Reports

Featured reports

Cardiovascular health compendium 

The AIHW has developed core monitoring information on the prevalence, incidence, hospitalisation and deaths from CVD (including coronary heart disease, stroke, heart failure) in Australia that is updated on a regular basis on the AIHW website to ensure that the most up-to-date information and trends is easily accessible and available. 

Trends in cardiovascular deaths 

Despite falling cardiovascular disease death rates across all age groups in Australia, the rate of decline in younger age groups has slowed in recent decades. This report describes trends in cardiovascular disease death rates (including coronary heart disease and cerebrovascular disease) by age group using the latest available data. It builds on previous reports where slowdowns in younger age groups were also found.

Risk factors to health 

Health risk factors are attributes, characteristics or exposures that increase the likelihood of a person developing a disease or health disorder. Behavioural risk factors are those that individuals have the most ability to modify. Biomedical risk factors are bodily states that are often influenced by behavioural risk factors.

Contribution of vascular diseases and risk factors to the burden of dementia in Australia: Australian Burden of Disease Study 2011 

This report describes a range of modifiable vascular risk factors for dementia, and estimates their individual and combined contribution to the burden of dementia in Australia. Vascular risk factors in this study include smoking, physical inactivity, mid-life high blood pressure and mid-life obesity, as well as vascular diseases that act as risk factors for dementia—diabetes, stroke, atrial fibrillation and chronic kidney disease. It uses burden of disease estimates from the Australian Burden of Disease Study 2011 and evidence in the literature that shows a link between these vascular risk factors and development of dementia in later life. It shows that about 30% of the total dementia burden in Australia is due to the joint effect of the vascular risk factors examined; highlighting the potential for preventing dementia and reducing dementia-related burden.

Better Cardiac Care measures for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people: second national report 2016  

This is the second national report on the 21 Better Cardiac Care measures for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, with updated data available to report on 11 measures. For some of the measures, a better or similar rate for Indigenous Australians compared with non-Indigenous Australians was apparent, while on other measures, higher rates of ill health and death from cardiac conditions and lower rates of in-hospital treatment services among Indigenous Australians were evident. A number of measures suggested improvements for Indigenous Australians over time; examples include a decline in the death rate due to cardiac conditions and an increase in the proportion who received an MBS health assessment.

Cardiovascular disease, diabetes and chronic kidney disease—Australian facts: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people 

Cardiovascular disease, diabetes and chronic kidney disease—Australian facts is a series of 5 reports by the National Centre for Monitoring Vascular Diseases at the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare that describe the combined burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD), diabetes and chronic kidney disease (CKD). This report on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people presents up-to-date statistics on risk factors, prevalence, hospitalisation and deaths from these 3 chronic diseases. It examines age and sex characteristics and variations by geographical location and compares these with the non-Indigenous population.

Prevalence of type 1 diabetes among children aged 0–14 in Australia 2013 

Prevalence of type 1 diabetes among children aged 0–14 in Australia 2013 presents the first national picture of children aged 0–14 living with type 1 diabetes in Australia. The report, based on data from the National (insulin-treated) Diabetes Register, highlights that in 2013, 6,091 children aged 0–14 had type 1 diabetes in Australia. This represented 139 cases per 100,000 population, or about 1 in 720 Australians aged 0–14. About 2 in 5 children with type 1 diabetes used an insulin pump to administer insulin. The prevalence of type 1 diabetes among children differed by age, state/territory, and residential remoteness areas.