National rates by sex and age

In 2018–19, 241,000 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people received an Indigenous-specific health check—of these people, 47% (112,700) received an Indigenous-specific follow-up within 12 months of their health check.

Among people who had a health check in 2018–19:

  • The follow-up rate was slightly higher among Indigenous females (48%) than Indigenous males (45%). This pattern was seen in most age groups, except among children aged 0–4, where the follow-up rates were slightly higher for boys than girls.
  • For both males and females, the follow-up rate was highest among those aged 65 and over (54% and 57%, respectively).
  • For males, the follow-up rate was lowest among those aged 15–24 (38%).
  • For females, the follow-up rate was lowest among those aged 5–14 (41%) (Figure 13).

The variation in follow-up rates may partly reflect differences in the need for follow-up care among different age groups (see also Box 4). For example, in general, older people have higher health care needs than younger people, and so are likely to have a greater need for follow-up services.

Figure 13: Indigenous-specific health check patients who received an Indigenous-specific follow-up service in the 12 months following the health check, by year of health check, sex and age, 2010–11 to 2018–19

Column graph showing the number and proportion of Indigenous-specific health check patients who received an Indigenous-specific follow-up service in the 12 months following their Indigenous-specific health check, by financial year, age group and sex. In 2018–19, the follow-up rate was slightly higher among Indigenous females (48%) than Indigenous males (45%). This pattern was evident in most age groups, except for children aged 0 to 4, for whom rates were slightly higher for boys than girls (48% compared with 46%). For both males and females, the Indigenous-specific follow-up rates were highest among those aged 65 and over (57% and 54%, respectively); for males, the rate was lowest among those aged 15 to 24 (38%); for females, the rate was lowest among those aged 5 to 14 (41%). Refer to table ‘FS03’ in data tables.