• Print

Youth justice orders and supervision periods: 2012-13

This fact sheet summarises information on the number of supervised orders administered by state and territory youth justice agencies, and the periods of supervision experienced by young people in 2012-13. To some extent, differences between states and territories in the numbers and types of legal orders can reflect differences in legislation and legal and administrative practices.

Time under youth justice supervision: 2012-13

This fact sheet is about how long young people spent under youth justice supervision in 2012–13.

Long-term trends in youth justice supervision: 2012-13

This fact sheet summarises the long-term trends in rates of young people under supervision. It includes 7-year national trends and up to 13-year trends for individual states and territories.

Types of community-based supervision: 2012-13

This fact sheet outlines the types of community-based supervision that young people experienced in 2012-13.Young people may be supervised in the community under one or more types of orders, including:unsentenced orders-such as supervised or conditional bail (while awaiting the outcome of a court matter or sentencing)sentenced orders-such as probation and similar orders, suspended detention, and parole or supervised release (after being proven guilty in a court).Young people may be supervised under multiple orders of different types at the same time, and community-based orders may be interrupted by time spent in detention.

Unsentenced detention: 2012-13

This fact sheet summarises information about young people in unsentenced detention during 2012-13.Young people may be in unsentenced detention when they have been charged with an offence and are awaiting the outcome of their court matter, or when they have been found or pleaded guilty and are awaiting sentencing. They may also be sentenced to a period of detention if proven guilty in a court.Young people may be referred to unsentenced detention by either police (pre-court) or a court (known as remand). Police-referred pre-court detention is not available in all states and territories, and most young people in unsentenced detention are on remand.

Sentenced detention: 2012-13

This fact sheet provides information about young people in sentenced detention in 2012-13.Young people may be sentenced to a period of detention if proven guilty in a court. This includes young people who have received orders, such as control orders, revocation of parole and youth residential orders. They may also be in detention when they are unsentenced—that is, when they have been charged with an offence and are awaiting the outcome of their court matter, or when they have been found or pleaded guilty and are awaiting sentencing.

Detention entries and exits: 2012-13

This fact sheet provides information about the numbers of young people under youth justice supervision who were either received into, and/or released from, detention in 2012-13. A reception is when a young person enters detention having not been detained immediately before. Conversely, a release is when a young person leaves detention and is not detained immediately after.

Remoteness area and socioeconomic status: 2012-13

This fact sheet provides information about the remoteness area and socioeconomic status of young people under supervision during 2012-13, based on their last known address.

First entry to supervision: 2012-13

This fact sheet provides information about the first entry to youth justice supervision among young people who were supervised during 2012-13.

Youth justice supervision history: 2012-13

This fact sheet explores the supervision history of the young people who were under youth justice supervision during 2012-13.

Comparisons between the youth and adult justice systems: 2012–13

This fact sheet summarises some of the key similarities and differences between young people and adults in the justice systems in Australia.In all states and territories, young people aged 10 and over can be charged with a criminal offence. Separate justice systems exist for young people and adults, each with specific legislation. In most cases, the upper age limit in the youth justice system is 17 at the time of the offence (16 in Queensland). Some young people aged 18 and over are under youth justice supervision; reasons for this include their age at the time of the offence, continuation of their supervision once they turn 18, and their vulnerability or immaturity.

Comparisons between Australian and international youth justice systems: 2012–13

This fact sheet examines Australian and international approaches to youth justice.

Pathways through youth justice supervision

Pathways through youth justice supervision explores the types of youth justice supervision experienced by particular cohorts of young people based on data available from the Juvenile Justice National Minimum Data Set (JJ NMDS) from 2000–01 to 2012–13. The report found that the top 10 pathways accounted for nearly three quarters (71%) of young people who experienced supervision. It also found that young males, young Indigenous people, those aged 10–14 at first supervision and those experiencing sentenced detention at some point were more likely than their counterparts to have more complex and varied pathways through supervision.

Youth justice in Australia 2012-13

Around 6,300 young people were under youth justice supervision in Australia on an average day in 2012-13, due to their involvement, or alleged involvement, in crime. Of these, over 4 in 5 (5,300 young people) were supervised in the community and the remaining 1,000 were in detention. Young people spent, on average, 26 weeks under supervision during the year.

Australian Capital Territory: youth justice supervision in 2012–13

This fact sheet focuses on youth justice supervision in the Australian Capital Territory during 2012-13 and provides some comparisons to the national context. This is one of a series of fact sheets on youth justice supervision in 2012-13.

New South Wales: youth justice supervision in 2012–13

This fact sheet focuses on youth justice supervision in New South Wales during 2012-13 and provides some comparisons to the national context. This is one of a series of fact sheets on youth justice supervision in 2012-13.

Queensland: youth justice supervision in 2012–13

This fact sheet focuses on youth justice supervision in Queensland during 2012-13 and provides some comparisons to the national context. This is one of a series of fact sheets on youth justice supervision in 2012-13.

South Australia: overview of youth justice supervision in 2012–13

This fact sheet focuses on youth justice supervision in South Australia during 2012-13 and provides some comparisons to the national context. This is one of a series of fact sheets on youth justice supervision in 2012-13.

Tasmania: youth justice supervision in 2012–13

This fact sheet focuses on youth justice supervision in Tasmania during 2012-13 and provides some comparisons to the national context. This is one of a series of fact sheets on youth justice supervision in 2012-13.

Victoria: youth justice supervision in 2012–13

This fact sheet focuses on youth justice supervision in Victoria during 2012-13 and provides some comparisons to the national context. This is one of a series of fact sheets on youth justice supervision in 2012-13.

Mapping of children and youth indicator reporting frameworks

This report provides an overview of the purpose, scope and reporting status of 6 national frameworks, 4 National Agreements and 5 National Partnership Agreements that are relevant to children and/or youth. Indicators from the frameworks and Agreements are mapped across 6 broad domains to identify critical indicators of shared relevance, and those that are unique to a particular framework or Agreement. Recommendations are provided on how reporting on Australian children and youth could be streamlined to ensure a sustainable approach to data development, data collection and reporting.

Type 2 diabetes in Australia's children and young people: a working paper

Type 2 diabetes in Australia's children and young people identifies and describes national data sources to monitor incidence and prevalence of type 2 diabetes in children and young people and assesses their suitability for this task. This working paper also presents, for the first time, national incidence and prevalence estimates of type 2 diabetes in Australia's children and young people.

Youth detention population in Australia 2013

This report presents information on the youth detention population in Australia, focusing on quarterly trends from June 2009 to June 2013. On an average night, there were about 1,000 young people in detention, about half of whom were unsentenced. Numbers and rates of young people in detention remained relatively stable over the 4 years nationally; however, this trend varied between different states and territories. Around half of all young people in detention on an average night were Indigenous.

Using the Juvenile Justice National Minimum Data Set to measure juvenile recidivism

This report reviewed results and recommendations of a project exploring youth recidivism, including to determining whether youth recidivism could be analysed using data from the Juvenile Justice National Minimum Data Set (JJ NMDS). There are substantial benefits in using a longitudinal data collection such as the JJ NMDS, but also some limitations. Preliminary data analysed showed that nationally, over two-fifths (43%) of young people with sentenced supervision in 2010-11 had returned to sentenced supervision within 1 year, while over three-fifths (63%) of those with sentenced supervision in 2009-10 had returned to sentenced supervision within 2 years.

The health of Australia's males: from birth to young adulthood (0-24 years)

This report is the third in a series on the health of Australia's males, and focuses on health conditions and risk factors that are age-specific (such as congenital anomalies) and those where large sex differences are observed (such as injury).Findings include:- Male babies born in 2009-2011 can expect to live to the age of 79.7, nearly 5 years less than female babies born the same year (84.2).- While males aged 0-24 are more likely to be hospitalised or die from injury than females of the same age, they are similarly likely to be overweight or obese and less likely to smoke tobacco daily.

Young people aged 10-14 in the youth justice system 2011-12

Despite being a relatively small group, research indicates that young people aged 10-14 in the youth justice system are at risk of becoming chronic, long-term offenders. Data show that most (85%) young people born in 1993-94 who were supervised at age 10-14 returned to (or continued under) supervision when they were 15-17. They were more likely than those first supervised at older ages to experience all types of supervision when 15-17, and spent more time in total under supervision.

Child and teenager oral health and dental visiting: results from the National Dental Telephone Interview Survey 2010

This publication describes the self-reported oral health and dental visiting patterns of Australian children and teenagers in 2010 as well as trends between 1994 and 2010.While the majority of children and teenagers reported good oral health and had made a dental visit in the previous 12 months, almost 30% experienced at least one financial barrier or burden associated with dental care. Lower rates of dental visiting and greater experience of poor oral health,  financial barriers or hardship, and barriers to dental care were all more evident among those from lower income households than those from higher income households.

Youth justice orders and supervision periods: 2011-12

In 2011-12, the 11,370 young people under youth justice supervision were supervised under a total of 57,470 community-based and detention orders. They experienced 14,598 periods of supervision, or about 1.3 periods per person, on average. This is one of a series of fact sheets on youth justice supervision in 2011-12.

Time under youth justice supervision: 2011-12

The median length of youth justice supervision periods completed in 2011-12 was about 11 weeks. When all periods are considered, young people spent an average of about 26 weeks, or 6 months, under youth justice supervision during the year. This is one of a series of fact sheets on youth justice supervision in 2011-12.

Long-term trends in youth justice supervision: 2011-12

Over the 6 years from 2006-07 to 2011-12, rates of young people aged 10-17 under youth justice supervision on an average day increased from 23 to 26 young people per 10,000. However, trends varied among the states and territories. This is one of a series of fact sheets on youth justice supervision in 2011-12.

Types of community-based supervision: 2011-12

On an average day in 2011-12, most (79%) young people under community-based youth justice supervision were serving a probation order, or an order similar to probation. About 14% were serving unsentenced orders. This is one of a series of fact sheets on youth justice supervision in 2011-12.

Unsentenced detention: 2011–12

Just over half (54%) of young people in detention on an average day in 2011-12 were unsentenced-that is, awaiting the outcome of their court matter or sentencing. The median duration of completed periods of unsentenced detention was 4 days. This is one of a series of fact sheets on youth justice supervision in 2011-12.

Sentenced detention: 2011–12

Nationally, half (50%) of all young people in detention on an average day in 2011-12 were serving a sentence. The median length of completed periods of sentenced detention was about 8 weeks. This is one of a series of fact sheets on youth justice supervision in 2011-12.

Detention entries and exits: 2011–12

There were 7,478 receptions (entries) to detention in 2011-12 and 7,626 releases (exits). Most receptions (94%) and releases (84%) were for unsentenced detention. This is one of a series of fact sheets on youth justice supervision in 2011-12.

The dental health of Australia's children by remoteness: Child Dental Health Survey Australia 2009

This publication describes the dental health of Australian children examined by school dental service staff in 2009 and provides insights into the dental health of rural children. Dental decay was relatively common, with around half of children examined having a history of decay. Children in Regional and Remote areas were at increased risk of dental decay in their baby teeth compared with those in Major cities.

Youth justice in Australia 2011-12: an overview

The overview presents figures on the number of young people  that were under juvenile justice supervision in 2011-12. The overview provides a breakdown on the number of young people who were supervised in the community and those in detention it also provides Indigenous rates.

Demonstration projects for improving sexual health in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth: evaluation report

The Office for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health funded six demonstration projects aimed at improving the sexual health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people over 3 years.  An evaluation of the projects by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare and identified that successful sexual health programs consulted a broad range of stakeholders; engaged and developed partnerships with the community, organisations and services; were culturally appropriate and flexible in their design, delivery and implementation; and had staff who were respected by the community.

A snapshot of juvenile arthritis

This snapshot brings together the latest information on juvenile arthritis, a relatively uncommon condition affecting less than 1% of Australian children. Limited national statistics make it difficult to evaluate the full extent of the effects of this condition on the children and those who care for them. However, available data show that Australian Government subsidies for new classes of treatment medications have continually increased since their introduction in 2002-03 and hospitalisation rates for girls with juvenile arthritis have increased in the 10 years to 2009-10. The reasons for this latter increase are not yet clear.

Juvenile detention population in Australia 2012

This report presents information on the juvenile detention population in Australia, focusing on quarterly trends from June 2008 to June 2012. On an average night, there were about 1,000 young people in detention, about half of whom were unsentenced. Numbers and rates of young people in detention remained relatively stable over the 4 years; however, the level of Indigenous over-representation increased, particularly in unsentenced detention.

Diabetes among young Australians

Diabetes among young Australians is the first report from the National Centre for Monitoring Diabetes to examine the management and impact of diabetes in youth in Australia. Diabetes affects a considerable number of young people: in 2010, about 31,300 Australians aged 0-30 years with diabetes were registered with the National Diabetes Service Scheme. Most (79%) had Type 1 diabetes. This report explores how young Australians with diabetes are managing their condition, their use of health services and the diabetes-related health problems they experience.

Indigenous young people in the juvenile justice system

Although only about 5% of young Australians are Indigenous, almost 2 in 5 (39%) of those under juvenile justice supervision on an average day in 2010-11 were Indigenous. There were 2,820 Indigenous young people under supervision on an average day and 5,195 during the year. Indigenous young people first entered supervision at younger ages than non-Indigenous young people, on average, and spent longer under supervision during the year.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander identification in community services data collections: an updated data quality report

This report examines the identification of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander clients in a number of Australian Institute of Health and Welfare community services data collections, by analysing where Indigenous status is missing/not stated. It makes a number of recommendations, including that data collection manuals and training materials reflect the National best practice guidelines for collecting Indigenous status in health data sets. Where necessary, jurisdictions should consider modifying client forms and client information management systems to ensure consistency with these guidelines.

Girls and young women in the juvenile justice system

In 2010-11, there were 1,190 young women under juvenile justice supervision in Australia on an average day and 2,620 during the year. Most (93%) young women were supervised in the community, with the remainder in detention. Young women spent around 2 weeks less than young men under supervision, on average, during 2010-11 (171 days compared with 186), which was mainly due to less time spent in detention (31 days compared with 68). Young women were much less likely than their male counterparts to be involved in all elements of the juvenile justice system.

Juvenile justice in Australia 2010-11: an overview

This bulletin provides an overview of the report Juvenile justice in Australia: 2010-11, which focuses on young people who were supervised by the government departments responsible for juvenile justice during 2010-11, both in the community and in detention. On an average day in 2010-11, there were an estimated 7,265 young people under juvenile justice supervision in Australia.

Juvenile justice in Australia: 2010-11

On an average day in 2010-11, 2.6 young people aged 10-17 were under juvenile justice supervision for every 1,000 in Australia. Most young people (86%) were supervised in the community, with the remainder in detention. Indigenous young people aged 10-17 were 15 times as likely as non-Indigenous young people to be under supervision on an average day: 14 times as likely to be under community-based supervision and 24 times as likely to be in detention.

Younger people with disability in residential aged care: 2010-11

This bulletin presents data on the Younger People with Disability in Residential Aged Care (YPIRAC) initiative, which aims to reduce the number of people with disability aged under 65 who live in residential aged care. Between 2005-06 and 2010-11, an estimated 1,432 people have been helped, including 250 who have been moved out of residential aged care and into accommodation that better suits their situation, 244 who were successfully diverted away from entering residential aged care, and 456 who were provided with enhanced services while in residential aged care.

Cancer in adolescents and young adults in Australia

'Cancer in adolescents and young adults in Australia' presents the latest available incidence, survival and mortality statistics on cancer in young Australians aged 15 to 29. The incidence of cancer in this age group has become steady since the mid-1990s while cancer mortality has fallen between 1983 and 2007. Survival from cancer in adolescents and young adults has been relatively high and has improved with time, although cancer outcomes vary across population groups.

Young Australians: their health and wellbeing 2011

This report is the fourth in a series of national statistical reports on young people aged 12-24 years, produced by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare. It provides the latest available information on how Australia's young people are faring according to a set of national indicators of health and wellbeing. Death rates have fallen considerably among young people, mainly due to declines in injury deaths. Most young people are achieving national minimum standards for reading, writing and numeracy, are fully engaged in study or work, and have strong support networks. There are some favourable trends in risk and protective factors, such as declines in smoking and illicit substance use. But it is not all good news. There is a high rate of mental disorders among young people, and road transport accidents, although continuing to decline, are still a major cause of death among young males. Too many young people are overweight or obese, are not doing sufficient physical activity or eating enough fruit and vegetables, and are drinking alcohol at risky levels. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people are far more likely to be disadvantaged across a broad range of indicators.

Juvenile justice in Australia 2008-09

In Australia, around 7,200 young people were under juvenile justice supervision on any given day in 2008-09. Most (90%) were under community-based supervision, with the remainder in detention. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people continue to be over-represented, particularly in detention. This report presents information on the young people under community-based supervision and in detention and the type and length of their supervision. For the first time, detailed information on all community-based orders supervised by juvenile justice agencies is presented, as well as new analyses on the remoteness and socioeconomic status of young people's usual residence.

Juvenile justice in Australia 2008-09: Interim report - main tables

In Australia, around 7,200 young people were under juvenile justice supervision on any given day in 2008–09; almost 90% were under community-based supervision, with the remainder in detention. This interim report contains the main tables from the forthcoming Juvenile justice in Australia 2008–09 (full report).

Young people and children in social housing

This bulletin presents information about the young population assisted by social housing and crisis accommodation. It describes the households in which children and young people reside in social housing and discusses the pattern of assistance through social housing both as dependants and as primary tenants.

Trends in access to dental care among Australian teenagers

The trends in dental care among Australian teenagers from 1994-2008 are investigated in this report, drawn from the National Dental Telephone Interview Survey (NDTIS) conducted in 1994, 1996, 1999, 2002, 2005 and 2008. It compares the services received by those eligible for public dentistry and those who are not.

Health and wellbeing of young Australians: technical paper on operational definitions and data issues for key national indicators

This technical paper specifies the operational definitions and primary data sources for the key national indicators of young people's health and wellbeing. It identifies the best currently available data sources for the key national indicators as identified by the AIHW, in conjunction with the National Youth Information Advisory Group. It comments on data gaps and limitations, particularly inconsistencies between indicator (ideal) definitions and existing data definitions.

Health and wellbeing of young Australians: indicator framework and key national indicators

This bulletin previews the reporting framework and key national indicators that will be the basis of the report Young Australians: their health and wellbeing 2011, scheduled for release in 2011. The bulletin presents 71 key national indicators, along with brief justifications explaining the relevance and importance of the indicators to young people's health and wellbeing. The indicators cover a broad range of areas of young people's health and wellbeing, including: morbidity, disability, mortality, health risk and protective factors, community, socioeconomic and environmental factors and measures of system performance.

Dental health of Australia's teenagers and pre-teen children: the Child Dental Health Survey, Australia 2003-04

Teenage children have been identified as being at increased risk of dental disease, and among pre-teen children nearly half of all 6 year olds had a history of decay in their baby teeth. The Child Dental Health Survey provides national information on the dental health of children attending school dental services in Australia, and shows decay experience is relatively common in both teenage and pre-teen Australian children.

Juvenile justice in Australia 2007-08

Each day, around 6,000 young people are under juvenile justice supervision in Australia. This report is the fifth in the series on young people under juvenile justice supervision. It shows that the number of young people in detention on an average day increased by 17% over four years from 2004-05 and that over half of those in detention on average day in 2007-08 were Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islanders. The report contains information on the characteristics of young people under community-based supervision and in detention as well the type and length of their supervision.

Juvenile arthritis in Australia

Juvenile arthritis is one of the common chronic diseases affecting Australian children. The disease contributes significantly to ill health, affecting growth and skeletal maturity of children. The life course of the disease entails a variety of complications, activity limitations and need for regular support and care. This report brings together the latest data to highlight the impact of juvenile arthritis in Australia. It includes information on the prevalence, associated disability and management of the disease. The information should be useful to the broader community, policy makers and anyone with an interest in the health of children.

Making progress: the health, development and wellbeing of Australia's children and young people

Ensuring that children get the best possible start in life is a key priority for the Australian Government. This report delivers the latest and most reliable information on how, as a nation, we are faring according to key statistical indicators of child and youth health, development and wellbeing. The report covers children and young people aged 0-19 years, and includes indicators for the entire 0-19 year age range as well as indicators for three different stages of development: 1) infancy and early childhood; 2) school age childhood; and 3) adolescence. Information is presented on important issues such as mental health, disability, risk factors for chronic disease, mortality, education, homelessness, crime, jobless families and family economic situation. Particular attention is given to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and youth, and to how Australia compares internationally. This is an essential resource for policy makers, researchers, practitioners and anyone interested in the progress of Australia's children and youth.

Juvenile justice in Australia 2006-07

Juvenile justice in Australia 2006-07 is the fourth report on young people in juvenile justice supervision in Australia. It includes information on the characteristics of young people in community-based supervision and detention in 2006-07 and the type and length of supervision they experience, as well as patterns of supervision over time and analyses of trends. The report provides data from the Juvenile Justice National Minimum Data Set (JJ NMDS), which is based on the experience of the young person within supervision rather than on legal orders and contains data from 2000-01. The JJ NMDS was developed by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare and the Australasian Juvenile Justice Administrators.

Hospitalised farm injury among children and young people, Australia 2000-01 to 2004-05

Over the five-year period 2000-01 to 2004-05, a total of at least 3,926 children and young people were hospitalised as the result of injuries sustained on farms. This briefing focuses on these cases.

Linking SAAP, child protection and juvenile justice data collections: a feasibility study

Linking the SAAP, child protection and juvenile justice data collections would provide valuable information about the characteristics of people who are involved in one or more of these sectors. This information would support policies and programs aimed at implementing, monitoring and evaluating targeted intervention strategies. In this report, the feasibility of linking these three data collections is investigated. The authors conclude that linkage is technically feasible and that both the SAAP and juvenile justice data collections have data currently suitable for linkage. Linkage with the child protection data collection would be dependent on the successful implementation of the planned national minimum data set.

Injury among young Australians

'Injury among young Australians' provides comprehensive information on injury incidence, hospitalisations and deaths among young people in Australia. It presents the most up-to-date available data, as well as trend data, on major causes of injury for this population group, including transport accidents, intentional self-harm and suicide, assault and accidental poisoning. Information is presented for these and other causes by age and sex, Indigenous status, remoteness of residence and socioeconomic status, in order to provide a comprehensive overview of injury among young Australians. This bulletin will be relevant to anyone interested in gaining an insight into the patterns of morbidity and mortality among young people due to injury.

Juvenile justice in Australia 2005-06

Juvenile justice in Australia 2005-06 provides data from the Juvenile Justice National Minimum Data Set (NMDS) developed by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) and the Australasian Juvenile Justice Administrators (AJJA). The Juvenile Justice NMDS includes information on all young people in juvenile justice supervision in Australia, both in the community and in detention. It is based on the experience of the young person within supervision, while making it somewhat different to other criminal justice collections that focus on legal orders. This is the third report on the collection and presents data for 2005-06, as well as analyses of trends in community-based supervision and detention over the six years since 2000-01 when the collection began. It includes data on the characteristics of the young people under supervision such as age, sex and Indigenous status, and their patterns of supervision over time.

Young Australians: their health and wellbeing 2007

'Young Australians: their health and wellbeing 2007' is the third national statistical report on young people in Australia. Using a set of key indicators of health and wellbeing of young people, this report brings together the most up-to-date national data on the health status of young Australians aged 12-24 years and the factors influencing their health.  Information on health status includes self-assessed health status, disability, injury, mental health, chronic disease, communicable diseases, hospitalisations and mortality. Factors influencing health addressed in this report include family and community environments, environmental factors, socioeconomic factors including education, employment and income and health behaviours such as weight, physical activity, nutrition and substance use. This report also includes a special section on the health and welfare of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people. Timely, comprehensive and accurate information on these factors will enable the formulation of appropriate and effective policies and interventions to achieve long term health and wellbeing for young people.

The Child Dental Health Survey Western Australia 2002

Information listed in the tables of this report includes: the age and sex of children in the sample, their deciduous and permanent caries experience, frequency of fissure sealants, history of school dental service examinations, and regional statistics.The report also provides selected trends, highlighting differences between the years 1998 and 2002. However, no formal hypothesis  tests have been undertaken and descriptions of differences between years are intended as a guide to the reader rather than as a formal statistical evaluation.

Juvenile justice in Australia 2004-05

Juvenile justice in Australia 2004-05 provides data from the Juvenile Justice national minimum data set (NMDS), developed by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) and the Australasian Juvenile Justice Administrators (AJJA). The Juvenile Justice NMDS includes information on all young people in juvenile justice supervision in Australia, both in the community and in detention. It is based on the experience of the young person within supervision, making it somewhat different to other criminal justice collections that focus on legal orders. This is the second report on the collection and presents data for 2004-05, as well as analyses of trends in community-based supervision and detention over the five years since 2000-01. It includes data on the characteristics of the young people under supervision such as age, sex and Indigenous status, and their patterns of supervision.

Young Australians: their health and wellbeing: key national indicators

This bulletin provides a preview of the reporting framework and key indicators that are the basis of the report Young Australians: their health and wellbeing, scheduled for release in 2007. The report is the sixth in a series of reports on the health of Australian children and young people published by the AIHW.

2004 National Drug Strategy Household Survey: detailed findings

This report extends the analysis presented in '2004 National Drug Strategy Household Survey: first results' by providing more detailed information on drug use prevalence, drug-related behaviours and incidents, and support for drug-related policy and legislation. The report features analysis relating to young people--reflecting the inclusion in the 2004 survey of 12-13-year-olds--and new material on mental and physical health, also included for the first time in 2004. This report, along with others in the Drug statistics series, will be a useful resource for policy-makers, planners and researchers interested in drug-related matters.

Occupational Safety Research in Australia

In this issue... Key occupational injury organisations; Role of design in serious work-related injury (NOHSC); Role of machinery design in farm injury among males; Contribution of coroners to designing for safety; Regulatory approach to minimising design-related occupational injury; Retrofitting of safe tractor access platforms; Influence of product design on risk perception and behaviour; Design issues and mining injuries; Engineering solutions to manual handling and fall hazards in plasterers; PhD students involved in occupational injury research; Safe tractor assessment rating system; Occupational injury websites; Product Safety Study; From the Coroner: all terrain vehicles and scuba diving; A picture of Australia’s children; Keeping kids safe on Western Australia’s roads; Dishwasher detergent injuries; Next world injury conference; Survey of Aboriginal children and young people; Injury seminars on the Internet; Stay on Your Feet WA; Draft swimming pool standards; Information sharing; Mexican ICE meeting.

Key national indicators of children's health, development and wellbeing

Monitoring the progress of Australia's children is central to the National Agenda for Early Childhood (Department of Family and Community Services, 2004). The AIHW has been monitoring the health, development and wellbeing of Australia's children since 1996 with funding from the Department of Health and Ageing. To date the Institute has produced four comprehensive national reports in this area - Australia's Children (published in 1998 and 2002) and Australia's Young People (published in 1999 and 2003). In keeping in line with a new emphasis on a whole of government cross-sectoral approach to childhood policy, the AIHW has broadened its reporting framework in this area to encompass a wider set on influences on childhood development. This work has been guided by an Advisory Committee comprising key experts and jurisdictional representatives, the Australian Government Taskforce on Child Development, and the Australian Council for Children and Parenting. This bulletin provides an overview of the key indicators to be published in A Picture of Australia's Children 2005, as part of a national program of indicator development, data collection and regular reporting.

Trends in access to dental care of South Australian young adults

This report provides information on the use of dental services of young adults in South Australia. This research was supported by the National Health and Medical Research Council, the Australian Dental Research Foundation and AIHW Dental Statistics and Research Unit.

Australia's young people 2003: Their health and wellbeing

This is the second national report on the health and wellbeing of young people in Australia. It provides comprehensive information on the health status of young people including causes of hospitalisations and deaths, chronic diseases, infectious diseases, injury, disability, reproductive and sexual health. The behavioural risk and protective factors influencing young people's health and wellbeing that are covered in this report include substance use, diet and nutrition, physical activity and overweight and obesity.Social conditions are also important determinants of health. The report therefore includes information on the family environment, relationships and social participation, education, employment and income.An overview of the health and welfare of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people is also presented.

Young homeless people 2001-02: New South Wales supplementary report: a report from the SAAP National Data Collection

This supplementary report to Young Homeless People in Australia 2001-02 provides data specifically for New South Wales. Both reports provide information on young people aged 12-24 years who are homeless or at imminent risk of becoming homeless.

Young homeless people in Australia 2001-02: a report from the SAAP National Data Collection

This report provides information on young people aged 12-24 years who are homeless or are at imminent risk of becoming homeless, and the assistance given to them by SAAP.

Alcohol and water safety

In this issue... Alcohol and water safety; Reflections on the Perth Conference; Injury in the Asia-Pacific Region; Conference photos; New ATSI Health Statistics Unit; New on the RCIS website; Injury in Bangladesh; World Health Day 2004; AIPN Report; Suicide risk factors in Bangalore, India; Suicide among young Samoans; Eye Safety Project, Bangladesh; New staff at RCIS; Childhood injury prevention in Vietnam; Suicide and risk-taking deaths of children and young people; SIPP Communique.

Income status of homeless people in SAAP 1999-2001

This is a special report by the Supported Accommodation Assistance Program (SAAP) National Data Collection Agency (NDCA) on the income status of clients assisted at SAAP agencies. The report utilises data from the SAAP ongoing Client Collection and the Income Issues Collection 5 May to 30 June 2000. The collection focuses of those SAAP clients with no source of income, the reasons some clients have no income, and also those clients receiving government income support payments before SAAP support. The income status of women escaping domestic violence, young people and migrant SAAP clients is a particular focus of this report. The report also presents background information on the wider Australian government income support system.

Access to dental services of Australian children and adolescents 1999

This research report provides information on the use of dental services by children and adolescents in Australia. Data were collected for the National Dental Telephone Interview Survey in 1994-96 and in 1999. Since the 1970s school dental services have provided dental care for large numbers of Australian children. Since 1994-96 variations to the provision of school dental services have occurred with the introduction of fees in some States.

Alcohol-related injury and young males

This report aims to describe what is known about the occurrence of alcohol-related injury (ARI) in young males; to outline current knowledge about reducing ARI in young males; to highlight important gaps in the data; and to indicate ways forward.

Australia's young people 1999: their health and wellbeing

Australia's Young People: Their Health and Wellbeing 1999 is the first national report on the health status of young people aged 12-24 years in Australia. It provides comprehensive information from currently available data sources, and is the second in a series of reports on child and youth health. This report includes information on important diseases and injuries, major risk factors and wider determinants of health. Separate sections are presented on the health status of particular priority groups: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth, young people living in rural and remote locations, young people born overseas and those from socioeconomically disadvantaged groups. This report will be relevant to anyone interested in youth health, including health planners and administrators, community and hospital practitioners, academic researchers, and the general public.

Juvenile justice and youth welfare: a scoping study

Provides information on key elements of juvenile justice and relevant aspects of welfare programs in Australia. The report identifies issues in the relationship between juvenile justice and youth welfare and summarises the services provided in this area by government agencies. It also describes the main juvenile justice data collections. The report will be particularly useful to juvenile justice policy makers, service providers, planners and research workers in this field.

Health differentials among young Australian adults

This report is an important reference that gives information on broad health indicators covering mortality, handicap, disability, perceived health status, illness and accident rates and health service use and on specific health problems such as suicide, motor vehicle traffic accidents, drug dependence, cancers, epilepsy, deafness, smoking and risk drinking.Health differentials among young Australian adults is the fourth and last report in the Health Monitoring Series that systematically documents health differentials in Australia using national population health and mortality data relating to the late 1980s. This report shows that there are clear differentials in the health of young Australians aged 15-24 years according to socioeconomic status, whether the measures of disadvantage are based on family income, education, employment status, or socioeconomic disadvantage of area.

Injury among 15 to 19 year old males

Details injuries among 15 to 19 year old Australian men. This report is also available on the NISU website.

Child care workers

Provides a profile of workers employed in child care services funded by the Commonwealth Government through the Children's Services Program (CSP).