Occupations

Among employed working-age people with disability, the most commonly identified occupations are:

  • professionals (22%)
  • clerical and administrative workers (14%)
  • labourers (13%).

Occupations vary among groups (Figure 1). For example, of working-age people who are employed:

  • 1 in 4 (25%) with severe or profound disability work as labourers, compared with 1 in 8 (12%) who have other disability and 1 in 11 (9%) without disability
  • 1 in 5 (21%) work as clerical and administrative workers, compared with 1 in 8 (13%) and 1 in 8 (13%)
  • 1 in 6 (15%) work as a professional, compared with 1 in 4 (23%) and 1 in 4 (24%)
  • 1 in 13 (8%) work as technicians and trades workers, compared with 1 in 7 (14%) and 1 in 7 (14%).

Males with disability are more likely than their female counterparts to work as a:

  • labourer—15% compared with 11%
  • technician or trade worker—21% compared with 4.1%
  • manager—15% compared with 8.7%.

Females with disability are more likely than their male counterparts to work as a:

  • professional—26% compared with 18%
  • sales worker—11% compared with 6%
  • clerical or administrative worker—21% compared with 7.7%
  • community or personal service worker—15% compared with 5.7%.

Figure 1 Alternative Text

Column chart showing occupations of people with and without disability. The reader can select to display the chart by eight categories of occupation, by sex, and by age group, including 15-24, 25-44, 45-64, 65+ years and all ages. The chart shows people with disability are more likely (13%) to be labourers than those without disability (9%).

References

ABS (Australian Bureau of Statistics) 2016. Microdata: disability, ageing and carers, Australia, 2015. ABS cat. no. 4430.0.30.002. Canberra: ABS. AIHW analysis of TableBuilder.