Drugs of concern

In 2016–17, cannabis was the most common principal drug of concern in treatment episodes provided to clients for their own drug use in Queensland (37% of clients, and 33% of episodes) (Figure 10; Tables SC QLD.4 and SD.8). Queensland is the only jurisdiction where the most common principal drug of concern is cannabis (attributable to clients diverted to treatment by police or courts). Alcohol was the second most common principal drug of concern, accounting for just under one-third of closed treatment episodes (31%), followed by amphetamines (21%).

When episodes for additional drugs of concern are considered, nicotine was the most common additional drug, accounting for 21% of closed episodes, followed by alcohol (20%), and cannabis (19%), which overtook amphetamines (13%) as the third most common additional drug of concern from 2015–16 (clients can nominate up to 5 additional drugs of concern for their treatment episode).

Over the 5 years to 2016–17, cannabis has remained the most common principal drug of concern in closed treatment episodes provided to clients for their own drug use, since replacing alcohol in 2014–15. Amphetamines has remained the third most common principal drug of concern, and has been increasing since 2012–13 (11% to 21% in 2016–17). The proportion of episodes for clients’ own drug use where cannabis was the principal drug have remained consistently higher than the national average, ranging from 39% in 2015–16 to 33% in 2016–17 in Queensland, compared with 24% in 2014–15 to 22% in 2016–17 nationally (Table SD.2).

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