Reports

Latest reports

Hospitalised injury due to land transport crashes 

This fact sheet focuses on hospitalised cases where a person was injured in an unintentional crash involving types of transport that operate on land. In 2014–15, nearly 57,000 people were hospitalised as the result of injuries sustained in land transport crashes. Of the cases where the crash location was specified, around 36,000 (64%) occurred in on-road crashes, and over 14,000 (26%) happened off-road. 

The fact sheet contains information about hospitalised injury cases due to land-transport crashes, particularly those that occurred on-road. This includes characteristics such as age and sex, type of road user and the main body regions affected.

Hospitalised assault injuries among men and boys 

This fact sheet examines cases of hospitalised assault against men in 2014–15. Almost 13,000 men and boys were hospitalised as a result of an assault. Rates of assault were highest at 20–24 years. Over half (61%) of all men and boys were assaulted by bodily force. The most common injury as a result of an assault was a fracture (40%). Half (53%) of all hospitalised assault injury cases involving men and boys had an unspecified person listed as the perpetrator. In cases where the perpetrator was specified, about two-thirds (64%, or 3,720) of hospitalised assault injuries were perpetrated by a person known to the victim.

Trends in hospitalised injury, Australia 1999–00 to 2014–15 

This report shows that the rate of hospitalised injury cases in Australia rose between 1999–00 and 2014–15 by an average of 1% per year. In 2014–15, case numbers and rates were higher for males than females for all age groups up to 60–64, and higher for females for those aged 65–69 and older.

Trends in hospitalised injury due to falls in older people 2002–03 to 2014–15 

This report focuses on trends in fall-related hospital care for people aged 65 and over from 2002–03 to 2014–15. Age-standardised rates of hospitalised fall injury cases increased over the period 2002–03 to 2014–15 for both men (3% per year) and women (2%). There was a decrease in the rate of hip fractures due to falls (–2% per year) between 2002–03 and 2014–15. In contrast, falls resulting in head injuries increased at a particularly high rate (7% per year).

Spinal cord injury, Australia 2014–15 

In 2014–15, 264 newly incident cases of traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) due to external causes were reported to the Australian Spinal Cord Injury Register. Males accounted for 4 in 5 (80%) of traumatic SCI cases. Land transport crashes (42%) were the leading mechanism of injury for cases of traumatic SCI sustained in 2014–15, followed by Falls (40%). Around one-third (35%) were sustained during sports or leisure activities.

Eye injuries in Australia 2010–11 to 2014–15 

This report shows 51,778 people were hospitalised as a result of an eye injury in the 5-year period, 1 July 2010 to 30 June 2015; two-thirds of these were males. Falls (35%) and assaults (23%) were the most common causes of eye injuries. The most common type of eye injury was an open wound of the eyelid and periocular area (27%). Some 86,602 presentations were made to an emergency department due to an eye injury in the 2-year period, 1 July 2013 to 30 June 2015; 1% of these presentations were admitted to hospital.

Impact of alcohol and illicit drug use on the burden of disease and injury in Australia: Australian Burden of Disease Study 2011  

This report quantifies the health impact that alcohol and illicit drug use place on Australia, including as risk factors for other diseases and injuries. It estimates that alcohol and illicit drugs were collectively responsible for 6.7% of Australia’s disease burden in 2011. The report highlights that health inequalities exist, with lower socioeconomic groups and more remote areas generally experiencing higher rates of disease burden due to alcohol and illicit drug use.

Hospitalised farm injury, Australia: 2010–11 to 2014–15 

Almost 22,000 people were hospitalised in the period from 2010–11 to 2014–15 as a result of injury which occurred on a farm; over three-quarters of them (77%) were males. Just over 71% of people hospitalised as a result of farm-related injury resided in Inner Regional and Outer regional remoteness zones. Injuries involving motorcycles and quad bikes accounted for 42% of hospitalisations in children aged 0–14 and 21% of hospitalisations in people aged 15 and over.
 

Spinal cord injury, Australia: summary 2008–09 to 2012–13  

Between 2008–09 and 2012–13, just over 1,200 people aged 15 and older sustained a traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) in Australia, and were admitted to a specialist spinal unit. Roughly 80% of cases were males. Land transport crashes, including motor vehicles and motor cycles, contributed to more than two-fifths (43%) of traumatic SCI cases during this 5-year period. Falls (36%) were the second most frequent cause.

Spinal cord injury, Australia 2013–14 

In 2013–14, 236 new incident cases of spinal cord injury (SCI) due to external causes were reported to the Australian Spinal Cord Injury Register. Males accounted for 81% of traumatic SCI cases. Land transport crashes (46%) were the leading mechanism of injury followed by falls (32%). Nearly half (45%) of traumatic SCI occurred while the person was engaged in a sport or leisure activity.

Spinal cord injury, Australia 2008–09 

For the 2008–09 period, 349 new cases of spinal cord injury (SCI) were reported to the Australian Spinal Cord Injury Register (ASCIR); three-quarters of which were due to traumatic causes. Males accounted for 80% of traumatic SCI cases. Land transport crashes and Falls were the most common cause of traumatic SCI, accounting for 78% overall, and 45% and 33% respectively.

Spinal cord injury, Australia 2009–10 

For the 2009–10 period, 314 new cases of spinal cord injury (SCI) were reported to the Australian Spinal Cord Injury Register (ASCIR), 72% of which were due to traumatic causes. Males accounted for 81% of traumatic SCI cases. Land transport crashes (47%) and Falls (34%) accounted for the majority of traumatic SCI cases during 2009–10.

Spinal cord injury, Australia 2010–11 

For the 2010–11 period, 387 new cases of spinal cord injury (SCI) were reported to the Australian Spinal Cord Injury Register (ASCIR), 70% of which were due to traumatic causes. Males accounted for 80% of traumatic SCI cases. Land transport crashes (43%) were the leading mechanism of injury for cases of traumatic SCI sustained in 2010–11, followed by Falls (35%).

Spinal cord injury, Australia 2011–12 

Some 220 cases of traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) due to external causes were reported to the Australian Spinal Cord Injury Register (ASCIR) for 2011–12. Unlike previous years reports, Falls were the leading mechanism of injury for traumatic SCI cases sustained during 2011–12, at 45%. Land transport crashes accounted for 38% of traumatic SCI.

Spinal cord injury, Australia 2012–13 

Some 241 cases of traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) due to external causes were reported to the Australian Spinal Cord Injury Register (ASCIR) for 2012–13. Males accounted for 78% of traumatic SCI cases. Land transport crashes (46%) were the leading mechanism of injury for cases of traumatic SCI sustained in 2012–13, followed by Falls (34%).

Work-related hospitalised injuries, Australia 2006–07 to 2013–14 

There were 617,755 hospitalised cases funded by workers’ compensation in Australia in the period from 2006–07 to 2013–14, with 72% being male and 96% aged 15–64. Almost 38% of these cases were hospitalised primarily due to a musculoskeletal-related condition while 32% were hospitalised primarily due to injury and poisoning. There were 234,104 hospitalised cases reported as work related over this period, with 61% being funded by workers’ compensation.

Hospital care for Australian sports injury 2012–13 

This report focuses on acute care services provided by hospitals for sports injuries treated in Australian hospitals in 2012–13. Cases of sports injury are examined in terms of the body region injured. Of the selected injury types, Head injury was the most common, accounting for 16% of all hospitalised sport related cases. Injury to the knee accounted for 12% of hospitalised sports injury. 

Trends in injury deaths, Australia 1999–00 to 2011–12 

This report focuses on trends in deaths due to injury and poisoning that occurred over the period 1999–00 to 2011–12. 
The age-standardised rate of injury deaths decreased from 55.4 to 47.2 deaths per 100,000 between 1999–00 and 2004–05 and changed little after that. Rates of injury deaths involving transport injury and homicide declined from 1999–00 to 2009–10, while rates for most other external cause groups fluctuated over this period. Rates for suicide deaths declined from 1999–00 until 2004–05 and remained relatively steady thereafter.
Rates for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people were generally at least twice as high as rates for non-Indigenous Australians over the period from 2001–02 to 2011–12.

Serious unintentional injury involving a railway train or tram, Australia, 2009–10 to 2013–14 

This report presents information on hospitalisations in Australia due to unintentional serious injury involving a train or tram for the 5-year period from 2009–10 to 2013–14. Over this 5-year period, there were 812 cases of serious injury involving a train (178 due to a level crossing collision), an average of 162 per year. Over the same period, there were 397 cases of serious injury involving a tram.

Dog-related injuries 

This fact sheet reports on hospitalisations that occurred as a result of being bitten or struck by a dog in 2013–14. In 2013–14, 3,644 hospitalised injury cases were due to being bitten by a dog, and 328 cases due to being struck by a dog. Overall, hospitalisations for dog-related injuries were more common in young children aged 0–9 (689 cases, 17%).

Firearm injuries and deaths 

This fact sheet examines hospitalisations (2013–14) and deaths (2012–13) that occurred as a result of firearm-related injuries. Over 90% of all firearm-related hospitalisations and deaths occurred among men. Over a third of hospitalised cases were the result of unintentional injury, one-third (33%) resulted from assault, and in almost one-fifth (19%) of cases, intent was undetermined. In contrast, over 79% of deaths resulted from intentional self-harm (suicide), while over 17% resulted from assault (homicide). Rates of firearm-related injuries for deaths fell between 1999–00 and 2013–14.