Reports

Featured reports

Rural & remote health 

Australians living in rural and remote areas tend to have shorter lives, higher levels of disease and injury and poorer access to and use of health services compared to people living in metropolitan areas. Poorer health outcomes in rural and remote areas may be due to a range of factors, including a level of disadvantage related to education and employment opportunities, income and access to health services.

Risk factors to health 

Health risk factors are attributes, characteristics or exposures that increase the likelihood of a person developing a disease or health disorder. Behavioural risk factors are those that individuals have the most ability to modify. Biomedical risk factors are bodily states that are often influenced by behavioural risk factors.

Radiotherapy in Australia 2015–16 

In 2015–16, 60,600 courses of radiotherapy were delivered in Australia. For non-emergency treatment, 50% of patients started treatment within 9 days, and 90% within 27 days. For those who needed emergency treatment, 91% began treatment within the emergency timeframe. Data covered effectively 100% of courses delivered in Australia.

The burden of chronic respiratory conditions in Australia: a detailed analysis of the Australian Burden of Disease Study 2011 

This report presents information on the disease burden of chronic respiratory conditions using data from the Australian Burden of Disease Study 2011. Respiratory conditions were the sixth leading contributor to total burden of disease in Australia, with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma and upper respiratory conditions being the greatest contributors to the respiratory burden. The burden due to respiratory conditions generally decreased over time, varied by condition severity and by population group, and some of the burden was attributed to modifiable risk factors such as tobacco use.

The burden of musculoskeletal conditions in Australia: a detailed analysis of the Australian Burden of Disease Study 2011 

This report presents findings from the Australian Burden of Disease Study 2011 on the burden of musculoskeletal conditions in Australia. Musculoskeletal conditions were the fourth leading contributor to total burden of disease in Australia, with back pain and problems, osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis being the greatest contributors to the musculoskeletal burden. The burden due to musculoskeletal conditions generally decreased over time, varied by condition severity and by population group, and some of the burden was attributed to modifiable risk factors such as overweight and obesity.

Cancer screening in Australia: participation data 

Cancer screening programs aim to reduce illness and death resulting from cancer through an organised approach to screening. These tables present the latest participation data for Australia’s three cancer screening programs: BreastScreen Australia, National Cervical Screening Program and National Bowel Cancer Screening Program.

Burden of cancer in Australia: Australian Burden of Disease Study 2011 

Cancer was the greatest cause of health burden in Australia in 2011, accounting for around one-fifth of the total disease burden. Most (94%) of this burden was due to dying prematurely, with only a small proportion of the burden due to living with a cancer diagnosis. This report explores in further detail the burden of cancer in Australia, including cancer burden in Aboriginal and Torres Strait islander people, and by remoteness and socioeconomic group. It also looks at how the cancer burden has changed since 2003, and the potential burden of cancer expected in 2020.

Indigenous eye health measures 2016 

This is the first national report on 22 newly developed Indigenous eye health measures. The measures cover the prevalence of eye health conditions, diagnosis and treatment services for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians, the eye health workforce and outreach services. Subject to data availability, the report examines differences between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians, as well as differences by factors such as age, sex, remoteness, jurisdiction and Primary Health Network.

Weight loss surgery in Australia 2014–15: Australian hospital statistics 

Weight loss surgery in Australia 2014–15: Australian hospital statistics is a new report in AIHW’s series of summary reports describing the characteristics of hospitals and hospital services in Australia. In 2014–15, there were about 22,700 hospital separations involving one or more weight loss surgery procedures. Seven in 8 of these separations occurred in private hospitals. Around 18,000 of weight loss surgery separations, or 79%, were for female patients. From 2005–06 to 2014–15, the total number of weight loss surgery separations more than doubled, from about 9,300 to 22,700.

National Bowel Cancer Screening Program: monitoring report 2017 

This report presents statistics on the National Bowel Cancer Screening Program (NBCSP) using key performance indicators. Of those who were invited to participate in the NBCSP between 1 January 2014 and 31 December 2015, 39% undertook screening. For those screened in 2015, 8% had a positive result warranting further assessment. One in 29 participants who underwent a follow-up diagnostic assessment was diagnosed with a confirmed or suspected cancer.

Cervical screening in Australia 2014–2015 

Cervical screening in Australia 2014–2015 presents the latest national statistics monitoring the National Cervical Screening Program, which aims to reduce incidence, morbidity and mortality from cervical cancer. Just over half (56%) of women in the target age group of 20–69 took part in the program, with more than 3.8 million women screening in 2014 and 2015. Cervical cancer incidence for women of all ages remains at an historical low of 7 new cases per 100,000 women, and deaths are also low, historically and by international standards, at 2 deaths per 100,000 women.