Occupations

Among employed working-age people with disability, the most commonly identified occupations are:

  • professionals (22%)
  • clerical and administrative workers (14%)
  • labourers (13%).

Occupations vary among groups (Figure 1). For example, of working-age people who are employed:

  • 1 in 4 (25%) with severe or profound disability work as labourers, compared with 1 in 8 (12%) who have other disability and 1 in 11 (9%) without disability
  • 1 in 5 (21%) work as clerical and administrative workers, compared with 1 in 8 (13%) and 1 in 8 (13%)
  • 1 in 6 (15%) work as a professional, compared with 1 in 4 (23%) and 1 in 4 (24%)
  • 1 in 13 (8%) work as technicians and trades workers, compared with 1 in 7 (14%) and 1 in 7 (14%).

Males with disability are more likely than their female counterparts to work as a:

  • labourer—15% compared with 11%
  • technician or trade worker—21% compared with 4.1%
  • manager—15% compared with 8.7%.

Females with disability are more likely than their male counterparts to work as a:

  • professional—26% compared with 18%
  • sales worker—11% compared with 6%
  • clerical or administrative worker—21% compared with 7.7%
  • community or personal service worker—15% compared with 5.7%.

References

ABS (Australian Bureau of Statistics) 2016. Microdata: disability, ageing and carers, Australia, 2015. ABS cat. no. 4430.0.30.002. Canberra: ABS. AIHW analysis of TableBuilder.