Region of ARF diagnosis

For each acute rheumatic fever (ARF) diagnosis, region of diagnosis is recorded on the rheumatic heart disease (RHD) register. In most cases the place where infection was acquired cannot be determined. ARF cases were assigned to their diagnosis state or territory, and region for this analysis.

In 2014–2018, the Northern Territory accounted for 55% of the 1,963 acute rheumatic fever (ARF) diagnoses among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people (1,085 diagnoses). The rate of ARF diagnoses among Indigenous Australians also increased considerably in the Northern Territory between 2014 and 2018—from 198 to 353 per 100,000 population, respectively.

Although the rate of ARF diagnoses in 2018 was greater than that in 2014 across Queensland, South Australia and Western Australia, the increase was not consistent.

In 2014–2018, the highest rates of ARF diagnoses were reported in the Northern Territory:

  • Rural Darwin with 477 per 100,000 population (300 diagnoses)
  • Urban Alice Springs with 424 per 100,000 (142)
  • East Arnhem with 403 per 100,000 (229).

ARF diagnoses among Indigenous Australians by region of diagnosis. An interactive map of Australia showing the rate of ARF diagnoses among Indigenous Australians in 2014-2018, by region of diagnosis. There is the option to filter by state and territory, with data only included from the Northern Territory, Queensland, South Australia and Western Australia. The highest rates of ARF diagnosis were seen in the Northern Territory.

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