Reports

Featured reports

Children’s Headline Indicators 

The Children’s Headline Indicators (CHI) are a set of 19 indicators endorsed by the Australian Health Ministers' Conference, Community and Disability Services Ministers' Conference and the Australian Education, Early Childhood Development and Youth Affairs Senior Officials Committee. They are high level measureable indicators that identify the immediate environments as particularly important to children’s health, development and wellbeing. The CHI are presented from 2006 to 2016, depending on CHI, and are grouped into 3 broad topic areas—Health, Early learning and care and Family and community.

National Youth Information Framework (NYIF) indicators 

The National Youth Information Framework (NYIF) dynamic data displays provide the latest available information on how Australia’s young people aged 12–24 are faring. The National Youth Information Framework covers 5 key areas (or tiers), with a total of 38 indicators across 16 sub-domains in this 2015 release. Disagregations include age, sex and Indigenous status. A quick reference guide illustrating the 38 indicators by sub-domain including the most recent data and trends for each indicator has also been included.

Young people returning to sentenced youth justice supervision 2015–16 

The majority of young people who receive a supervised youth justice sentence serve only 1 sentence, and do not return. For those born from 1990–91 to 1997–98, about 61% had only 1 sentence before the age of 18. Of the young people aged 10–16 in 2014–15 who were released from sentenced community-based supervision, about 22% returned to sentenced supervision in 6 months, and 46% returned within 12 months. Of those released from sentenced detention, 48% returned to sentenced supervision within 6 months, and 74% returned within 12 months.

Juvenile arthritis 

Juvenile arthritis includes several different kinds of arthritis occurring in children, causing significant pain, disability and restrictions in school and other activities. Juvenile arthritis affects less than 1% of children and is more common in girls than boys.

Specialist homelessness services 2015–16 

The specialist homelessness services 2015–16 web report is the fifth annual report from the Specialist Homelessness Services Collection (SHSC). It describes the characteristics of clients of specialist homelessness services, the services requested, outcomes achieved, and unmet requests for services during 2015–16.

Youth detention population in Australia 2016 

This bulletin presents information on the youth detention population in Australia, focusing on quarterly trends from June 2012 to June 2016. There were just over 900 young people in detention on an average night in the June quarter 2016, just over half (57%) of whom were unsentenced. Numbers and rates of young people in detention dropped slightly over the 4 years, despite a slight increase in the most recent year. Just over half (55%) of all young people in detention on an average night were Indigenous.

Vulnerable young people: interactions across homelessness, youth justice and child protection: 1 July 2011 to 30 June 2015 

This report reveals that individuals who experience multiple, cross-sector services in the specialist homelessness, protection or youth justice service areas are a particularly vulnerable group. Clients experiencing 2 or more of these services were more likely than specialist homelessness services-only clients: to report having substance use issues; to report having mental health issues; to have an over-representation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people; and to receive more days of support and more support periods from specialist homelessness services agencies.

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) among children and young people with type 1 diabetes 

This fact sheet provides the most recent available data on hospitalisations for diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA)—a serious complication of diabetes. It highlights that DKA continues to affect many children and young people with type 1 diabetes, in particular females and those living in regional and remote areas and in lower socioeconomic areas.

Young people in child protection and under youth justice supervision 2014–15 

This report presents information on young people aged 10–17 who were both in the child protection system and under youth justice supervision in 2014–15; it demonstrates the insights that can be gained through data linkage. Two (2) in 5 (40.8%) young people in youth justice detention in 2014–15 were also in the child protection system that year. Those who were younger at their first youth justice supervision were more likely to also be in child protection.

Poisoning in children and young people 2012–13 

This report provides information about children and young people aged 0–24 who were hospitalised as a result of poisoning in Australia. Almost half (49%) of all cases occurred among 18–24 year olds and a quarter among 15–17 year olds (26%). The highest rate of poisoning by pharmaceuticals was seen in 15–17 year old girls (589 cases per 100,000). The majority (37%) of these cases were caused by non-opioid analgesics (for example, ibuprofen and paracetamol).

Youth justice in Australia 2014–15 

There were about 5,600 young people (aged 10 and older) under youth justice supervision in Australia on an average day in 2014–15, due to their involvement, or alleged involvement, in crime. This number has decreased by 23% over the 5 years to 2014–15. Around 4 in 5 (82%) young people under supervision on an average day were male. Most (85%) young people were supervised in the community and the remainder were in detention. Although rates of supervision decreased over the 5-year period for both Indigenous and non-Indigenous young people, the level of Indigenous over-representation increased.

The views of children and young people in out-of-home care: overview of indicator results from a pilot national survey 2015 

This bulletin presents an overview of results from a 2015 national pilot data collection on the views of children in out-of-home care. Key findings include 91% of children reporting feeling both safe and settled in their current placement; 97% reporting that they had an adult who cares about what happens to them now and in the future; and 67% reporting that they usually get to have a say in what happens to them, and that people usually listen to what they say.

Young people in child protection and under youth justice supervision 2013–14 

This report presents information on young people aged 10–17 who were involved in the child protection system and under youth justice supervision in 2013–14, and demonstrates the insights that can be gained through data linkage. Nearly half (45%) of young people in youth justice detention were also in the child protection system in the same year. Those who were younger at their first youth justice supervision were more likely to also be in child protection.

Specialist homelessness services 2014–15 

The Specialist homelessness services 2014–15 web report is the fourth annual report from the Specialist Homelessness Services Collection and the first presented as a web report. It describes the characteristics of clients of specialist homelessness services, the services requested, outcomes achieved, and unmet requests for services during 2014–15.

Developing a linked data collection to report on the relationships between child protection and youth justice supervision 

Using available national data to understand the characteristics of children and young people who are both in the child protection system and under youth justice supervision, and their pathways through these systems, would assist support staff, case workers and policy makers to achieve optimal outcomes for children and young people and for their families. This report describes how these data collections can be linked and how the relationships between child protection and youth justice supervision can be explored.

Educational outcomes for children in care: linking 2013 child protection and NAPLAN data 

This report presents a snapshot of the academic performance of Australian children in the care of child protection services in 2013. Findings are based on the linkage of data from the Child Protection National Minimum Data Set and the National Assessment Program—Literacy and Numeracy. This report shows that the proportion of children in care meeting the national minimum standards (NMS) for literacy and numeracy varied (ranging from 44% to 83% across assessment domains and year levels).

Prevalence of type 1 diabetes among children aged 0–14 in Australia 2013 

Prevalence of type 1 diabetes among children aged 0–14 in Australia 2013 presents the first national picture of children aged 0–14 living with type 1 diabetes in Australia. The report, based on data from the National (insulin-treated) Diabetes Register, highlights that in 2013, 6,091 children aged 0–14 had type 1 diabetes in Australia. This represented 139 cases per 100,000 population, or about 1 in 720 Australians aged 0–14. About 2 in 5 children with type 1 diabetes used an insulin pump to administer insulin. The prevalence of type 1 diabetes among children differed by age, state/territory, and residential remoteness areas.

National Partnership Agreement on Indigenous Early Childhood Development: second annual report on health performance indicators 

This is the second annual performance report for the National Partnership Agreement on Indigenous Early Childhood Development. It provides the latest available information, as well as trends on the 6 health-related indicators in the partnership agreement. Key findings include:-The gap in low birthweight rates between babies of Indigenous and non-Indigenous mothers narrowed substantially between 2000 and 2010.-Indigenous mothers were more likely than non-Indigenous mothers to have smoked during pregnancy, and accessed antenatal care less often.-The infant mortality rate for Indigenous infants between 2001 and 2011 declined by 55%, but remained almost twice as high as for non-Indigenous infants.

Young people returning to sentenced youth justice supervision 2015 

The rate of return to sentenced youth justice supervision is an indicator of the effectiveness of the services provided to young people serving supervised sentences. Around 20% of those aged 10–16 when released from sentenced community-based supervision in 2012–13 returned to sentenced supervision in 6 months, and 44% returned within 12 months. The rate of return was higher for those released from sentenced detention: 50% returned to sentenced supervision within 6 months and 76% returned within 12 months.

Development of a national education and training data standards strategy and implementation plan 

The Australian Institute of Health and Welfare developed a national data standards strategy and implementation plan to enhance the comparability, quality and coherence of information across the Australian education and training sectors, including early childhood education, school education, vocational education and training (VET) and higher education. This project report summarises the activities and process undertaken over 12 months from October 2013 to develop the strategy and implementation plan.

Youth justice in Australia 2013–14 

There were 6,100 young people under youth justice supervision in Australia on an average day in 2013–14, due to their involvement, or alleged involvement, in crime. This number has fallen from about 6,400 in 2012–13. Most (85%) of these young people were supervised in the community and the remainder were in detention. Young people spent 26 weeks, on average, under supervision during the year.