Table of contents

  • List of tables
  • List of figures
  • Acknowledgments
  • Abbreviations
  • 1 Introduction
    • 1.1 Restructuring services for older people
    • 1.2 Length of stay
  • 2 Implementing a life table approach
    • 2.1 Resident flows
    • 2.2 The life table approach
    • 2.3 Terms
    • 2.4 Data sources and limitations
  • 3 Current patterns of length of stay (1992-93)
    • 3.1 Length-of-stay distribution (Ix and Fx)
    • 3.2 Separation probability (nqx)
    • 3.3 Expected length of stay (ex)
    • 3.4 Length of stay and bed-day use (Gx and Hx)
  • 4 Resident characteristics and length of stay (1992-93)
    • 4.1 Sex ofresidents and age at admission
    • 4.2 Dependency levels (RCI)
    • 4.3 Marital status
    • 4.4 Prior living arrangement
    • 4.5 Housing tenure
    • 4.6 Whether admitted from hospital
    • 4.7 Non-English-speaking background
    • 4.8 Pension status
  • 5 Nursing home characteristics and length of stay
    • 5.1 State
    • 5.2 Region
    • 5.3 Nursing home type
    • 5.4 Nursing home size
  • 6 Changing patterns of length of stay (1989-90 to 1992-93)
    • 6.1 Expected length of stay
    • 6.2 Length-of-stay distribution for recent annual admissions
    • 6.3 Very-short-term and short-term admissions
  • 7 Turnover and accessibility
    • 7.1. Turnover
    • 7.2 Accessibility
  • 8 Summary and conclusions
    • 8.1 Overall pattern
    • 8.2 Resident characteristics and length of stay
    • 8.3 Nursing home characteristics and length of stay
    • 8.4 Changing patterns of length of stay
    • 8.5 Turnover
    • 8.6 Accessibility
    • 8.7 Reconstructing the image of nursing homes
    • 8.8 Methodological developments
    • 8.9 Further research
    • 8.10 Data development
  • Appendix A: Notes on methodology
  • Appendix B: Supplementary statistics
  • References