Immunised against influenza—type 2 diabetes or COPD (PI15)

This indicator is the proportion of Indigenous regular clients aged 15–49 with type 2 diabetes or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) who had an influenza immunisation within the previous 12 months.

It is collected for males and females in age groups from 15–24 to 45–49. It is presented here for males and females in age groups:

  • under 35
  • 35–44
  • 45–49.

Why immunisation against influenza is important

Influenza (the flu) is a contagious respiratory disease that causes seasonal epidemics in Australia. Anyone can be infected with influenza but some people, such as Indigenous Australians, have a higher chance of serious illness and complications, such as pneumonia. Some people with influenza die as a result of their infection. Annual vaccination is the best way to prevent severe infections, hospitalisation and death due to influenza.

While immunisation against influenza is recommended for all Indigenous people aged 6 months and over, it is particularly important for those who are at a greater risk of complications from influenza infection, such as those with diabetes and COPD. Influenza vaccination substantially reduces the risk of hospitalisation and death from influenza and pneumonia for people with type 2 diabetes and COPD (AIHW 2018).

At June 2019:

  • 36% of Indigenous regular clients aged 15–49 with type 2 diabetes had an influenza immunisation within the previous 12 months
  • 38% of Indigenous regular clients aged 15–49 with COPD had an influenza immunisation within the previous 12 months.

Immunised against influenza—type 2 diabetes or COPD, by reporting period

This Tableau visualisation shows the percentage of Indigenous regular clients aged 15–49 with either type 2 diabetes or COPD who were immunised against influenza in the last year by reporting period (June 2017, December 2017, June 2018, December 2018 and June 2019).

Data supporting this visualisation are available in Excel supplementary data tables at Data.

Visualisation not available for printing

Influenza immunisation for those with type 2 diabetes was highest in:

  • the Northern Territory (42%)
  • Very remote areas (41%).

It was lowest in:

  • New South Wales/the Australian Capital Territory (combined, 26%)
  • Inner regional areas (27%).

Influenza immunisation for those with COPD was highest in:

  • the Northern Territory (51%)
  • Very remote areas (49%).

It was lowest in:

  • New South Wales/the Australian Capital Territory (combined, 28%)
  • Inner regional and Outer regional areas (both 29%).

Immunised against influenza—type 2 diabetes or COPD, by either state/territory or remoteness, reporting period

Two Tableau visualisations are presented here. The first shows the percentage of Indigenous regular clients aged 15–49 with either type 2 diabetes or COPD who were immunised against influenza in the last year for either:

  • state/territory (NSW/ACT, Vic, Qld, WA, SA, Tas, NT, Australia)
  • remoteness area (Major cities, Inner regional, Outer regional, Remote, Very remote, Australia).

Reporting periods of either June 2017, December 2017, June 2018, December 2018 or June 2019 can be selected.

The second visualisation shows the selected information from the first visualisation by sex (male, female) and age group (<35, 35–44, 45–49).

Data supporting this visualisation are available in Excel supplementary data tables at Data.

Visualisation not available for printing

Reference

AIHW (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare) 2018. PDF DownloadVaccine-preventable diseases fact sheets. Cat no. PHE 236. Canberra: AIHW.