Number and type of follow-ups

Among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people who had an Indigenous-specific health check in 2018–19:

  • 20% had 1 Indigenous-specific follow-up within 12 months of the health check.
  • 10% had 2 follow-ups.
  • 5% had 3 follow-ups.
  • 3% had 4 follow-ups.
  • 9% had 5 or more follow-ups (Figure 14).

Indigenous Australians who had an Indigenous-specific health check in 2018–19 were more likely to receive follow-up care from a practice nurse or Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health practitioner than from an allied health service provider:

  • 43% had at least one follow-up service from a practice nurse of Indigenous health practitioner.
  • 11% had at least one allied health follow-up service.

Figure 14: Indigenous-specific health check patients, by number of follow-ups received in the 12 months following the health check, by year of health check and type of follow-up, 2010–11 to 2018–19

Bar graph showing the proportion of Indigenous Australians who had an Indigenous-specific follow-up service within 12 months of their Indigenous-specific health check, by number of follow-ups and type of follow-up (Allied Health service or service from a practice nurse or Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health practitioner), by financial year of the health check.

Among Indigenous Australians who had an Indigenous-specific health check in 2018–19: 20% had 1 Indigenous-specific follow-up within 12 months of the Indigenous-specific health check; 10% had 2 Indigenous-specific follow-ups; 5% had 3 Indigenous-specific follow-ups; 3% had 4 Indigenous-specific follow-ups; 9% had 5 or more Indigenous-specific follow-ups. Indigenous-specific health check patients more commonly received Indigenous-specific follow-up care from a practice nurse or an Indigenous health practitioner than from an allied health service provider. Refer to table ‘FS04’ in data tables.