Reports

Featured reports

Youth justice in Australia 2015–16 

There were about 5,500 young people (aged 10 and older) under youth justice supervision in Australia on an average day in 2015–16, due to their involvement, or alleged involvement, in crime. This number has decreased by 21% over the 5 years to 2015–16. Around 4 in 5 (82%) young people under supervision on an average day were male. Most (84%) young people were supervised in the community and the remainder were in detention. Indigenous young people continued to be over-represented in the youth justice system: young Indigenous people were 17 times as likely as non-Indigenous young people to be under supervision on an average day.

Young people returning to sentenced youth justice supervision 2015–16 

The majority of young people who receive a supervised youth justice sentence serve only 1 sentence, and do not return. For those born from 1990–91 to 1997–98, about 61% had only 1 sentence before the age of 18. Of the young people aged 10–16 in 2014–15 who were released from sentenced community-based supervision, about 22% returned to sentenced supervision in 6 months, and 46% returned within 12 months. Of those released from sentenced detention, 48% returned to sentenced supervision within 6 months, and 74% returned within 12 months.

Young people in child protection and under youth justice supervision 2015–16 

This report presents information on people aged 10–16 who were in the child protection system and under youth justice supervision from 1 July 2014 to 30 June 2016. Young people under youth justice supervision were 12 times as likely as the general population to be in the child protection system. Indigenous Australians were 16 times as likely as their non-Indigenous counterpart to be both in the child protection system and under youth justice supervision.

Youth detention population in Australia 2016 

This bulletin presents information on the youth detention population in Australia, focusing on quarterly trends from June 2012 to June 2016. There were just over 900 young people in detention on an average night in the June quarter 2016, just over half (57%) of whom were unsentenced. Numbers and rates of young people in detention dropped slightly over the 4 years, despite a slight increase in the most recent year. Just over half (55%) of all young people in detention on an average night were Indigenous.

Vulnerable young people: interactions across homelessness, youth justice and child protection: 1 July 2011 to 30 June 2015 

This report reveals that individuals who experience multiple, cross-sector services in the specialist homelessness, protection or youth justice service areas are a particularly vulnerable group. Clients experiencing 2 or more of these services were more likely than specialist homelessness services-only clients: to report having substance use issues; to report having mental health issues; to have an over-representation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people; and to receive more days of support and more support periods from specialist homelessness services agencies.

Young people in child protection and under youth justice supervision 2014–15 

This report presents information on young people aged 10–17 who were both in the child protection system and under youth justice supervision in 2014–15; it demonstrates the insights that can be gained through data linkage. Two (2) in 5 (40.8%) young people in youth justice detention in 2014–15 were also in the child protection system that year. Those who were younger at their first youth justice supervision were more likely to also be in child protection.

Youth detention entries and exits: 2014–15 

This fact sheet provides information about the numbers of young people under youth justice supervision who were received into, and/or released from, detention in 2014–15. A reception is when a young person enters detention having not been detained immediately before. Conversely, a release is when a young person leaves detention and is not detained immediately after.

Youth justice in Australia 2014–15 

There were about 5,600 young people (aged 10 and older) under youth justice supervision in Australia on an average day in 2014–15, due to their involvement, or alleged involvement, in crime. This number has decreased by 23% over the 5 years to 2014–15. Around 4 in 5 (82%) young people under supervision on an average day were male. Most (85%) young people were supervised in the community and the remainder were in detention. Although rates of supervision decreased over the 5-year period for both Indigenous and non-Indigenous young people, the level of Indigenous over-representation increased.

Young people in child protection and under youth justice supervision 2013–14 

This report presents information on young people aged 10–17 who were involved in the child protection system and under youth justice supervision in 2013–14, and demonstrates the insights that can be gained through data linkage. Nearly half (45%) of young people in youth justice detention were also in the child protection system in the same year. Those who were younger at their first youth justice supervision were more likely to also be in child protection.

Youth detention population in Australia 2015 

This bulletin presents information on the youth detention population in Australia, focusing on quarterly trends from June 2011 to June 2015. There were fewer than 900 young people in detention on an average night in the June quarter 2015, just over half (55%) of whom were unsentenced. Numbers and rates of young people in detention dropped slightly over the 4 years, but trends varied among the states and territories. Just over half (54%) of all young people in detention on an average night were Indigenous.

Developing a linked data collection to report on the relationships between child protection and youth justice supervision 

Using available national data to understand the characteristics of children and young people who are both in the child protection system and under youth justice supervision, and their pathways through these systems, would assist support staff, case workers and policy makers to achieve optimal outcomes for children and young people and for their families. This report describes how these data collections can be linked and how the relationships between child protection and youth justice supervision can be explored.

Youth justice in Australia 2013–14 

There were 6,100 young people under youth justice supervision in Australia on an average day in 2013–14, due to their involvement, or alleged involvement, in crime. This number has fallen from about 6,400 in 2012–13. Most (85%) of these young people were supervised in the community and the remainder were in detention. Young people spent 26 weeks, on average, under supervision during the year.