Tenure type

Almost two-thirds (64%) of people with disability own their home. They belong to an income unit with ‘owner’ as tenure type, either with (23%) or without (41%) a mortgage.

Close to one-third (29%) are renting, and 5% live rent free.

 People with severe or profound disability are:

  • less likely to own their own home—58% compared with 66% of people with other disability
  • more likely to rent—32% compared with 28%
  • more likely to live rent free—8% compared with 4%.

Dependent children and students

Dependent children and students share the tenure type of the individuals they depend on. Around:

  • two-thirds (61%) of dependents with disability live in a household that owns their home
  • one-third (36%) in households that are renting.

Dependents with disability are more likely than those without disability to live in households with less secure tenure types:

  • 61% with disability live in a home that is owned, compared with 67% without disability
  • 36% live in a home that is rented, compared with 30%.

Living in a household as a dependent student is the most common household relationship for young people (aged 15–24) with disability (43%). This is followed by:

  • being a non-dependent child (35%)
  • living in other household relationships (22%).

The most common living arrangement for young people with disability was living as a dependent student in a home that was owned (31%), followed by being a non-dependent child living rent free (23%).

Non-dependent persons aged 15 and over

Non-dependent people with disability in all age groups are less likely than those without disability to be owners (Figure 1).

Older people (aged 65 and over) are more likely to own their home. However, the increase in home ownership as people age was smaller for those with disability than for those without (Figure 2).

The decrease in renting as people age is more gradual for those with disability than without disability. For example, non-dependent people aged 55–64 with disability (27%) are more than twice as likely as those without disability (12%) to be renting.

The relationships people have within their households vary between those with and without disability and by tenure type. For example:

  • non-dependent people with disability are more likely than those without disability to live alone or as single parents, and less likely to live with a husband, wife or partner:
  • 56% lived with a husband, wife or partner, compared with 67% without disability
  • 24% lived alone, compared with 9.5%
  • 7% are lone parents, compared with 4.7% (Figure 3)
  • people with disability living in lone person or lone-parent households are less likely than those without disability to own their home (Figure 4)
  • people living in lone person or lone-parent households are less likely to own their home than those living with a husband, wife or partner (Figure 4).

References

ABS (Australian Bureau of Statistics) 2016. Microdata: disability, ageing and carers, Australia, 2015. ABS cat. no. 4430.0.30.002. Canberra: ABS. AIHW analysis of TableBuilder data.