After support

Housing outcomes for clients with disability generally improve following support, with fewer homeless when they leave support.

Overall, almost half (46%) of clients with disability are homeless when they start support, compared with one-third (33%) at the end of support.

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This varies by their housing situation at the start of support. Clients with disability who begin support at risk of homelessness are much more likely to end support housed (88%) than those who begin support homeless (42%).

This further varies by the living situation at the start of support (Figure 2). Of clients with disability who begin support:

  • at risk of homelessness, those living in:
    • institutional settings are the least likely to be housed following support (65%)
    • public or community housing are the most likely to be housed following support (87%)
  • homeless, those living:
    • with no shelter or in an improvised or inadequate dwelling are the least likely to be housed following support (29%)
    • in short-term temporary accommodation are the most likely to be housed following support (44%).

Clients with disability (67%) are as likely as clients without disability (69%) to end support housed, although there are some differences in their living situations after support. For example, clients with disability are:

  • more likely than clients without to exit support to public or community housing (23% compared with 18%)
  • less likely to exit to private or other housing (as a renter, rent free or owner) (32% compared with 38%).
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Changes over time

Between 2013–14 and 2017–18, there has been improvements in how likely homeless people with disability are to be housed following support (Table 1). There was little change for those who began support when at risk of homelessness (Table 2).

Table 1: SHS clients with disability who began support homeless, by housing situation at end of support, 2013–14 to 2017–18 (%)

Situation at end of support

2013–14

2014–15

2015–16

2016–17

2017–18

At risk of homelessness

35.5

39.8

41.3

41.2

42.9

Homeless

64.5

60.2

58.7

58.8

57.1

Notes

  1. The SHSC classifies clients as ‘homeless’ if they are living with no shelter or an improvised or inadequate dwelling, in short-term temporary accommodation, or in a house, townhouse or flat with relatives (rent free). It classifies clients as ‘housed’ if they are living in public or community housing (renter or rent free), private or other housing (renter or rent free), or in institutional settings.
  2. Proportions include only clients with closed support at the end of the reporting period. Per cent calculations are based on total clients, excluding ‘not stated/other’.

Source: SHSC 2017–18; see also Table S13.

Table 2: SHS clients with disability who began support at risk of homelessness, by housing situation at the end of support, 2013–14 to 2017–18 (%)

Situation at end of support

2013–14

2014–15

2015–16

2016–17

2017–18

At risk of homelessness

86.0

86.1

86.3

86.5

87.3

Homeless

14.0

13.9

13.7

13.5

12.7

Notes

  1. The SHSC classifies clients as ‘homeless’ if they are living with no shelter or an improvised or inadequate dwelling, in short-term temporary accommodation, or in a house, townhouse or flat with relatives (rent free). It classifies clients as ‘housed’ who are living in public or community housing (renter or rent free), private or other housing (renter or rent free), or in institutional settings.
  2. Proportions include only clients with closed support at the end of the reporting period. Per cent calculations are based on total clients, excluding ‘not stated/other’.

Source: SHSC 2017–18; see also Table S13;

Alternative text for After support

Figure 1

Stacked column chart showing the housing status before and after support of clients of Specialist Homelessness Services (SHS), with and without disability. The reader can select to display the chart by disability status. The chart shows people with and without disability have a similar likelihood of being homeless after receiving SHS support (29% and 28% respectively). Back to figure 1

Figure 2

Diagram showing the flow of Specialist Homelessness Services (SHS) clients between housing situations, for clients with and without disability. The reader can select to display the chart by disability status. The chart shows people with disability are less likely to be couch surfing after SHS support (8%) than people without disability (10%). Back to figure 2