Insulin-treated type 2 diabetes incidence

Type 2 diabetes is a progressive condition which occurs when the body becomes resistant to insulin or insulin production is inadequate; because the condition tends to develop over a long period of time, it generally has later onset. When blood glucose levels can no longer be maintained at optimum levels through diet, exercise and other medications, insulin replacement may be required.

In 2016:

  • 16,371 people began using insulin to manage their type 2 diabetes—61 cases per 100,000 population, or around 1 in every 1,500 Australians.
  • Incidence rate was 1.5 times as high in males as in females—74 per 100,000 males compared with 49 per 100,000 females.
  • Almost all (91%) new cases of insulin-treated type 2 diabetes occurred in those 40 and over, with highest incidence rate in people aged 80–84 (240 cases per 100,000 population).
  • Incidence rates were almost 3 times as high among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people than among non-Indigenous Australians (103 compared with 39 cases per 100,000 population, respectively).
  • Incidence rates were relatively similar across remoteness areas—ranging from 59–67 cases per 100,000 population.
  • Incidence rates for insulin-treated type 2 diabetes were twice as high among those in the lowest socioeconomic group compared with those in the highest group (83 compared with 37 cases per 100,000 population, respectively).
  • Incidence rate of insulin-treated type 2 diabetes varied across states and territories, ranging from 73 cases per 100,000 population in South Australia to 49 cases per 100,000 in Australian Capital Territory.

Over a five year period (2012–2016):

  • Across Primary Health Network (PHN) areas, the highest incidence rates for insulin-treated type 2 diabetes, were in Western Queensland, Darling Downs and West Moreton (Queensland) and Northern Queensland with 138, 119 and 98 cases per 100,000 population, respectively. These areas have insulin-treated type 2 diabetes rates around 1.5–2 times as high as the national average.
  • At smaller geographical areas (Statistical Area Level 3), the highest incidence rates for insulin-treated type 2 diabetes were in Far North (Queensland), Mount Druitt (New South Wales) and Playford  (South Australia), with 198, 171 and 171 cases per 100,000 population, respectively. These areas have insulin-treated type 2 diabetes rates around 3 times as high as the national average.

To explore the insulin-treated type 2 diabetes data by trends, age, and population groups (Indigenous status, remoteness and socioeconomic groups) see data visualisation Insulin-treated type 2 diabetes (and the data table tabs trends by age and sex and population groups).

To explore insulin-treated type 2 diabetes data by geographic areas (state and territory, Primary Health Networks and statistical area level 3) see data visualisation Insulin-treated type 2 diabetes: geographical areas (and the data table tabs State & Territory, PHN and SA3).