Reports

Featured reports

Primary health care in Australia 

Primary health care is the entry level to the health system and, as such, is usually a person’s first encounter with the health system. It includes a broad range of activities and services, from health promotion and prevention, to treatment and management of acute and chronic conditions. This report includes sources of Primary Health Network (PHN) data, expenditure, delivery of primary health care services including the scope and patient experience. 

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health organisations: Online Services Report—key results 2015–16 

This is the eighth national report on organisations funded by the Australian Government to provide health services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. In 2015–16: 204 organisations provided primary health-care services to around 461,500 clients through 5.4 million client contacts and 3.9 million episodes of care; 216 counsellors from 93 organisations provided social and emotional wellbeing services to around 18,900 clients through 88,900 client contacts; 80 organisations provided substance-use services to around 32,700 clients through 170,400 episodes of care.

National Key Performance Indicators for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander primary health care: results from June 2016 

This fourth national report on the national Key Performance Indicators (nKPIs) data collection is based on data from more than 240 primary health care organisations that received funding from the Australian Government Department of Health to provide services primarily to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. Information is presented for 22 ‘process-of-care’ and ‘health outcome’ indicators for June 2016, which focus on maternal and child health, preventative health, and chronic disease management. The report shows continuous improvements for the majority of indicators.

Healthy Futures—Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services Report Card 2016 

This report card provides information from about 140 Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHS) providing care to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians. During 2014–15 these services saw about 275,000 Indigenous clients who received almost 2.5 million episodes of care. About 228,700 Indigenous Australians were regular clients of ACCHSs, where they received maternal and child health services, chronic disease risk factor prevention, and management services. This report card shows rises in the proportion of clients receiving appropriate processes of care for 10 of the 16 relevant indicators.

The measurement of patient experience in non-GP primary health care settings 

This working paper was funded by the Australian Health Ministers’ Advisory Council and overseen by the National Health Information Standards and Statistics Committee. The paper documents existing approaches for measuring patient experience within non-GP primary health care settings. Information about patient experience is an important tool for health care quality improvement and health performance reporting. While there have been selected activities to standardise and validate patient experience information in hospital and GP settings, there has been limited documentation of patient experience information within the non-GP primary health care sector. This paper will help inform future work in the area of patient experience in primary health care settings.

Social distribution of health risks and health outcomes: preliminary analysis of the National Health Survey 2007-08 

Where people are born, grow, live, work and age affects their health status. This paper explores the association between selected social and health risk factors on Australians' health. It shows that people with higher household incomes and higher education qualifications are more likely to report better health and less likely to report smoking, and people living outside major cities are more likely to report being an unhealthy weight.

Dialysis and kidney transplantation in Australia: 1991-2010 

End-stage kidney disease is a serious and costly health problem in Australia that usually requires kidney replacement therapy (dialysis or kidney transplantation) for patients to survive. At the end of 2009 there were more than 18,000 people receiving kidney replacement therapy. The majority received dialysis treatment, which accounted for more than 1.1 million hospitalisations in the 2009-10 financial year. During 2009 more than 2,300 patients started kidney replacement therapy and 772 kidney transplant operations were performed.

Perinatal depression: data from the 2010 Australian National Infant Feeding Survey 

Data from the 2010 Australian National Infant Feeding Survey showed that 1 in 5 (20%) mothers of children aged 24 months or less had been diagnosed with depression. More than half of these mothers reported being diagnosed with depression during the perinatal period. Perinatal depression was more commonly reported among mothers who were younger (aged under 25), smokers, overweight/obese and from lower income households.

A working guide to international comparisons of health 

Comparisons of health between countries are popular and useful, and often attract media attention. This guide highlights the types of questions to ask before comparing countries and when presenting health data in an international context.

Comorbidity of mental disorders and physical conditions 2007 

This report investigates the prevalence of mental illness in association with common chronic diseases and shows that in 2007: 12% of Australians aged 16-85 had a mental disorder and a physical condition at the same time; the most common comorbidity was anxiety disorder combined with a physical condition, affecting around 1.4 million (9%) Australian adults; people living in the most disadvantaged areas of Australia were 65% more likely to have comorbidity than those living in the least disadvantaged areas.

General practice activity in Australia 2000-01 to 2009-10: 10 year data tables 

This report presents results from the most recent 10 years (April 2000 to March 2010) of the BEACH program, a national cross-sectional study of general practice activity. During this time 9,842 GPs provided details of almost 1 million GP-patient encounters. Readers can review changes that have occurred over the decade in the characteristics of general practitioners and the patients they see; the problems managed; and the treatments provided. Changes in patients' body mass index, smoking status and alcohol use are described for a subsample of adult patients.

General practice activity in Australia 2009-10 

This report presents results from the twelfth year of BEACH program, a national study of general practice activity. From April 2009 to March 2010, 988 general practitioners recorded data about 98,800 GP-patient encounters involving the management of 155,373 problems. For an 'average' 100 encounters, GPs recorded 107 medications, 35 clinical treatments, 18 procedures, 9 referrals to specialists and 4 to allied health services, and ordered 45 pathology and 10 imaging tests.

General practice activity in Australia 2008-09 

This report presents results from the eleventh year of the BEACH program, a national study of general practice activity. From April 2008 to March 2009, 1,011 general practitioners recorded data about 101,100 GP-patient encounters involving the management of 149,462 problems. For an `average' 100 encounters, GPs recorded 106 medications, 34 clinical treatments, 17 procedures, 9 referrals to specialists and 4 to allied health services, and ordered 46 pathology and 10 imaging tests.

General practice activity in Australia 1999-00 to 2008-09: 10 year data tables 

This report presents results from the most recent 10 years (April 1999 to March 2008) of the BEACH program, a national cross-sectional study of general practice activity. During this time 9,901 GPs provided details of almost 1 million GP-patient encounters. Readers can review changes that have occurred over the decade in the characteristics of general practitioners and the patients they see; the problems managed and the treatments provided. Changes in patients' body mass index, smoking status and alcohol use are described for a subsample of adult patients.

General practice in Australia, health priorities and policies 1998 to 2008 

This report looks extensively at changes in the activities of GPs from 1998 to 2008 in the light of numerous government initiatives and changes in the GP workforce and in the population. It shows that GP activity generally correlates well with health policy initiatives and clinical guidelines, notably with Type 2 diabetes and the control of asthma and high blood cholesterol levels. In some areas, however, there is less evidence of an effect so far. The report also raises some potential concerns about the costs from the continued rapid growth in orders for pathology testing and the overall challenge for the GP workforce in dealing with an ageing population with complex needs. Edited by Britt H and Miller GC.

General practice activity in Australia 2007-08 

This publication is the 22nd in the General practice series produced by the Australian General Practice Statistics and Classification Centre, a collaborating unit of the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare and the University of Sydney. It reports the results of the tenth year of the BEACH program, April 2007 to March 2008. Data reported by 953 general practitioners on 95,300 GP-patient encounters are used to describe aspects of general practice in Australia: the general practitioners and their patients; the problems managed and the treatments provided. The contribution of practice nurses to the GP-patient encounters in terms of their clinical activities, the problems they assist with and the Medicare items claimed, are described in this report. Information on body weight to height ratio, smoking status and alcohol use for a subsample of patients is also provided.

General practice activity in Australia 1998-99 to 2007-08: 10 year data tables 

This publication is the 23rd in the General Practice Series produced by the Australian General Practice Statistics and Classification Centre, a collaborating unit of the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare and the University of Sydney. It presents results from each of the ten years of the BEACH program, April 1998 to March 2008. There have been 9,875 participating GPs who have provided details of almost 1 million GP-patient encounters, made up of ten annual samples of about 100,000 encounters records from around 1,000 randomly selected general practitioners. Results are provided for the more frequent events occurring in general practice in any of the ten years of the study. Readers can review changes that have occurred over the decade in the characteristics of general practitioners and the patients they see; the problems managed and the treatments provided. Information on body weight to height ratio, smoking status and alcohol use for annual subsamples of patients in each year, 1998-99 to 2007-08, is provided.

General practice activity in Australia 2006-07 

This publication is the 21st in the General Practice Series produced by the Australian General Practice Statistics and Classification Centre, a Collaborating Unit of the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare and the University of Sydney. It reports the results of the ninth year of the BEACH program, April 2006 to March 2007. Data reported by 930 general practitioners on 93,000 GP-patient encounters are used to describe aspects of general practice in Australia: the general practitioners and their patients; the problems managed and the treatments provided. Changes that have occurred over the last nine years of the BEACH study, from 1998-99 to 2006-07 are investigated. In addition, changes in the management of type 2 diabetes and depression from 1998-99 to 2006-07 are considered in light of changes in policy The contribution of practice nurses to the GP-patient encounters in terms of their clinical activities, the problems they assist with and the Medicare items claimed are described in this report. Information on body weight to height ratio, smoking status and alcohol use for a subsample of patients is provided. Abstracts and research tools used in other BEACH substudies from 2006-07 are also included.

Patient-based substudies from BEACH: abstracts and research tools 1999-2006 

Patient-based substudies from BEACH: abstracts and research tools 1999-2006 is the 20th report in the general practice series produced by the Australian General Practice Statistics and Classification Centre, University of Sydney, a collaborating unit of the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare. This report includes abstracts for, and research tools used, in 104 general practice substudies conducted as part of the BEACH (Bettering the Evaluation and Care of Health) program. BEACH is a continuous national study of general practice activity. Since 1998 over 9,000 GPs have recorded details regarding approximately 900,000 GP-patient encounters on structured paper forms. The substudies are referred to as SAND (Supplementary Analysis of Nominated data). There is a SAND section at the bottom of every encounter form, in which we investigate aspects of patient health or health care delivery not covered by the encounter-based data. We hope that this report will assist GPs and other researchers by providing them with a wide range of tools that have demonstrated acceptability and utility, that are useable in the confines of general practice patient consultations, and which have already been approved by recognised ethics committees.

General practice activity in Australia 2005-06 

This publication is the 19th in the General Practice Series produced by the Australian General Practice Statistics and Classification Centre, a collaborating unit of the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare and the University of Sydney. It reports the results of the eighth year of the BEACH program, April 2005 to March 2006. Data reported by 1,017 general practitioners on 101,700 GP-patient encounters are used to describe aspects of general practice in Australia: the general practitioners and their patients; the problems managed and the treatments provided. The contribution of practice nurses to the GP-patient encounters, in terms of their clinical activities, the problems they assist with and the Medicare items claimed, are described for the first time in this report. Information on body weight to height ratio, smoking status and alcohol use of a subsample of patients is also provided. Changes that have occurred since 1999-00 are investigated. Data for each of the last 5 years of BEACH are summarised in the appendixes to this report.

Medical indemnity national data collection, public sector 2004-05 

This report presents data on the number, nature, incidence and costs of public sector medical indemnity claims for the period 1 July 2004 to 30 June 2005. It describes incidents that gave rise to claims, the people affected by these incidents, and the size, duration and outcomes of medical indemnity claims.This is the third report originating from the Medical Indemnity National Collection (public sector). This report will be useful for policy makers, health administrators, clinicians and health professionals, and health service users.