Reports

Featured reports

Rural & remote health 

Australians living in rural and remote areas tend to have shorter lives, higher levels of disease and injury and poorer access to and use of health services compared to people living in metropolitan areas. Poorer health outcomes in rural and remote areas may be due to a range of factors, including a level of disadvantage related to education and employment opportunities, income and access to health services.

Access to health services by Australians with disability 

People with disability use a range of mainstream health services—such as GPs, medical specialists and dentists. Some experience difficulties in accessing these services, such as unacceptable or lengthy waiting times, cost, inaccessibility of buildings, and discrimination by health professionals.

An interactive insight into overweight and obesity in Australia 

Overweight and obesity is a major public health issue and among the leading risk factors to ill-health in Australia. This web report provides interactive data displays on the prevalence of overweight and obesity, differences in the prevalence between certain population groups and what is happening over time.

The data displays draw on data from 2 AIHW reports: A picture of overweight and obesity in Australia and Overweight and obesity in Australia: a birth cohort analysis.

Mortality Over Regions and Time (MORT) books 

MORT books are Excel workbooks that contain recent deaths data for specific geographical areas, sourced from the AIHW National Mortality Database. They present statistics by sex for each geographical area, including counts, rates, median age at death, premature deaths, potential years of life lost and potentially avoidable deaths. The workbooks also present leading causes of death by sex for each geographical area.

Risk factors to health 

Health risk factors are attributes, characteristics or exposures that increase the likelihood of a person developing a disease or health disorder. Behavioural risk factors are those that individuals have the most ability to modify. Biomedical risk factors are bodily states that are often influenced by behavioural risk factors.

The burden of chronic respiratory conditions in Australia: a detailed analysis of the Australian Burden of Disease Study 2011 

This report presents information on the disease burden of chronic respiratory conditions using data from the Australian Burden of Disease Study 2011. Respiratory conditions were the sixth leading contributor to total burden of disease in Australia, with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma and upper respiratory conditions being the greatest contributors to the respiratory burden. The burden due to respiratory conditions generally decreased over time, varied by condition severity and by population group, and some of the burden was attributed to modifiable risk factors such as tobacco use.

The burden of musculoskeletal conditions in Australia: a detailed analysis of the Australian Burden of Disease Study 2011 

This report presents findings from the Australian Burden of Disease Study 2011 on the burden of musculoskeletal conditions in Australia. Musculoskeletal conditions were the fourth leading contributor to total burden of disease in Australia, with back pain and problems, osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis being the greatest contributors to the musculoskeletal burden. The burden due to musculoskeletal conditions generally decreased over time, varied by condition severity and by population group, and some of the burden was attributed to modifiable risk factors such as overweight and obesity.

Cancer screening in Australia: participation data 

Cancer screening programs aim to reduce illness and death resulting from cancer through an organised approach to screening. These tables present the latest participation data for Australia’s three cancer screening programs: BreastScreen Australia, National Cervical Screening Program and National Bowel Cancer Screening Program.

Burden of cancer in Australia: Australian Burden of Disease Study 2011 

Cancer was the greatest cause of health burden in Australia in 2011, accounting for around one-fifth of the total disease burden. Most (94%) of this burden was due to dying prematurely, with only a small proportion of the burden due to living with a cancer diagnosis. This report explores in further detail the burden of cancer in Australia, including cancer burden in Aboriginal and Torres Strait islander people, and by remoteness and socioeconomic group. It also looks at how the cancer burden has changed since 2003, and the potential burden of cancer expected in 2020.

Indigenous eye health measures 2016 

This is the first national report on 22 newly developed Indigenous eye health measures. The measures cover the prevalence of eye health conditions, diagnosis and treatment services for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians, the eye health workforce and outreach services. Subject to data availability, the report examines differences between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians, as well as differences by factors such as age, sex, remoteness, jurisdiction and Primary Health Network.

National Bowel Cancer Screening Program: monitoring report 2017 

This report presents statistics on the National Bowel Cancer Screening Program (NBCSP) using key performance indicators. Of those who were invited to participate in the NBCSP between 1 January 2014 and 31 December 2015, 39% undertook screening. For those screened in 2015, 8% had a positive result warranting further assessment. One in 29 participants who underwent a follow-up diagnostic assessment was diagnosed with a confirmed or suspected cancer.

Cervical screening in Australia 2014–2015 

Cervical screening in Australia 2014–2015 presents the latest national statistics monitoring the National Cervical Screening Program, which aims to reduce incidence, morbidity and mortality from cervical cancer. Just over half (56%) of women in the target age group of 20–69 took part in the program, with more than 3.8 million women screening in 2014 and 2015. Cervical cancer incidence for women of all ages remains at an historical low of 7 new cases per 100,000 women, and deaths are also low, historically and by international standards, at 2 deaths per 100,000 women.

Older Australia at a glance 

Older people make up a considerable proportion of Australia’s population—in 2016, over 1 in 7 people were aged 65 and over. This report provides an overview of this diverse and growing population group through a range of topics. These outline older people’s demographic characteristics, health status, and service use.

Firearm injuries and deaths 

This factsheet examines hospitalisations (2013–14) and deaths (2012–13) that occurred as a result of firearm-related injuries. Over 90% of all firearm-related hospitalisations and deaths occurred among men. Over a third of hospitalised cases were the result of unintentional injury, one-third (33%) resulted from assault, and in almost one-fifth (19%) of cases, intent was undetermined. In contrast, over 79% of deaths resulted from intentional self-harm (suicide), while over 17% resulted from assault (homicide). Rates of firearm-related injuries for deaths fell between 1999–00 and 2013–14.

Burden of lower limb amputations due to diabetes in Australia: Australian Burden of Disease Study 2011 

The Australian Burden of Disease Study (ABDS) 2011 captured four complications of diabetes—diabetic neuropathy, diabetic foot ulcer, lower limb amputation, and vision impairment—and their prevalence and burden were estimated. This bulletin presents findings from the ABDS on the burden of diabetes-related lower limb amputations in Australia. In 2011, it was estimated that about 730,000 Australians had diagnosed diabetes, 1.7% (12,300) of whom experienced lower limb amputation. The health loss experienced as a direct result of diabetes-related lower limb amputation accounted for about 1% of total non fatal burden estimated for diabetes in 2011. This represented 456 years of healthy life lost due to living with disability in Australia.

Incidence of insulin-treated diabetes in Australia 2015 dynamic data display 

The Incidence of insulin-treated diabetes in Australia 2015 dynamic data display provides data on insulin-treated diabetes, including type 1, type 2 and gestational diabetes. Data are disaggregated by age at first insulin use, Indigenous status, remoteness, SEIFA, state/territory, and trends for type 1 diabetes and insulin-treated type 2 diabetes.

Cancer in Australia 2017  

Cancer in Australia 2017 presents the latest available information on national population screening programs, Medicare data, cancer incidence, hospitalisations, survival, prevalence, mortality and burden of disease. Cancer is the leading cause of disease burden in Australia.

Chronic kidney disease compendium 

The AIHW has developed core monitoring information on the prevalence, incidence, hospitalisation and deaths from CKD (including ESKD) in Australia that is updated on a regular basis on the AIHW website to ensure that the most up-to-date information and trends is easily accessible and available.

Asthma 

Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways. People with asthma experience episodes of wheezing, breathlessness and chest tightness due to widespread narrowing of the airways.

Osteoarthritis 

Osteoarthritis is a degenerative condition that mostly affects the hands, spine and joints such as hips, knees and ankles, and usually gets worse over time. It is the predominant condition leading to knee and hip replacement surgery in Australia.

Diabetes compendium 

The AIHW has developed core monitoring information on the prevalence, incidence, hospitalisation and deaths from diabetes (including type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, and gestational diabetes) in Australia that is updated on a regular basis on the AIHW website to ensure that the most up-to-date information and trends is easily accessible and available.