Reports

Featured reports

Monitoring the health impacts of mandatory folic acid and iodine fortification 2016 

This report assesses the health effects of mandatory folic acid and iodine fortification, introduced to help reduce the prevalence of neural tube defects and address the re emergence of iodine deficiency in the population. Mandatory fortification resulted in increased levels of folic acid and iodine in the food supply, increased folic acid and iodine intakes, a decreased rate of neural tube defects in Australia, and improved iodine status in the general populations in Australia and New Zealand.

A picture of overweight and obesity in Australia 

This report provides an overview of overweight and obesity in Australia—a major public health issue that has significant health and financial costs. Almost one-quarter of children and two-thirds of adults are overweight or obese, and rates continue to rise, largely due to a rise in obesity, which cost the economy $8.6 billion in 2011–12.

Additional overweight and obesity data are reported in 2 other AIHW products: Overweight and obesity in Australia: a birth cohort analysis and An interactive insight into overweight and obesity in Australia.

Risk factors to health 

Health risk factors are attributes, characteristics or exposures that increase the likelihood of a person developing a disease or health disorder. Behavioural risk factors are those that individuals have the most ability to modify. Biomedical risk factors are bodily states that are often influenced by behavioural risk factors.

Folic acid & iodine fortification 

Mandatory folic acid and iodine fortification of bread resulted in increased levels of folic acid and iodine in the food supply, increased folic acid and iodine intakes, a decreased rate of neural tube defects in Australia, and improved iodine status in the general populations in Australia and New Zealand.

Healthy lifestyle programs for physical activity and nutrition 

This paper describes the burden of lifestyle-related chronic diseases affecting Indigenous Australians. It assesses the evidence regarding the effectiveness of physical activity and nutrition programs and identifies strategies that have been demonstrated to be effective. It also reviews strategies that have the potential to be effective, based on their short-term effect or their effectiveness in non-Indigenous populations.

2010 Australian national infant feeding survey: indicator results 

The 2010 Australian National Infant Feeding Survey is the first specialised national survey of infant feeding practices in Australia. The survey also collected information on attitudes towards, and enablers for and barriers against breastfeeding. This report provides baseline data on key infant feeding indicators, including: - most babies (96%) were initially breastfed, but only 39% were exclusively breastfed for less than 4 months, and 15% for less than 6 months; - overall 35% of infants were introduced to solid foods by 4 months of age and 92% by the recommended age of 6 months; - around 7% of infants drank cow's milk by 6 months, with most not starting until the recommended age of 12 months.

Mandatory folic acid and iodine fortification in Australia and New Zealand: supplement to the baseline report for monitoring 

This supplement is a companion document to the Mandatory folic acid and iodine fortification in Australia and New Zealand: baseline report for monitoring. Additional or updated data are provided on: - folic acid intake and supplement usage for children and pregnant women; - NTD incidence rates; - iodine intake and status for children; - iodine status in regional and remote areas of the Northern Territory.

Profile of the nutritional status of children and adolescents 

The Profile of nutritional status of children and adolescents presents new analysis on data from the 1995 National Nutrition Survey. This preparatory analysis calculated baseline statistics that may be compared with new results from the 2007 Kids Eat, Kids Play survey. This report shows compiled 1995 data based on recommendations made in the 2005 Nutrient Reference Values. This report will be relevant anyone interested in children's nutrition at the population level, policy makers and researchers.

Towards national indicators for food and nutrition: an AIHW view: reporting against the Dietary Guidelines for Australian Adults 

Towards National Indicators for Food and Nutrition-an AIHW view provides an overview of existing measures for monitoring food and nutrition in Australia, relevant to the Dietary Guidelines for Australian Adults. The aim of the report is to contribute to food and nutrition monitoring and surveillance in Australia through informing indicator development and future data collection. The report also provides a status report on the nutrition of Australians.

Apparent consumption of nutrients, Australia 1997-98 

This report estimates the nutrient content in the food supply, from which assessments can be made as to whether the nutrients available for consumption in Australia are adequate to meet the needs of the population. Current until 14 April 2005.

The cost of diet-related disease in Australia 

This paper has been prepared on a collaborative basis by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare and the National Centre for Health Program Evaluation. While cognisant of the scope and limitations of the information presented, the authors believe it will help to stimulate discussion and provide a useful contribution to the work being undertaken on the development of a National Food and Nutrition Policy.