Figure 1: Number of Indigenous-specific health check services and patients, 2010–11 to 2017–18

Line graph showing the number of Indigenous-specific health check services and number of patients between 2010–11 and 2017–18 by sex. The number of Indigenous-specific health check services provided to Indigenous Australians increased from around 72,000 in 2010–11 to 236,000 in 2017–18. The number of Indigenous Australians who received an Indigenous-specific health check increased from around 71,000 to 230,000 over this period. Refer to ‘Figure 1 data’ in data tables. Back to Figure 1.

Figure 2: Indigenous-specific health check patients, by sex and age group, 2017-18

Column graph showing the number and proportion of Indigenous Australians who received an Indigenous-specific health check by sex and age group. In 2017–18, 29% of Indigenous Australians had an Indigenous-specific health check, with a higher rate for Indigenous females than Indigenous males (31% compared with 27%). The rate of Indigenous-specific health checks was highest among those aged 65 and over for both males and females (43% for males and 40% for females). For males, the rate was lowest for those aged 15–24 (20%); for females, the rate was lowest for those aged 5–14 (26%). Refer to ‘Figure 2 data’ in data tables. Back to Figure 2.

Figure 3: Indigenous-specific health check patients by geographic area, 2017–18

Maps and column graphs showing the number and rate of Indigenous-specific health checks (per cent of Indigenous population) by state and territory, remoteness, PHN, and SA3.

In 2017–18, across states and territories, the Northern Territory had the highest rate of Indigenous-specific health checks (with 38% of the Indigenous population receiving an Indigenous-specific health check), followed by Queensland (37%). Tasmania had the lowest rate (13%). Refer to ‘Figure 3 data’ in data tables. Back to Figure 3.

Figure 4: Indigenous-specific health check patients, by number of checks, 2013–14 to 2017–18 combined

Column graph showing the number and rate of Indigenous-specific health checks received over the 5-year period from 1 July 2013 to 30 June 2018, by sex. About 59% Indigenous Australians received at least one Indigenous-specific health check over the 5-year period. About 25% of Indigenous Australians received 1 Indigenous-specific health check during the 5 year period; 15% received 2 Indigenous-specific health checks; 10% received 3 Indigenous-specific health checks; 6% received 4 Indigenous-specific health checks and 3% received 5 or more Indigenous-specific health checks. Refer to ‘Figure 4 data’ in data tables. Back to Figure 4.

Figure 5: Indigenous-specific health check patients, by state and territory, 2013–14 to 2017–18 combined

Column graph and map showing the number and rate of Indigenous-specific health checks received over 5-year period from 1 July 2013 to 30 June 2018, by state and territory.

Over the 5-year period to 30 June 2018, across states and territories, the proportion of the Indigenous population receiving at least one Indigenous-specific health check was highest in the Northern Territory (76%), followed by Queensland (72%); the rate was lowest in Tasmania (25%). Refer to ‘Figure 5 data’ in data tables. Back to Figure 5.

Figure 6: Rate of Indigenous-specific health check, 2010–11 to 2017–18

Line graph showing trends in the rate of Indigenous-specific health checks from 2010–11 to 2017–18, by sex. Between 2010–11 and 2017–18, the rate of Indigenous-specific health checks among Indigenous Australians increased from 11% to 30%. The increase was slightly larger for females than males—with an increase of 21 percentage points for Indigenous women (from 12% to 32%) compared with 18 percentage points for Indigenous men (10% to 28%). Refer to ‘Figure 6 data’ in data tables. Back to Figure 6.

Figure 7: Number of Indigenous-specific follow-up services and patients, 2010–11 to 2017–18

Line graph showing trends in the number of Indigenous-specific follow-up services, and number of people who received at least one Indigenous-specific follow-up service, between 2010–11 to 2017–18. In 2017–18, there were about 324,000 Indigenous-specific follow-up services provided to 133,000 Indigenous Australians. This was an increase from around 18,500 Indigenous-specific follow-ups provided to 9,900 patients in 2010–11. Refer to ‘Figure 7 data’ in data tables. Back to Figure 7.

Figure 8: Indigenous-specific health check patients who received an Indigenous-specific follow-up service within 12 months of the Indigenous-specific health check, by year of the check, sex and age

Column graph showing the number and proportion of Indigenous-specific health check patients who received an Indigenous-specific follow-up service within 12 months of their Indigenous-specific health check, by financial year and sex. In 2016–17, the follow-up rate was slightly higher among Indigenous females (41%) than Indigenous males (38%). This pattern was evident in most age groups, except for children aged 0–4 and 5–14, for whom rates were slightly higher for boys than girls. For both males and females, the Indigenous-specific follow-up rates were highest among those aged 65 and over (47% and 50%, respectively); for males, the rate was lowest among those aged 15–24 (31%); for females, the rate was lowest among those aged 5–14 (34%). Refer to ‘Figure 8 data’ in data tables. Back to Figure 8.

Figure 9: Indigenous-specific health check patients, by number of Indigenous-specific follow-ups received within 12 months of the Indigenous-specific health check and type of follow-up, 2010–11 to 2016–17

Column graph showing the proportion of Indigenous Australian who had an Indigenous-specific follow-up within 12 months of their Indigenous-specific health check, by number and type of follow-ups, and financial year of the health check.

Among Indigenous Australians who had an Indigenous-specific health check in 2016–17: 18% had 1 Indigenous-specific follow-up within 12 months of the Indigenous-specific health check; 12% had 2 or 3 Indigenous-specific follow-ups; 3% had 4 Indigenous-specific follow-ups; 7% had 5 or more Indigenous-specific follow-ups. Indigenous-specific health check patients were more likely to receive Indigenous-specific follow-up care from a practice nurse or an Indigenous health practitioner than from an allied health service provider. Refer to ‘Figure 9 data’ in data tables. Back to Figure 9.

Figure 10: Indigenous-specific health check patients in 2016–17 who received an Indigenous-specific follow-up service within 12 months of the Indigenous-specific health check, by geographic region

Column graphs and maps showing the number and proportion of Indigenous-specific health check patients in 2016–17 who had an Indigenous-specific follow-up within 12 months of their Indigenous-specific health check, by state and territory , remoteness, PHN, and SA3.

In 2016–17, across states and territories, the Northern Territory had the highest rate of Indigenous-specific follow-up (with 55% of the Indigenous population receiving an Indigenous-specific follow-up within 12 month of their Indigenous-specific health check), followed by Queensland (47%). Australian Capital Territory had the lowest rate (12%). Refer to ‘Figure 10 data’ in data tables. Back to Figure 10.

Figure 11: Indigenous-specific health check patients who received an Indigenous-specific follow-up service within 12 months of the Indigenous-specific health check, by sex and year of health check, 2010–11 to 2016–17

Line graph showing trends in the number and proportion of Indigenous-specific health check patients who received an Indigenous-specific follow-up within 12 months of their Indigenous-specific health check. Between 2010–11 and 2016–17, the rate of Indigenous-specific follow-up after an Indigenous-specific health check increased from 12% to 40%. Refer to ‘Figure 11 data’ in data tables. Back to Figure 11.

Table 1: Number of Indigenous-specific follow-up services and patients, by type of follow-up, 2017–18

Table showing the number of Indigenous-specific follow-up services and patients, by type of follow-up in 2017–18.

In 2017–18, there were 266,000 Indigenous-specific follow-up services provided to 119,000 Indigenous Australians by a practice nurse or an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health practitioner; 58,000 allied health follow-up services provided to 28,000 Indigenous Australians.

Of the allied health services, the most common type of Indigenous-specific follow-up were allied health services provided by physiotherapists (about 13,100 services), Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health practitioners or Aboriginal health worker (about 12,300 services), and podiatrists (10,200 services). Refer to ‘Table 1 data’ in data tables. Back to Table 1.