Reports

Featured reports

National Drug Strategy Household Survey 2016: detailed findings 

This 2016 National Drug Strategy Household Survey report shows that: the decline in daily smoking slowed in 2016 but improvements were seen among people living in the lowest socioeconomic area; certain groups disproportionately experience drug-related risks and recent use of illicit drugs was particularly high for people who identified as homosexual or bisexual; just under 4 in 10 Australians either smoked daily, drank alcohol in ways that put them at risk of harm or used an illicit drug in the previous 12 months.

Tobacco indicators: measuring midpoint progress—reporting under the National Tobacco Strategy 2012–2018 

This report presents midpoint data for several tobacco indicators using various data sources and collections years. The majority of indicators show that favourable progress has been made, particularly for exposure to tobacco smoke, uptake of smoking, transition to established smoking and regular smoking among young people, adults and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. However, some groups achieved greater progress than others, and inequalities within particular groups increased for some indicators.

Risk factors to health 

Health risk factors are attributes, characteristics or exposures that increase the likelihood of a person developing a disease or health disorder. Behavioural risk factors are those that individuals have the most ability to modify. Biomedical risk factors are bodily states that are often influenced by behavioural risk factors.

National Drug Strategy Household Survey (NDSHS) 2016—key findings  

This web-based release presents a summary of the national findings from the 2016 National Drug Strategy Household Survey. The 2016 NDSHS show that younger people (aged under 30) were smoking less, drinking less and using fewer illicit drugs in 2016 than in 2001. However, for people in their 40s, 50s and 60s, there was little to no change in drug usage behaviours over this period but their use of some drugs has increased between 2013 and 2016.

Tobacco Indicators Baseline Data: Reporting under the National Tobacco Strategy 2012–2018 

This report presents baseline data for several tobacco indicators using various data sources and collections years. The baseline showed that some groups are at much higher risk of smoking or being exposed to second-hand smoke, including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, those living in remote or socioeconomically disadvantaged areas, and single parents with dependent children.

National Drug Strategy Household Survey detailed report: 2013 

This 2013 National Drug Strategy Household Survey report shows that: - fewer Australians are smoking daily and are smoking less cigarettes; - fewer people are exceeding the lifetime risk and single occasion risk guidelines for alcohol use; - overall illicit drug use has remained stable but some drugs have declined and some have increased; - alcohol continues to be the drug of most concern to the community but an increasing number of people are concerned about meth/amphetamines.

Smoking and quitting smoking among prisoners 2012 

This bulletin presents results from the 2012 National Prisoner Health Data Collection, focusing on smoking and smoking cessation behaviours of prisoners in Australia. In 2012, 84% of prison entrants were current smokers, which is around 5 times the proportion of the general community. Quitting smoking in prison is difficult: 35% of prisoners who were about to be released tried to quit during their time in prison, but only 8% were successful.

Drugs in Australia 2010: tobacco, alcohol and other drugs 

Drugs in Australia 2010 provides a comprehensive summary of Australians' consumption of alcohol, tobacco and other drugs and use of treatment services, drawing on the latest statistics from major national collections. It also includes information about drug-related health issues, and drugs in the context of crime and law enforcement.

The health of Australia's prisoners 2010 

The health of Australia's prisoners 2010 is the second report on indicators of prisoner health in Australia. The two-week snapshot showed that: almost 1 in 3 prison entrants had ever been told they have a mental health disorder and 1 in 5 prisoners in custody were taking medication for a mental health condition. More than 4 in 5 prison entrants currently smoked tobacco; over half reported drinking alcohol at risk levels; and 2 in 3 had used illicit drugs during the previous 12 months. Further, more than 1 in 3 prison entrants had not completed Year 10 at school; and 1 in 4 prison entrants had a chronic condition such as asthma, cardiovascular disease or diabetes. The report also contains data relating to communicable diseases, deaths in custody, and the use of prison health services.