National rates by sex and age

In 2016–17, 211,500 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people received an Indigenous-specific health check—of these people, 40% (84,400) received an Indigenous-specific follow-up within 12 months of their health check.

Among people who had a health check in 2016–17:

  • the follow-up rate was slightly higher among Indigenous females (41%) than Indigenous males (38%). This pattern was seen in most age groups, except among children aged 0–4 and 5–14, where the follow-up rates were slightly higher for boys than girls
  • for both males and females, the follow-up rate was highest among those aged 65 and over (47% and 50%, respectively)
  • for males, the follow-up rate was lowest among those aged 15–24 (31%)
  • for females, the follow-up rate was lowest among those aged 5–14 (34%) (Figure 8).

The variation in follow-up rates may partly reflect differences in the need for follow-up care among different age groups (see also Box 3). For example, in general, older people have higher health care needs than younger people, and so are likely to have a greater need for follow-up services.

Figure 8 Alternative text. Download data tables.

Number and type of follow-ups

Among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people who had an Indigenous-specific health check in 2016–17:

  • 18% had 1 Indigenous-specific follow-up within 12 months of the health check
  • 12% had 2 or 3 follow-ups
  • 3% had 4 follow-ups
  • 7% had 5 or more follow-ups (Figure 9).

Indigenous Australians who had an Indigenous-specific health check in 2016–17 were more likely to receive follow-up care from a practice nurse or Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health practitioner than from an allied health service provider:

  • 35% had at least one follow-up service from a practice nurse of Indigenous health practitioner
  • 10% had at least one allied health follow-up service.

Figure 9 Alternative text. Download data tables.