Type 1 diabetes

Type 1 diabetes

There were around 63,100 hospitalisations where type 1 diabetes was recorded as the principal and/or additional diagnosis in 2016–17—15,400 as the principal diagnosis and 47,700 as an additional diagnosis.

Age and sex

In 2016–17, type 1 diabetes hospitalisation rates (as the principal diagnosis) were:

  • Overall similar among males and females (64 and 66 per 100,000 population).
  • Highest among young people aged 10–19 (99 and 124 per 100,000 for males and females, respectively) (Figure 2a).

Hospitalisation rates for type 1 diabetes showed a different age pattern when recorded as an additional diagnosis rather than a principal diagnosis—rates increased steadily up to age group 70–79 and then declined (Figure 2b).

Figure 2a: Type 1 diabetes hospitalisations (principal diagnosis), by age and sex, 2016–17

The bar chart shows hospitalisations with type 1 diabetes as the principal diagnosis peaked in the 10–19 year age group with 99 and 124 hospitalisations for males and females, respectively, per 100,000 population. Hospitalisation rates were 1.2 and 1.3 times higher for females than males in the 10–19 and 20–29 year age group. Rates were similar or slightly higher for males in all other age groups.

Chart: AIHW. Source: AIHW analysis of the National Hospital Morbidity Database. (Data table)

Figure 2b: Type 1 diabetes hospitalisations (additional diagnosis), by age and sex, 2016–17

The bar chart shows hospitalisations with type 1 diabetes as the additional diagnosis increased with age and peaked in the 70–79 age group (444 per 100,000 males and 325 per 100,000 females, respectively).

Chart: AIHW. Source: AIHW analysis of the National Hospital Morbidity Database. (Data table)

Variation among population groups

In 2016–17, type 1 diabetes hospitalisation rates (as the principal and/or additional diagnosis) varied by remoteness and increased with socioeconomic disadvantage. Rates were:

  • Higher in Inner regional and Outer regional areas (310 and 278 per 100,000 population) compared with Major cities and Remote and very remote areas (235 and 218 per 100,000 population) (Figure 3).
  • 1.6 times as high in the lowest socioeconomic group compared with the highest socioeconomic group (based on area of usual residence)—303 compared with 195 per 100,000. This gap was similar for males and females (Figure 3).

Figure 3: Type 1 diabetes hospitalisations, (principal and/or additional diagnosis), by remoteness and socioeconomic group, 2016–17

The bar chart shows type 1 diabetes hospitalisations (principal and/or additional diagnosis) in 2016–17 were slightly higher in Inner regional and Outer regional areas compared with Major cities and Remote and very remote areas, for both males and females. The chart also shows type 1 diabetes hospitalisations increased with the level of socioeconomic disadvantage in 2016–17. Similar for males and females, the rate per 100,000 population increased from 195 for the least disadvantaged group to 303 for the most disadvantaged group.

Note: Age-standardised to the 2001 Australian Standard Population.

Chart: AIHW. Source: AIHW analysis of the National Hospital Morbidity Database. (Data table)

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

In 2016–17, there were around 2,900 hospitalisations for type 1 diabetes (as the principal and/or additional diagnosis) among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, a rate of 381 per 100,000 population.

After adjusting for differences in the age structure of the populations:

  • The rate among Indigenous Australians was 1.9 times as high as for non-Indigenous Australians.
  • The disparity between Indigenous Australians and non-Indigenous Australians was greater for males than females—2.1 times as high for males and 1.7 times as high for females.