SHS housing situation cube metadata

This page supports the use of the SHS housing situation national cube. The data within this cube relate to the 2011–12 to 2014–15 financial years.

You can find information on:

  • the data items available in this cube
  • explanatory notes that outline some of the important aspects of the data in this cube
  • a series of examples on how to query the data in this cube.

Under the section Available data items you will find a list of all the data items available for analysis in this cube. This list provides a brief explanation of the data item's response categories, as well as a brief description of the rules used for determining a client's response.

Under the section Explanatory notes you will find information that is useful for interpreting and analysing the SHSC data generally and this cube specifically. This section will cover information on the SHSC client conceptual framework, that is, how client's responses are recorded and the rules used to decide which response is used at the client level. More specifically, this relates to some of the more technical aspects of the data, such as explaining the first/last reported data items, majority data items and summative data items.

Available data items
Data item Category Status Flags(a) for Data item

Age Group

The age of the client at the beginning of their first support period in the reporting period or the age of the client at the beginning of the reporting period—whichever occurs later.

0−9 

10−14

15−17

18−19

20−24

25−29

30−34

35−39

40−44

45−49

50−54

55−59

60−64

65+

n.p.—Client age is not published to protect the confidentiality of client information.

First reported

Care or Protection Order

Yes—client was aged under 18 years, and in at least one support period within the reporting period, reported being under a care and protection order, and

  • reported one of the following care arrangements:
    • residential care,
    • family group home,
    • relatives/kin/friends (reimbursed),
    • foster care,
    • other home-based care (reimbursed),
    • relatives/kin/friends (not reimbursed), or
    • independent living; or
  • reported ‘transition from foster care/child safety residential placements’ as a reason for seeking assistance.

No—client was not identified as being under a care or protection order within the reporting period. 

Ever reported

Case Management Goals Achieved(b)

The extent to which the client achieved their case management goals, as recorded by the agency worker.

None—no case management goals were achieved for the client, in any of their support periods in the reporting period.

Some—the client achieved at least one of their case management goals, but did not complete all of their case management goals, in any of their support periods in the reporting period.

All—the client achieved all of their case management goals, in all of their support periods in the reporting period.

Invalid—there was no valid response for the client for this data item in the reporting period.

Ever reported

Case Management Plan

Whether a personal plan or a support agreement was in-place for ths client, as recorded by the agency worker.

Yes—the client had a case management plan in place for any of their support periods.

No—the client did not have a case management plan in place for any of their support periods. Includes clients where a case management plan was not developed or finalised, clients who refused a case management plan, and children covered by their parent/guardian’s case management plan.

Ever reported

Closed Support

Yes—if all support periods for the client in the reporting period are closed.

No—if any of the support periods for the client in the reporting period are ongoing.

n/a

Domestic violence

Yes—in at least one support period within the reporting period:

  • the client reported ‘domestic and family violence’ as a reason for seeking assistance, or
  • the client was assessed as having a need for ‘domestic or family violence assistance'.

No—client was not identified as experiencing domestic violence within the reporting period.

Ever reported

Dwelling Type(b)

The type of residence/dwelling in which the client reported living.

House/townhouse/flat—Includes bedsits, flats attached to houses or shops etc.

Caravan

Tent

Cabin

Boat

Improvised building/dwelling

No dwelling/street/park/in the openIncludes those people who are sleeping in public transport, e.g. riding on trains/buses etc. because they have no other option.

Motor vehicle

Boarding/rooming house

Emergency accommodation—Includes night shelters/women’s refuges/youth shelters.

Hotel/motel/bed and breakfast

Hospital (excluding psychiatric)Includes hospitals and other health care facilities by not specialised prison health facilities.

Psychiatric hospital/unitIncludes mental health units and forensic health units of corrective services systems.

Disability supportIncludes all units whose primary role is disability support.

RehabilitationIncludes facilities that cater for drug and alcohol rehabilitation. Excludes rehabilitation in prisons and correctional facilities.

Adult correctional facilityIncludes those facilities whose main role is to detain and rehabilitate adult prisoners, such as a prison.

Youth/juvenile justice correctional centreIncludes those facilities whose main role is to detain and rehabilitate youth or juveniles. Community custodial facilities are included in this category.

Boarding school/residential college

Aged care facilityRefers to nursing homes, aged care hostels or non-self-contained accommodation for the aged.

Immigration detention centreIncludes immigration residential housing and immigration transit accommodation.

Otherthe client indicated they were in a dwelling/residence type that is not listed in the categories above.

Don't know

Invalid or Missing

First reported, last reported

Exiting Care

Yes—in at least one support period within the reporting period:

  • the client had a dwelling type of:
    • hospital (excluding psychiatric),
    • psychiatric hospital or unit,
    • disability support,
    • rehabilitation, or
    • aged care facility; or
  • One of their reasons for seeking assistance was:
    • transition from foster care/child safety residential placements, or
    • transition from other care arrangements.

No—client was not identified as exiting care within the reporting period.

Ever reported

Exiting Custody

Yes—client is aged 10 years or older, and in at least one support period within the reporting period:

  • the client had a dwelling type of:
    • adult correctional facility,
    • youth or juvenile justice detention centre, or
    • immigration detention centre; or
  • the client reported ‘transition from custodial arrangements’ as a reason for seeking assistance, or
  • the formal referral source to the SHS agency was:
    • youth or juvenile justice correction centre, or
    • adult correctional facility.

No—client was not identified as transitioning from a custodial setting within the reporting period.

Ever reported

Homeless(c)

Homeless—information recorded for the client’s dwelling type, tenure type and conditions of occupancy indicated they were homeless when presenting to the agency for service.

At-risk— information recorded for the client’s dwelling type, tenure type and conditions of occupancy indicated they were at-risk of homelessness when presenting to the agency for service.

Not classified—there was not enough information provided for the client to determine whether they were homeless or at-risk of homelessness when presenting to the agency for service.
Please refer to the Explanatory notes for a description of how homelessness status is assigned.

First reported

Housing(c) 

The type of housing in which the client reported living.

No shelter or improvised/inadequate dwelling

Short term temporary accommodation

House, townhouse or flat

Public or community housing

Private or other housing

Institutional settings

Other

First reported, last reported

Indigenous Status

Indigenous—if the client identifies as Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander in any of their support periods during the reporting period.

Non-Indigenous—if the client identifies as neither Aboriginal nor Torres Strait Islander, and does not identify as Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander in any of their support periods during the reporting period.

Not stated—if the client does not provide any information on their Indigenous status, in any of their support periods during the reporting period.

Ever reported

Mental Health Issue(d)

Yes—client is aged 10 years or older, and in at least one support period within the reporting period:

  • reported ‘mental health issues’ as a reason for seeking assistance; or
  • was assessed as having a need for psychological services, psychiatric services or mental health services; or
  • was formally referred to the agency by a mental health service; or
  • had been in a psychiatric hospital or unit in the last 12 months; or
  • had a dwelling type of psychiatric hospital or unit.

No—client was not identified as having a mental health issue within the reporting period.

Ever reported

Months homeless

0–12—The number of months in the reference period that the client was recorded as experiencing homelessness. Includes months in which the client did not receive services from a specialist homelessness service but reported being homeless.

Month

Months homeless status

0–12—The number of months in the reference period where the client was recorded as receiving services from a specialist homelessness agency and was recorded as experiencing homelessness.

Month

Occupancy(c)

The conditions of occupancy that are attached to the client’s legal right to live in the residence/dwelling, as reported by the client.

Leased tenure-nominated on lease—Includes clients who are renting and are listed on the contract for the lease, and clients who have tenure with a rent/buy scheme.

Lease in place-not nominated on lease—Includes clients who are living in accommodation where a lease is in place but the client is not named on the lease agreement.

Couch surfer—Includes clients who typically move from household to household intermittently, who are not regarded as being part of those households, and who do not have any form of leased tenure over any accommodation.

Boarder—Includes clients who are boarding, and who are supplied with meals and/or lodging in return for payment.

Living with relative rent free—Includes clients who are related to a member of a household, and who are not paying a fee for their lodging; and children who are living with a parent who either owns or is renting the dwelling.

Other  

Not applicable—Includes: clients with no tenure who are not a Couch surfer or Living with a relative fee free; clients in a life tenure scheme; clients with no tenure where they have been living in an institutional setting such as a hospital, psychiatric hospital/unit, disability support unit, rehabilitation facility, adult correctional facility, youth/juvenile justice detention centre, boarding school/residential college, aged care facility or immigration detention centre; and clients who own their own home.

Don’t know—The client’s condition of occupancy is unknown.

Invalid/missing—There is no information for the client’s condition of occupancy.

First reported, last reported

Reason No Case Management Plan

The reason why there was no case management plan for the client, as recorded by the agency worker.

Client did not agree to one—the client was asked about formulating a plan, but did not agree to do so.

Service episode too short—A case management plan was not appropriate for the client due to the length of the service episode (support period).

Part of another person’s case management plan—the client is covered by another person’s case management plan. For example a child accompanying an adult.

Other—a case management plan was not formulated for some other reason.

Invalid—a case management plan was in place.

Ever reported

Sex

The sex of the client.

Male
Female

First reported

State/Territory

The state/territory where the client received support (i.e. had a support period). Note: Clients can be counted in more than one state/territory.

NSW

Vic

Qld

SA

WA

Tas

NT

ACT

Summative

Tenure(c)

The client’s legal right to live in the residence/dwelling, as reported by the client.

Renter-Private housing—Includes clients renting a dwelling owned by a private individual(s) or a private business (not owned by a government body or a housing association, housing cooperative or other not-for-profit community service organisation).

Renter-Public housing—Includes clients renting a dwelling owned/controlled by a government body or government authority.

Renter-Community housing—Includes clients renting a dwelling owned/controlled by a housing association, housing cooperative or other not-for-profit community service organisation.

Renter-Transitional housing—Includes clients renting accommodation provided through a government-funded agency. The accommodation is generally more stable and provided for longer than crisis accommodation, and is linked to external support through an agency.

Renter-Caravan park—Includes clients renting a cabin or caravan in a caravan park.

Renter-Boarding/rooming house—Includes clients renting a room or rooms in a boarding or rooming house.

Renter-Emergency accommodation/night shelter/women’s refuge/youth shelter where rent is charged—Includes clients paying rent for emergency accommodation, a night shelter, women’s refuge or youth refuge.

Other renter—A client renting accommodation that is not included in the categories listed above.

Rent free-Private housing—Includes clients staying rent free at a dwelling owned by a private individual(s) or a private business (not owned by a government body or a housing association, housing cooperative or other not-for-profit community service organisation).

Rent free-Public housing—Includes clients staying rent free at a dwelling owned/controlled by a government body or government authority.

Rent free-Community housing—Includes clients staying rent free at a dwelling owned/controlled by a housing association, housing cooperative or other not-for-profit community service organisation.

Rent free-Transitional housing—Includes clients staying rent free at accommodation provided through a government-funded agency. The accommodation is generally more stable and provided for longer than crisis accommodation, and is linked to external support through an agency.

Rent free-Caravan park—Includes clients staying rent free in a cabin or caravan in a caravan park.

Rent free-Boarding/rooming house—Includes clients staying rent free in a room or rooms in a boarding or rooming house.

Rent free-Emergency accommodation/night shelter/women’s refuge/youth shelter where rent is not charged — Includes clients staying rent free in emergency accommodation, a night shelter, women’s refuge or youth refuge.

Other rent free—Includes clients staying rent free at accommodation that is not included in the categories listed above.

Life tenure scheme—Includes clients with a contract to live in the dwelling for the term of their life but without the full rights of ownership and usually with limited or no equity in the dwelling. This is a common arrangement in retirement villages.

Owner-shared equity or rent/buy scheme—Includes clients who are purchasing a proportion of the equity in the dwelling, and paying rent for the remainder.

Owner-being purchased/with mortgage—Includes clients who own their dwelling and are repaying a mortgage or loan secured against the dwelling, regardless of the purpose of the mortgage or secured loan.

Owner-fully owned— Includes clients who own their dwelling and are not making any payments on mortgages or loans secured against the dwelling. Clients who have repaid a loan, but technically not discharged the associated mortgage, are included in this category.

Other tenure type not elsewhere specified—Includes clients with tenure that does not fit any of the above categories e.g. clients who are house-sitting or receiving payment in kind for a specific service, such as live-in nanny.

No tenure—Includes clients who are sleeping rough or do not have a legal right to occupy a dwelling and can be asked to leave at any time; clients who are couch surfing, living on the streets, sleeping in parks, squatting, using cars or railway carriages, improvised dwellings, or living in the long grass; and clients who are living in an institutional setting, such as a hospital, psychiatric hospital/unit, disability support unit, rehabilitation facility, adult correctional facility, youth/juvenile justice detention centre, boarding school/residential college, aged care facility or immigration detention centre.

Don’t know

Invalid/missing

First reported, last reported

Year

The financial year reference period.

n.a.

Notes

  1. Status flags relate to the point in time at which the recorded information is taken for the client. For more information see Status flags below.
  2. This cube can produce counts for both clients with or without closed support. Please note that the SHSC annual report only describes the extent to which case management goals are achieved for clients with closed support (i.e. for whom all support periods in the reporting period were closed). This cube may produce differences in SA estimates than in other publications due to differences in the preparation of source data.
  3. Clients aged less than 15 years presenting with an adult are given the adult’s dwelling type, tenure type, and conditions of occupancy. This information is also used to derive both their housing situation and homelessness status. This is done because the dwelling, tenure and conditions of occupancy information of a client aged less than 15 years can result in incorrect homelessness classifications.
  4. The derivation for mental health status has changed over time. From 2014–15, the data relates to all clients (including clients aged up to 10 years), while the previous data relates to clients aged over 10 years only.

Explanatory notes

Clients in the SHSC

Data in this cube relate to clients who access specialist homelessness services. To present information on clients in the SHSC requires some modification of the data received from specialist homelessness services. This is because information received from specialist homelessness agencies relates to support periods (or service episodes). That is, all information collected of a person, relates to the time in which they started receiving services from an agency to when they stopped receiving services from that agency—a support period.

To create clients from support periods, a client conceptual framework was developed. The client conceptual framework essentially outlines certain rules to follow when determining the appropriate support period information for a client.

While this can be quite complicated and detailed, the following three broad points are most important to consider when interpreting and analysing client-level information in this and other client-level cubes:

  • A client can have multiple support periods
  • Some information is only collected at the beginning of a client’s support period and some information is only collected at the end of the client’s support period
  • For support periods that span more than one month, some information is collected in each month that the support period is open.

It is important to consider clients with multiple support periods as they can potentially have different responses to the same questions. For example, for the Indigenous status data item in this cube, a client may have identified as Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander (Indigenous) in one support period and identified as non-Indigenous in another. To create one Indigenous status for this client, one of these responses needs to be reported.

For information that is collected at different times in the support period, the decision on which response to report is dependent on what analysis is being performed on the data. For example, with the data in this cube, you may wish to analyse the housing situation outcomes of the client. To do this, you will most likely want to analyse the clients housing situation when they first reported to an agency—their first reported status—with their housing situation at the end of the reporting period—their last reported status.

Status flags

To account for all of these aspects of creating client-level data from support period data, ‘status flags’ have been created.

The status flags available in this cube are as follows:

Ever flag—Reports response categories for a client if they have ever provided that response in the reference period. Where there are multiple responses to the same data item, a hierarchy is created for the response categories within that data item.

The category at the top of the hierarchy is reported if the client ever provides this response in the reporting period, and the second category in the hierarchy is reported if the client ever provides this response within in the reporting period, but not the category above it in the hierarchy, and so on.

For example, taking the example of Indigenous status used above, the category hierarchy is as follows; ‘Indigenous’, ‘non-Indigenous’, ‘don’t know’, ‘invalid/missing’. So, if a client provides ‘Indigenous’ as a response in any of their support periods within the reporting period, they will be recorded as being an Indigenous client.

First reported flag—the response recorded for the client when they first presented to an agency in their support period with the earliest start date in the reference period.

For example, for a client with two support periods in 2011–12, one beginning on 1 July 2011 and another beginning on 7 July 2011, their housing situation first reported will equate to the information they provided at the beginning of the support period that began on 1 July 2011.

Last reported flag—the response recorded for the client with the latest date in the reference period.

For example, a client with a support period ending 10 June 2012 and another that ended on 25 June 2012, their labour force status last reported will equate to the information they provided at the end of their support period that ended on 25 June. Similarly, if the client had a support period that was ongoing at the end of June 2012, their housing situation last reported will equate to the information they provided at the end of June 2012.

Majority flag—the answer provided most often by the client in the reference period.

For example, if a client has three support periods in the reference period, and for their ‘Reason no case management plan’ information, provide the response ‘Part of another person’s case management plan’ in two of their support periods, and ‘Service episode too short’ in one of their support periods, ‘Part of another person’s case management plan’ will be the response reported for that client.

If the client has an equal number of responses between multiple support periods, a defined order of responses is used to determine which response to report for the client. For example, for the ‘Reason no case management plan’ data item, the order of responses is: ‘Service episode too short’, ‘Client did not agree to one’, ‘Part of another person’s case management plan’, and ‘Other.’

Summative—reports every response recorded for the client in the reference period.

For example, a client who received services in New South Wales and Victoria will have a response recorded in the ‘State/Territory’ data item for both of these states. It is important to remember that the total number of responses for data items with a summative status flags can potentially add to more than the number of clients.

Note: You may notice that when the ‘State/Territory’ data item is not included in the table, the ‘Applied filters’ section, located above the table, will show all states and territories are included in the table. In this instance, this does not mean the number of responses included in the table add to more than the number of clients. It is only when the State territory flag is included in the table that the number of responses will add to more than the number of clients in the reference period.

Month flag—provides a count of clients who record a specific response, or set of responses for every month they receive services in the reference period.

Generally, the flag will be used for a combination of categories that, together, derive a client’s circumstances—for example, a homeless episode. Therefore, a data item like ’Months homeless’ uses a client’s dwelling type, tenure type and conditions of occupancy to indicate the number of months in the reference period where the client was experiencing homelessness.