 and 2006. In 2006 there were an estimated10,400 practising dentists in Australia, of whom 1,300 were dental specialists. There were an additional 3,100 allied dental practitioners comprising of dental hygienists, dental therapists, and oral health therapists, nearly all of whom were women. Almost 90% of the estimated 900 practising dental prosthetists in 2006 were men.

The coding workforce shortfall

Concern about the shortfall in the clinical coding workforce in Australia has been raised in a number of national fora. This report quantifies the scope of the existing shortfall, provides some projections of future numbers required to cover increasing demands, and provides a consolidated set of recommendations to address the issues identified.

Medical labour force 2008

The supply of employed medical practitioners increased between 2004 and 2008, from 283 to 304 full-time equivalent practitioners per 100,000 population. The increase reflected a 20.5% rise in practitioner numbers.The gender balance continued to shift, with women making up 35% of practitioners in 2008 compared to 33% in 2004. The average hours worked by male practitioners declined from 47.1 to 45.4 hours, while hours worked by female practitioners changed marginally from 37.6 to 37.7 hours.

Nursing and midwifery labour force 2008

In 2008 the total number of registered and enrolled nurses estimated by the Nursing and Midwifery Labour Force Survey was 312,736, an increase of 10.6% since 2004. The nursing workforce continued to age between 1997 and 2008; the proportion of nurses aged 50 years or over increased from 18.9% to 34.4%.The number of full time equivalent nurses per 100,000 population increased by 15.2% between 2004 and 2008, and the profession continued to be predominantly female, with females comprising 91% of employed nurses in 2008.

Medical labour force 2007

The supply of employed medical practitioners increased between 2003 and 2007, from 279 to 305 full-time equivalent practitioners per 100,000 population. This increase reflected a 20% rise in practitioner numbers. The gender balance continued to shift, with women making up 34% of practitioners in 2007 compared to 32% in 2003. The average hours worked by male practitioners declined from 47.5 to 45.9 hours, while hours worked by female practitioners remained steady at 37.6 hours.

Nursing and midwifery labour force 2007

In 2007, the total number of registered and enrolled nurses estimated by the Nursing and Midwifery Labour Force Survey was 305,834, an increase of 12% since 2003. The nursing workforce continued to age between 2003 and 2007; the proportion of nurses aged 50 years or over increased from 28% to 33%. The number of full time equivalent nurses per 100,000 population increased by 8% since 2003, and the profession continued to be predominantly female, with females comprising 90% of employed nurses in 2007.

Eye health labour force in Australia

The delivery of eye health care in Australia is undertaken by an eye health labour force that consists of ophthalmologists, ophthalmic nurses, optometrists, orthoptists, optical dispensers and optical mechanics. The number of full-time equivalent ophthalmologists, optometrists and orthoptists increased by 15%, 11% and 20% respectively between 2001 and 2006. Ophthalmologists are on average older than other eye health workers. In 2006 the average age of ophthalmologists was 52 years. The average age of the other eye health occupations ranged from 36 years (orthoptists) to 46 years (ophthalmic nurses).

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health labour force statistics and data quality assessment

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health labour force statistics and data quality assessment provides comprehensive data on the Indigenous health labour force. Data are drawn from censuses, surveys and administrative data sources. The report presents information on Indigenous medical practitioners, nurses, Aboriginal health workers and those studying health. The report also assesses the quality of Indigenous labour force data. It provides a useful resource for policy makers, administrators and researchers interested in the Indigenous labour force.

Health and community services labour force 2006

In 2006, over 9% of Australia's workforce was employed in health and community services occupations - a 26% increase from 2001. Between 2001 and 2006 the health workforce and community services workforce increased by 22.8% and 35.6% respectively. Over the same period, the health and community services workforce aged with the proportion of workers in the 55 to 64 years age bracket increasing by 4 percentage points. This report also contains information on geographical distribution, country of birth and qualifications held.

Medical labour force 2006

This report presents demographic and labour force statistics on the medical profession in Australia and trends in the number of employed doctors. It is based on the main findings of the 2006 national survey of registered medical practitioners. Information presented includes a national and state/territory overview of the number of medical practitioners (including age and sex, field of medicine, working hours and where they work), their geographic region and overall supply.

Dental prosthetist labour force in Australia, 2005

This report provides information on the dental prosthetist labour force in Australia based on the 2005 national dental labour force collection. Where appropriate, comparisons have been made with data from the most recent previous collection (2003).

Dental labour force in Australia, 2005

This report provides information on the dentist labour force in Australia based on the 2005 national dental labour force collection. Where appropriate, comparisons have been made with data drawn from the most recent collection (2003).

Dental hygienist labour force in Australia, 2005

This report provides information on the dental hygienist labour force in Australia based on  the  2005  national dental labour force survey. Where appropriate, comparisons have been made with data from the most recent previous collection (2003).

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