Reports

Featured reports

Australia's health 2016 

Australia's health 2016 is the AIHW’s 15th biennial report on the health of Australians. It examines a wide range of contemporary topics in a series of analytical feature articles and short statistical snapshots. The report also summaries the performance of the health system against an agreed set of indicators.

Australia's health 2016—in brief 

Australia’s health 2016—in brief presents highlights from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare’s 15th biennial report on the nation’s health, Australia’s health 2016.

National Health Data Dictionary: version 16.1 

The National Health Data Dictionary (NHDD) provides national data standards for the health sector. This version (Version 16.1) reflects changes to data standards between May 2012 and the end of June 2013. Six national minimum data sets, 5 data set specifications, 61 data elements, 4 classification schemes and 5 glossary items have been added to the NHDD. Eighteen national minimum data sets, 15 data set specifications, 89 data elements, 6 classification schemes and 5 glossary items have been superseded or retired since the previous version of the NHDD (Version 16) was published.

National Health Data Dictionary: version 16.2 

The National Health Data Dictionary (NHDD) provides national data standards for the health sector. This version (Version 16.2) reflects changes to data standards between July 2013 and June 2014. Eight national minimum data sets, 12 data set specifications, 16 data element clusters, 174 data elements, 13 classification schemes and 13 glossary items have been added to the NHDD. Nine national minimum data sets, 4 data set specifications, 7 data element clusters, 64 data elements, 1 classification schemes and 1 glossary item have been superseded and 12 data elements have been retired since the previous version of the NHDD (Version 16.1) was published.

Australia's health 2014—in brief 

Australia’s health 2014—in brief presents highlights from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare’s 14th biennial report on the nation’s health.

Australia's health 2014 

Australia's health 2014 is the 14th biennial health report of the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare. This edition combines analytical feature articles on highly topical health issues with short statistical snapshots in the following areas: Understanding health and illness; The Australian health system; How healthy are we?; Leading types of ill health; Health behaviours and risks; Health through your life; Indigenous health; Preventing and treating ill health; Indicators of Australia's health.

National definitions for elective surgery urgency categories: proposal for the Standing Council on Health 

In 2012, the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare and the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons worked together to develop national definitions for elective surgery urgency categories, at the request of the Standing Council on Health. The development of the national definitions resulted in a package of six integrated components proposed for adoption. This report presents the proposed definitions and components.

Food for thought: what do short questions on food habits tell us about dietary intakes? 

Short questions on food habits, such as 'How many serves of fruit do you usually eat each day?' are often used to assess dietary behaviours. This report presents analysis of the 2007 Australian National Children's Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey to assess how well responses to short questions compare with more comprehensive tools, such as keeping a diary of all food eaten over two 24-hour periods. Results show that short questions may be a reasonable proxy for type of milk usually consumed and a reasonable approximation of fruit and vegetable intake, but are of limited value for predicting sodium or iodine intakes.

Australia's health 2012 

Australia's health 2012 is the thirteenth biennial health report of the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare. It is the most comprehensive and authoritative source of national information on health in Australia.

Australia's health 2012: in brief 

Australia's health 2012: in brief presents highlights from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfares thirteenth biennial report on the nations health.

National health data dictionary, version 15 

The July 2010 revision to the National Health Data Dictionary (NHDD) including national minimum data sets (NMDS) has now been released and is available on the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) website. As part of the METeOR metadata online registry, the dictionary's purpose is to provide national standards on the health reporting framework for both statistical and clinical analysis which provides meaningful input to community discussion and public policy debate on health issues in Australia. The Dictionary is available online at http://meteor.aihw.gov.au. This version confirms to international standard ISO/IEC 11179 Information Technology Metadata Registries (MDR), 2003.

Australia's health 2010 

Australia's health 2010 is the 12th biennial health report of the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare. It's the nation's premier source of statistics and informed commentary on: determinants of health and keys to prevention; diseases and injury; how health varies across population groups; health across the life stages; health services, expenditure and workforce; the health sector's performance. If you're interested in health, Australia's health 2010 is an essential reference for your bookshelf.

Australia's health 2010: in brief 

All in all, Australia is a healthy nation. We do face challenges, however, and there is certainly scope for improvement. Australia's health 2010 - in brief presents key points and trends from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare's 12th biennial report card about the nation's health, Australia's health 2010.

Risk factors and participation in work 

This report builds on the previous AIHW report Chronic disease and participation in work by showing the association between risk factors and participation in work. In 2004-05, nearly all (96%) working-age people in Australia reported one health risk factor, and three-quarters reported more than one. People who reported three or more risk factors were significantly more likely to not participate in the labour force compared with those who reported no risk factors. Absentee rates for people who reported a risk factor and a chronic disease were significantly higher compared with people reporting no risk factors and no chronic disease. This report is a further reminder of the importance of reducing risk factor prevalence to lessen the impact of future chronic disease among working-age people.

A guide to Australian eye health data, 2nd edition 

A guide to Australian eye health data describes key Australian data collections which indicate the prevalence and outcomes of eye diseases and injuries and eye health care utilisation. It assesses how these collections inform the National Framework for Action to Promote Eye Health and Prevent Avoidable Blindness and Vision Loss.

Australia's health 2008 

Australia's health 2008 is the 11th biennial health report of the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare. It's the nation's premier source of statistics and informed commentary on: - patterns and determinants of health and illness- health across the life stages- the supply and use of health services- expenditure and workforce- and health sector performance.If you're interested in health, this is THE essential reference for your bookshelf.

Young Australians: their health and wellbeing 2007 

'Young Australians: their health and wellbeing 2007' is the third national statistical report on young people in Australia. Using a set of key indicators of health and wellbeing of young people, this report brings together the most up-to-date national data on the health status of young Australians aged 12-24 years and the factors influencing their health. Information on health status includes self-assessed health status, disability, injury, mental health, chronic disease, communicable diseases, hospitalisations and mortality. Factors influencing health addressed in this report include family and community environments, environmental factors, socioeconomic factors including education, employment and income and health behaviours such as weight, physical activity, nutrition and substance use. This report also includes a special section on the health and welfare of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people. Timely, comprehensive and accurate information on these factors will enable the formulation of appropriate and effective policies and interventions to achieve long term health and wellbeing for young people.

A guide to Australian eye health data 

A guide to Australian eye health data describes key Australian data collections which indicate the prevalence and outcomes of eye diseases and injuries and eye health care utilisation. It assesses how these collections inform the National Framework for Action to Promote Eye Health and Prevent Avoidable Blindness and Vision Loss. The report also presents a discussion on the key definitional issues surrounding eye health terminology and presents useful information for the development of future performance indicators in eye health.

A guide to data development 

For more than a decade, the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) has been undertaking data development, and assisting other organisations with related activities. In doing so, the AIHW has developed a body of expertise in data development. Much of this experience has been distilled into 'A guide to data development'. The guide covers the basics of data development and the steps to follow when developing data. It outlines sound data development practices that incorporate the necessary steps to produce high-quality data that meet the needs of all users of the data and attract the necessary level of agreement on content and authority behind the data specifications. The document promotes the role of metadata in describing data and the use of data standards to improve consistency in data recording where data consistency and comparability is required.