Reports

Featured reports

Incidence of suicide among serving and ex-serving Australian Defence Force personnel 2001–2015: in brief summary report 

This in-brief report summarises results on the incidence of suicide among serving and ex-serving Australian Defence Force (ADF) personnel using 15 years of data and identifies characteristics that may be associated with risk of suicide. In 2001–2015 there were 325 certified suicide deaths among people with at least 1 day of ADF service since 2001. Of these deaths 166 occurred in the ex-serving population. Ex-serving men aged 18–24 were at particular risk—2 times more likely to die from suicide than Australian men of the same age. Service characteristics that may be associated with the higher rate of suicide in ex-serving men included: involuntary discharge—particularly medical discharge, short length of service (<1 year) and rank other than a commissioned officer.

Fourth study of mortality and cancer incidence in aircraft maintenance personnel: a continuing study of F-111 Deseal/Reseal personnel 2016 

Between 1974 and 2000, the Royal Australian Air Force undertook a series of formal Deseal/Reseal (DSRS) programs, alongside informal repair activities, to correct fuel leaks inside the fuel tanks of F-111 aircraft. A number of concerns were raised about health outcomes in personnel who worked on these programs and associated activities. The repair work was suspended in 2000, and a series of inquiries and health studies followed. This report presents the findings of the fourth iteration of a series of studies on mortality and cancer incidence of F-111 DSRS personnel. The report will be a valuable resource for policy makers, program managers and health professionals interested in health outcomes of Australian Defence Force personnel.

Incidence of suicide among serving and ex-serving Australian Defence Force personnel 2001–2014 

There is strong and increasing public interest in, and concern about, the incidence of suicide among serving and ex-serving Australian Defence Force (ADF) personnel. A study undertaken by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare calculates, for the first time, accurate rates of suicide deaths among ex-serving ADF personnel. This fact sheet presents the preliminary results of this analysis for three ADF populations—serving full-time, reserve and ex-serving personnel—and shows the number of suicide deaths for 2001–2014 and the comparative rate of suicide death for 2002–2014 (for men only, as number of women in the study meant valid comparisons were not possible). Further detailed results are anticipated to be released in mid-2017.

Third study of mortality and cancer incidence in aircraft maintenance personnel: a continuing study of F-111 Deseal/Reseal personnel 2009 

In 1977, the Royal Australian Air Force commenced a series of Deseal / Reseal (DSRS) programs on the fuel tanks of F-111 aircraft. These programs were implemented to correct fuel leaks inside the F-111 fuel tanks. A number of concerns were raised about health outcomes in personnel who worked on these programs.This report builds on previous findings from studies on mortality and cancer incidence of personnel who worked on the DSRS programs. The report will be a valuable resource for policy makers, program managers and health professionals interested in health outcomes of military personnel.

Cancer incidence in Australian Vietnam Veterans study 2005 

This report is the first of four volumes to be published and is the first investigation of cancer incidence for male Australian Vietnam veterans from all three branches of the armed forces – Navy, Army and Air Force. The number of females who served in Vietnam were too few for meaningful results in a study of this kind.

Cancer incidence study 2003: Australian veterans of the Korean War 

This study was commissioned by the Department of Veterans' Affairs and has investigated the incidence rates of cancer among Australian male veterans of the Korean War between 1982 and 1999 and compared these with the incidence rates over the same period for male members of the general Australian population of the same age.

Mortality study 2003: Australian veterans of the Korean War 

This study investigates mortality rates, both generally and for specific causes of death, among Australian male veterans of the Korean War from their last day of service in Korea to 31 December 2000, and compared these with the corresponding rates for general Australian male population of the same age.

Morbidity of Vietnam veterans: adrenal gland cancer, leukaemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, supplementary report 2 

This report provides medical validations for three conditions of concern regarding the health of Vietnam veterans and their children - adrenal gland cancer in veterans' children, the four main types of leukaemia in veterans and their children, and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in veterans. It is the second supplementary report to Morbidity of Vietnam Veterans: Volume 3 Validation Study and responds to a recommendation of that study that 'cancer of the adrenal gland in veterans' children be further investigated and compared to a derived community standard'. Comparisons have also been made for the four leukaemia types to expand on the total leukaemia comparisons from the study, while the non-Hodgkin's lymphoma comparisons are revisions to those included in the validation report. This report further extends the knowledge about the health of Vietnam veterans and their families.

Morbidity of Vietnam veterans: multiple sclerosis and motor neurone disease in Vietnam veterans, supplementary report 3 

This report provides medical validations for two conditions of concern regarding the health of Vietnam veterans - multiple sclerosis and motor neurone disease.It is the third supplementary report to Morbidity of Vietnam Veterans: Volume 3 Validation Study and fulfils the recommendation in Volume 1 of the study, the survey of male veterans, that the reported rates of multipe sclerosis and motor neurone disease be validated. This report further extends the knowledge about the health of Vietnam veterans and their families.

Morbidity of Vietnam veterans: suicide in Vietnam Veterans' children, supplementary report 1 

Morbidity of Vietnam veterans: suicide in Vietnam Veterans' children, supplementary report 1: a study of the health of Australia's Vietnam veteran community analyses suicide patterns among Vietnam veterans' children highlighting time trends, age and sex distribution, location and method of suicide. It is a supplementary report to Morbidity of Vietnam Veterans: Volume 3 Validation Study which recommended that suicide in veterans' children be further investigated and the result drawn to the attention of the Vietnam Veterans Counselling Service. This report extend the knowledge about the health of Vietnam veterans and their families.

Morbidity of Vietnam veterans: a study of the health of Australia's Vietnam veteran community 

This report examines the health issues facing Vietnam veterans and their families. It reports on the medical validation of a number of selected conditions found to have a high prevalence in veterans and their children. The Australian Institute of Health and Welfare coordinated the medical validation through disease registers and clinicians with the consent of veterans and their children. This report describes the aims, the methods and the results of this validation process and compares the results with the levels expected within the Australian community. The report also recommends further action in following up the patterns of disease and death in veterans and their children.

Dapsone exposure: Vietnam service and cancer incidence 

A report to the Scientific Advisory Committee to the Minister for Veterans' Affairs. Aims to assess and quantify any association between cancer incidence and exposure to dapsone and to Vietnam service among Australian Army personnel who served in Vietnam during the Vietnam conflict.

Dapsone exposure, Vietnam service and cancer incidence 

A report to the Scientific Advisory Committee to the Minister for Veterans' Affairs. Aims to assess and quantify any association between cancer incidence and exposure to dapsone and to Vietnam service among Australian Army personnel who served in Vietnam during the Vietnam conflict.